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S. W. Crawford (search for this): chapter 6
on on the right, and the second, under General Greene, on the left. During the deployment, that veteran soldier, General Mansfield, fell mortally wounded. The command of the corps fell to General Williams, and the division of the latter to General Crawford, who, with his own and Gordon's brigade, made an advance across the open field, and succeeded in seizing a point of woods on the west side of the Hagerstown road. At the same time, Greene's division on the left was able to clear its front, the victory. The troops of Jackson and Hood had been so severely punished as to leave little available fight in them; so that, when Sumner threw Sedgwick's divisions on his right across the open field into the woods opposite—the woods in which Crawford had been fighting—he easily drove the shattered Confederate troops before him, and held definitive possession of the woods around the Dunker church. At the same time, Sumner advanced French's division on what had hitherto been the left, and Ric
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 6
e presence of the hostile force would detain McClellan on the frontier long enough to render an invic of his name with the soldiers he had led. McClellan's reappearance at the head of affairs had thrmarch from Hagerstown to Hill's support. McClellan, by his knowledge of Lee's movements, was soon the soil of Virginia. This inactivity of McClellan after Antietam, has been made the theme for on, timidity, and consequent inaction. What McClellan knew was that the battle had cost the terrib inspire a circumspect policy on the part of McClellan; for Virginia had been lost, and Maryland wa. Says Hill: Had all our stragglers been up, McClellan's army would have been completely crushed or of Southwestern Maryland. Iii. Close of McClellan's career. The movement from Washington inuct of the War. Thus ended the career of McClellan as head of the Army of the Potomac—an army wtion of that campaign prompted the recall of McClellan as the only man who could make the army effi[51 more...]
his own three divisions, the two divisions of McLaws, and the division of Walker, was assigned. JaHarper's Ferry, and, investing it by the rear; McLaws was to move by way of Middletown on the directight next morning have fallen upon the rear of McLaws at Maryland Heights, and relieved Harper's Ferederate defence of Crampton's Pass was left to McLaws, who was engaged in the investment of Harper'sed, oven if he lost his last man in doing it. McLaws' Report: Reports of the Army of Northern Virgising a very feeble and unskilful resistance to McLaws' attack on the 13th, retired to Harper's Ferryus Maryland Heights was abandoned altogether. McLaws succeeded in dragging some pieces up the ruggepsburg, with the exception of the divisions of McLaws and A. P. Hill, which had not yet returned froorderly rout. two Confederate divisions, under McLaws and Walker, taken from the Confederate right, sition held in the morning. Of this attack, McLaws says: The troops were immediately engaged, dri[6 more...]
the flank fire at South Mountain. In a moment they broke and fell to the rear. Efforts were made to rally them in the bed of an old road, nearly at right angles to the Hagers. town pike, and which had been their position previous to the advance.—Re ports of the Army of Northern Virginia, vol. II., p. 115. Uniting here with the other brigades of Hill, they received the attacks both of French and of Richardson's division to his left. The latter division was composed of the brigades of Meagher, Caldwell, and Brooke. Meager first attacked, and fought his way to the possession of a crest overlooking the sunken road in which Hill's line was posted. After sustaining a severe musketry fire, by which it lost severely, this brigade, its ammunition being expended, was relieved by the brigade of Caldwell—the former breaking by companies to the rear, and the latter by companies to the front. Caldwell immediately became engaged in a very determined combat, and was supported by part of Br
John Sedgwick (search for this): chapter 6
o leave little available fight in them; so that, when Sumner threw Sedgwick's divisions on his right across the open field into the woods oppo, when disaster again fell on the fatal right. At the moment that Sedgwick appeared to grasp victory in his hands, and the troops of Jackson rable interval had been left between Sumner's right division under Sedgwick and his centre division under French. Through this the enemy penetrated, enveloping Sedgwick's left flank, and, pressing heavily at the same time on his front, forced him out of the woods on the west side ofrench and Richardson on his centre and left. When the pressure on Sedgwick became the hardest, Sumner sent orders to French to attack, as a ded so heavily on his left, and the repulse of Sumner's right under Sedgwick had been so easily effected, that the enemy began to show a disposons served to check Sumner in his career of victory, and hurl back Sedgwick. This step the Confederate commander never would have ventured on
