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Cumberland Valley (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
sylvania by the Cumberland Valley, he hoped to draw the Union army so far towards the Susquehanna as to afford him either an opportunity of seizing Baltimore or Washington, or of dealing a damaging blow at the army far from its base of supplies. His first movement from Frederick was, therefore, towards the western side of that mountain range which, named the Blue Ridge south of the Potomac, and the South Mountain range north of the Potomac, forms the eastern wall of the Shenandoah and Cumberland valleys—the former his line of communications with Richmond and the latter his line of manoeuvre towards Pennsylvania. Sketch of manoeuvres on Antietam. Now, at the time Lee crossed the Potomac, the Federal post at Harper's Ferry, commanding the debouteh of the Shenandoah Valley, was held by a garrison of about nine thousand men, under Colonel D. H. Miles, while a force of twenty-five hundred men, under General White, did outpost duty at Martinsburg and Winchester. These troops receive
Alpine, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
rock. Maryland Heights is the name given the steep on the north bank, and Loudon Heights the steep on the south bank. Between Loudon Heights and Harper's Ferry the Shenandoah breaks into the Potomac, and to the rear of the ferry is a less bold ridge, named Bolivar Heights, which falls off in graceful undulations southward into the Valley of the Shenandoah. The picturesque little village of Harper's Ferry lies nestling in the basin formed by these three heights, which tower into an almost Alpine sublimity. A line drawn from any one mountain-top to either of the others must be two miles in stretch; yet rifle-cannon crowning these heights can easily throw their projectiles from each to other— a sort of Titanic game of bowls which Mars and cloudcom-pelling Jove might carry on in sportive mood. But the Maryland Height is the Saul of the triad of giant mountains, and far o'ertops its fellows. Of course, it completely commands Harper's Ferry, into which a plunging fire even of musketry
Maryland Heights (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ng have fallen upon the rear of McLaws at Maryland Heights, and relieved Harper's Ferry, which did nstment of Harper's Ferry from the side of Maryland Heights; but Turner's Pass, as commanding the debly in the rear of and but five miles from Maryland Heights, opposite Harper's Ferry. McLaws on learp erate in the investment from Loudon and Maryland heights. Walker was already in position on Loudoeights, and McLaws was working his way up Maryland Heights. The latter position is the key-point to side a bold and lofty abutment of rock. Maryland Heights is the name given the steep on the north istribution of his command, had posted on Maryland Heights a force under Colonel Ford, retaining theplace, and transferred his whole force to Maryland Heights, which he could readily have held till Mc the morning, withdrew all his force from Maryland Heights, with the exception of a single regiment,. Smith (Couch remaining behind to occupy Maryland Heights), reached the field of battle, from where[2 more...]
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
e crossed the Potomac, the Federal post at Harper's Ferry, commanding the debouteh of the Shenandoah was the whim of General Halleck to regard Harper's Ferry as a point per se and in any event of the of Sharpsburg, crossing the Potomac above Harper's Ferry, and, investing it by the rear; McLaws wasLaws, who was engaged in the investment of Harper's Ferry from the side of Maryland Heights; but Tur have put Mc-Clellan in position to succor Harper's Ferry. During the contest at Turner's Gap, Frow in a position to succor the garrison at Harper's Ferry, whose situation was one of almost tragic ison from that side, he moved down towards Harper's Ferry. On his approach, General White with the sburg evacuated that place, and retired to Harper's Ferry, the rear of which, at Bolivar Heights, Jahe south bank. Between Loudon Heights and Harper's Ferry the Shenandoah breaks into the Potomac, andesigns. The retention of the garrison at Harper's Ferry compelled him to turn aside and reduce th[32 more...]
