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Amanda (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
; but that he saw him prepared, and therefore durst not give the attempt. And all night the horsemen went the round; and two and two of every squadron rode about, and visited the scouts that were without the town in their standings by the passages, and the crossbow-men that kept the canoes in the rivers. VI.—Death and burial of de Soto. The next day, being the 21st of May, 1542, departed out of this life the valorous, virtuous, and valiant captain, Don Ferdinando de Soto, governor of Cuba, and adelantadoof Florida, whom fortune advanced, as it used to do others, that he might have the higher fall. He departed in such a place and at such a time, as [that] in his sickness he had but little comfort; and the danger wherein all his people were of perishing in that country, which appeared before their eyes, was cause sufficient why every one of them had need of comfort, and why they did not visit nor accompany him as they ought to have done. Luys de Moscoso determined to conceal h
Helena, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ell down with the stream, and landed right over against the camps. Two stones'-cast before they came to land, the horsemen went out of the barges on horseback, to a sandy plot of very hard and clear ground, where all of them landed without any resistance. As soon as those that passed first were on land on the other side, the barges returned to the place where the governor was; and, within two hours after sunrising, all the people were over. The place of crossing was probably near Helena, Arkansas. The river was almost half a league broad. If a man stood still on the other side, it could not be discerned whether he were a man or no. The river was of great depth, and of a strong current. The river was always muddy. There came down the river continually many trees and timber, which the force of the water and stream brought down. There was great store of fish in it, of sundry sorts, and the most of it differing from the fresh-water fish of Spain, as hereafter shall be shown.
West Indies (search for this): chapter 6
d and effected by that worthy General and Captain, Don Ferdinando de Soto, and six hundred Spaniards his followers. (Reprinted by Hakluyt Society, 1851.) Pages 9-16, 27-32, 89-92, 120-122, 125-127. This is a translation, made by Hakluyt in 1609, of a narrative by one of the companions of De Soto, first published in 1557. I.—how de Soto set sail. Captain Soto was the son of a squire of Xerez of Badajos. He went into the Spanish Indies when Peter Arias of Avila was governor of the West Indies. And there he was without any thing else of his own, save his sword and target. And, for his good qualities and valor, Peter Arias made him captain of a troop of horsemen; and, by his commandment, he went with Fernando Pizarro to the conquest of Peru, where (as many persons of credit reported, which were there present) . . . he passed all other captains and principal persons. For which cause, besides his part of the treasure of Atabalipa, he had a good share; whereby in time he gathere
Great River (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
efore they would return to their cacique, and bid him come presently, to obey and serve the governor. And, after they had presented him with six or seven skins and mantles which they brought, they took their leave of him, and returned with the other, which waited for them by the brookside. The cacique never came again, nor sent other message. And, because in the town where the governor lodged there was small store of maize, he removed to another half a league from Rio Grande, The Great River, or Mississippi. where they found plenty of maize. And he went to see the river, and found that near unto it was great store of timber to make barges, and good situation of ground to encamp in. Presently he removed himself thither. They made houses, and pitched their camp in a plain field, a crossbow-shot from the river. And thither was gathered all the maize of the towns which they had lately passed. They began presently to cut and hew down timber, and to saw planks for barges. The
Hillsborough River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ns which were to go in them; and took for himself a new ship, and good of sail, and gave another to Andrew de Vasconcelos, in which the Portuguese went. He went over the bar of San Lucar on Sunday, being San Lazarus day, in the morning, of the month and year aforesaid, with great joy, commanding his trumpets to be sounded, and many shots of the ordnance to be discharged. Ii.—De Soto attacks the Indians, and finds a fellow-countryman. From the town of Ucita, Probably near the Hillsborough River in Florida. the governor sent the alcalde mayor, Baltasar de Gallegos, with forty horsemen and eighty footmen, into the country, to see if they could take any Indians; and the captain, John Rodriguez Lobillo, another way, with fifty footmen. The most of them were swordmen and targetiers; Men who carried swords and targets. Others carried matchlock guns (arquebuses) or cross-bows. and the rest were shot and crossbow men. They passed through a country full of bogs, where horses coul