V. Exit Pope (search for this): chapter 6
plest act in that complex interplay of cause and effect we name war? A secondary operation, having in view merely to hold Pope in check, had effected not only its primal aim, but the infinitely more important result of dislodging the Army of the Potall care touching Richmond, Lee was free to assume a real offensive for the purpose not merely of checking but of crushing Pope. The success of the campaign had been remarkable. From the front of Richmond the theatre of operations had been transferhe rags, and the shocking filth of the army of liberation. In the dark hour when the shattered battalions that survived Pope's campaign returned to Washington, General Mc-Clellan, at the request of the President, resumed command of the Army of theountry. This, indeed, was practically done, when, on the return from the Peninsula, his troops were sent forward to join Pope; but the disastrous termination of that campaign prompted the recall of McClellan as the only man who could make the army
both of French and of Richardson's division to his left. The latter division was composed of the brigades of Meagher, Caldwell, and Brooke. Meager first attacked, and fought his way to the possession of a crest overlooking the sunken road in whicre musketry fire, by which it lost severely, this brigade, its ammunition being expended, was relieved by the brigade of Caldwell—the former breaking by companies to the rear, and the latter by companies to the front. Caldwell immediately became engCaldwell immediately became engaged in a very determined combat, and was supported by part of Brooke's brigade, the rest of the latter being posted on the right to thwart an effort on the part of the enemy to flank in that direction. The action here was of a very animated nature;lank. This manoeuvre was, however, frustrated by the skill and promptitude of Colonel Cross of the Fifth New Hampshire (Caldwell's brigade), who, detecting the danger, moved his regiment towards the menaced point. Between his command and the Confed
J. R. Brooke (search for this): chapter 6
, they received the attacks both of French and of Richardson's division to his left. The latter division was composed of the brigades of Meagher, Caldwell, and Brooke. Meager first attacked, and fought his way to the possession of a crest overlooking the sunken road in which Hill's line was posted. After sustaining a severe mby companies to the rear, and the latter by companies to the front. Caldwell immediately became engaged in a very determined combat, and was supported by part of Brooke's brigade, the rest of the latter being posted on the right to thwart an effort on the part of the enemy to flank in that direction. The action here was of a verietam-General Richardson having been mortally wounded during the forenoon.) The race was won by Cross. The effort to flank on the right was handsomely checked by Brooke, French, and Barlow—the latter of whom, changing front with his two regiments obliquely to the right, poured in a rapid fire, compelling the surrender of three hu
Pleasonton (search for this): chapter 6
in command of the reserve artillery on the Peninsula, relieved General Barry as chief of artillery, and remained in that position till the close of the war. General Pleasonton commanded the cavalry division. The army with which McClellan set out on the Maryland campaign, made an aggregate of eighty-seven thousand one hundred and housand men, held the centre, while Burnside remained inactive on the left, not having yet passed the Antietam. The left of Sumner's command was sustained by Pleasonton's cavalry division and the horse batteries, to whose support most of Sykes' division (Porter's corps) in the afternoon crossed the Antietam Now, between twelve ent stores, and after making the entire circuit of the Union army, recrossed the Potomac below the mouth of the Monocacy. He was all the way closely pursued by Pleasonton with eight hundred cavalry, but though that officer marched seventy-eight miles in twenty-four hours, he was unable to intercept or overtake his fast-riding riv
that attended the march through Maryland, that Jackson's old (Stonewall) division numbered but one thousand six hundred men. General J. R. Jones, who commanded this division at Antietam, says of it: The division was reduced to the numbers of a small brigade, and, at the beginning of the fight, numbered not over one thousand six hundred men.—Reports of the Army of Northern Virginia, vol. II., pp. 222,223. Of the number of the three brigades of Ewell's division holding the advanced line, General Early, who, at a subse quent part of the day, came into command of it, reports as follows: Lawton's brigade, one thousand one hundred and fifty; Hayes' brigade, five hundred and fifty; Walker's brigade, seven hundred. This would make a total for the two divisions of four thousand men—the number above given. After an hour's bloody bushwhacking, Hooker's troops succeeded in clearing the hither woods of the three Confederate brigades, which retired in disorder across the open fields, with a loss
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