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
mond through the Shenandoah Valley. Then, by a northward movement, menacing Pennsylvania by the Cumberland Valley, he hoped to draw the Union army so far towards theof communications with Richmond and the latter his line of manoeuvre towards Pennsylvania. Sketch of manoeuvres on Antietam. Now, at the time Lee crossed the Pothe Potomac, or purposed manoeuvring by the line of Western Maryland towards Pennsylvania, he was obliged first of all to take up a position on which he might unite hginal design of taking up a position in Western Maryland, whence to threaten Pennsylvania. Crippled at Antietam, he was fain to cross the Potomac, and seek in Virginthis period no military movement occurred, with the exception of a raid into Pennsylvania by Stuart. About the middle of October, that enterprising officer, with twe crossed the Potomac above Williamsport, passed through Maryland, penetrated Pennsylvania, occupied Chambersburg, where he burnt considerable government stores, and a
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ac by a ponton-bridge at Berlin, five miles below Harper's Ferry. By the 2d November the entire army had crossed at that point. Advancing due southward towards Warrenton, he masked the movement by guarding the passes of the Blue Ridge, and by threatening to issue through these, he compelled Lee to retain Jackson in the Valley. With such success was this movement managed, that on reaching Warrenton on the 9th, while Lee had sent half of his army forward to Culpepper to oppose McClellan's advance in that direction, the other half was still west of the Blue Ridge, scattered up and down the Valley, and separated from the other moiety by at least two days marcons of the Confederate force; but this step he was prevented from taking by his sudden removal from the command of the Army of the Potomac, while on the march to Warrenton. Late on the night of November 7th, amidst a heavy snow-storm, General Buckingham, arriving post-haste from Washington, reached the tent of General McClellan at
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ominent a figure at the commencement of the contest; for it was inevitable that the first leaders should be sacrificed to the nation's ignorance of war. Taking this into account, estimating both what he accomplished and what he failed to accomplish, in the actual circumstances of his performance, I have endeavored in the critique of his campaigns to strike a just balance between McClellan and history. Of him it may be said, that if he does not belong to that foremost category of commanders made up of those who have always been successful, and including but a few illustrious names, neither does he rank with that numerous class who have ruined their armies without fighting. He ranges with that middle category of meritorious commanders, who, like Sertorius, Wallenstein, and William of Orange, generally unfortunate in war, yet were, in the words of Marmont, never destroyed nor discouraged, but were always able to oppose a menacing front, and make the enemy pay dear for what he gained.
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
assigned. Jackson was to proceed by way of Sharpsburg, crossing the Potomac above Harper's Ferry, Lee, who was eagerly awaiting his arrival at Sharpsburg. The successful lodgment McClellan had gadetour by way of Shepherdstown joined Lee at Sharpsburg. Upon the retirement of the Confederates erate line was drawn in front of the town of Sharpsburg—Longstreet's command being placed on the right of the road from Sharpsburg to Boonsboroa, and D. H. Hill's command on the left. From SharpsburgSharpsburg a turnpike runs northward across the Potomac to Hagerstown, from which direction the position might the whole Confederate force concentrated at Sharpsburg, with the exception of the divisions of McLaew hundred yards of the hill which commanded Sharpsburg and our rear. I was satisfied, however, tha heights, and advance along their crest upon Sharpsburg, McClellan: Report, p. 390. as a diversiof my column arrived upon the battle-field of Sharpsburg, a distance of seventeen miles, at half-past
Rectortown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
m the other moiety by at least two days march. McClellan's next projected move was to strike across obliquely westward and interpose between the severed divisions of the Confederate force; but this step he was prevented from taking by his sudden removal from the command of the Army of the Potomac, while on the march to Warrenton. Late on the night of November 7th, amidst a heavy snow-storm, General Buckingham, arriving post-haste from Washington, reached the tent of General McClellan at Rectortown. He was the bearer of the following dispatch, which he handed to General McClellan: General orders, no. 182. War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, November 5, 1862. By direction of the President of the United States, it is ordered that Major-General McClellan be relieved from the command of the Army of the Potomac, and that Major-General Burnside take the command of that army. By order of the Secretary of War. E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General.
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
was held by a garrison of about nine thousand men, under Colonel D. H. Miles, while a force of twenty-five hundred men, under General White, did outpost duty at Martinsburg and Winchester. These troops received orders direct from General Halleck. Lee had assumed that his advance on Frederick would cause the immediate evacuation of Harper's Ferry It had been supposed that the advance upon Frederick would lead to the evacuation of Martinsburg and Harper's Ferry, thus opening the line of communication through the Valley.—Lee's Report: Reports of the Army of Northern Virginia, vol. i., p. 28. by the Union force, because that position, important as againstes so that there should be no escape for the garrison from that side, he moved down towards Harper's Ferry. On his approach, General White with the garrison of Martinsburg evacuated that place, and retired to Harper's Ferry, the rear of which, at Bolivar Heights, Jackson reached on the 13th, and immediately proceeded to put himsel
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