De Soto, Jefferson County, Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Book VI: the adventures of de Soto. (A. D. 1538-1542.) These extracts are taken from The W9, of a narrative by one of the companions of De Soto, first published in 1557. I.—how de Soto de Soto set sail. Captain Soto was the son of a squire of Xerez of Badajos. He went into the Spanish Inhe gathered an hundred and fourscore ducats De Soto. together, with that which fell to his part,hots of the ordnance to be discharged. Ii.—De Soto attacks the Indians, and finds a fellow-countt. An arrow, where it findeth no Landing of de Soto armor, pierceth as deeply as a crossbow. Thee Gallegos, as I have declared before. Iv.—De Soto discovers the Mississippi. The next day, w of Spain, as hereafter shall be shown. V.—De Soto's vain attempts to reach the sea. That days in the rivers. VI.—Death and burial of de Soto. The next day, being the 21st of May, 1542ch had saved his life. [After the death of De Soto, his companions descended the Mississippi
Peru (Peru) (search for this): chapter 6
rative by one of the companions of De Soto, first published in 1557. I.—how de Soto set sail. Captain Soto was the son of a squire of Xerez of Badajos. He went into the Spanish Indies when Peter Arias of Avila was governor of the West Indies. And there he was without any thing else of his own, save his sword and target. And, for his good qualities and valor, Peter Arias made him captain of a troop of horsemen; and, by his commandment, he went with Fernando Pizarro to the conquest of Peru, where (as many persons of credit reported, which were there present) . . . he passed all other captains and principal persons. For which cause, besides his part of the treasure of Atabalipa, he had a good share; whereby in time he gathered an hundred and fourscore ducats De Soto. together, with that which fell to his part, which he brought into Spain. . . . The emperor made him the governor of the Isle of Cuba, and adelantadoor president of Florida, with a title of marquis of certain par
Badajos (Amazonas, Brazil) (search for this): chapter 6
y and Famous History of the Travels, Discovery, and Conquest of Terra Florida, accomplished and effected by that worthy General and Captain, Don Ferdinando de Soto, and six hundred Spaniards his followers. (Reprinted by Hakluyt Society, 1851.) Pages 9-16, 27-32, 89-92, 120-122, 125-127. This is a translation, made by Hakluyt in 1609, of a narrative by one of the companions of De Soto, first published in 1557. I.—how de Soto set sail. Captain Soto was the son of a squire of Xerez of Badajos. He went into the Spanish Indies when Peter Arias of Avila was governor of the West Indies. And there he was without any thing else of his own, save his sword and target. And, for his good qualities and valor, Peter Arias made him captain of a troop of horsemen; and, by his commandment, he went with Fernando Pizarro to the conquest of Peru, where (as many persons of credit reported, which were there present) . . . he passed all other captains and principal persons. For which cause, besi
Seville (Spain) (search for this): chapter 6
gave him not a sum of money which he demanded to buy a ship, they broke off again . . . . . The Portuguese departed from Elvas the 15th of January, and came to Seville the 19th of the same month, and went to the lodging of the governor, and entered into a court, over the which there were certain galleries where he was, who came to dinner. And, being at dinner, he commanded his steward to seek a lodging for them near unto his own, where they might be lodged. The adelantadodeparted from Seville to Saint Lucar with all the people which were to go with him. And he commanded a muster to be made, at the which the Portuguese showed themselves armed in very brn the camp, they were received with the like. With the same joy. III.—The story of John Ortiz. This Christian's name was John Ortiz; and he was born in Seville in worshipful parentage. Of a good family He was twelve years in the hands of the Indians. He came into this country with Pamphilo de Narvaez, and returned in
Cabeza Vaca (search for this): chapter 6
rt of the treasure of Atabalipa, he had a good share; whereby in time he gathered an hundred and fourscore ducats De Soto. together, with that which fell to his part, which he brought into Spain. . . . The emperor made him the governor of the Isle of Cuba, and adelantadoor president of Florida, with a title of marquis of certain part of the lands that he should conquer. . . . When Don Ferdinando had obtained the government, there came a gentleman from the Indies to the court, named Cabeza de Vaca, which had been with the governor Pamphilo de Narvaez, which died in Florida,— who reported that Narvaez was cast away at sea, with all the company that went with him, and how he with four more escaped, and arrived in New Spain; and he brought a relation in writing of that which he had seen in Florida, which said in some places, In such a place I have seen this; and the rest which here I saw, I leave to confer of between his Majesty and myself. . . . And he informed them, that it was the
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