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Andrews Norton (search for this): chapter 18
versations with him. They ended in nothing. I talked, also, with Mr. Norton, Mr. Frisbie, and Dr. Ware, All of them professors in the Collto Mr. Lowell, and one to Judge Davis, etc. I showed it, also, to Mr. Norton, Mr. Frisbie, and Dr. Ware, who expressed themselves strongly satisfied; the first, Mr. Norton, in a long letter, and the two last verbally. Mr. Farrar thought changes unnecessary. The Corporation, in colong, and are the only memorial he ever sent to the Corporation. Mr. Norton's and Mr. Farrar's were longer, and so on. The committee to c unwilling to proceed, in this state of things, to make changes. Mr. Norton then proposed to me to print my answers, his, and Mr. Frisbie's, re was a rebellion, and forty students were sent off together. Mr. Norton and Dr. Ware then brought up the whole subject of the College, fot was foreseen as probable at the meeting at Dr. Ware's, and what Mr. Norton had long thought desirable. The committee, therefore, was appoin
Josiah Quincy (search for this): chapter 18
tion as he felt it ought to be done, and in a manner approaching that in which he had seen it done in Europe. After this period he was allowed to administer his own department in his own way, In the Tabular View issued at the beginning of each term, the Department of Modern Languages was thenceforward, while Mr. Ticknor remained at its head, entered in a separate and peculiar manner, leaving all details to the discretion of the professor. and when, after Dr. Kirkland's resignation and Mr. Quincy's advent as his successor in the Presidency, a new spirit and vigor were infused into the affairs of the College, Mr. Ticknor had no longer the same difficulties to contend with as in earlier years. He continued to labor zealously, so that, looking back afterwards, he said that he did, during those years, three quarters more work than was required of him by the statutes. He felt that the system on which he worked was successful, and often dwelt with satisfaction on the fact that, in the
une of that year I had several formal conversations with him. They ended in nothing. I talked, also, with Mr. Norton, Mr. Frisbie, and Dr. Ware, All of them professors in the College. all of whom thought great changes necessary, and the two firsf it, and gave one to the President, one to Mr. Lowell, and one to Judge Davis, etc. I showed it, also, to Mr. Norton, Mr. Frisbie, and Dr. Ware, who expressed themselves strongly satisfied; the first, Mr. Norton, in a long letter, and the two last Most of the teachers answered in the course of the autumn. My answers are dated October 23, and fill thirty pages. Mr. Frisbie's were nearly as long, and are the only memorial he ever sent to the Corporation. Mr. Norton's and Mr. Farrar's were ng to proceed, in this state of things, to make changes. Mr. Norton then proposed to me to print my answers, his, and Mr. Frisbie's, and send a copy to each of the Overseers, and try to stir them up to action; but I was not willing to proceed to su
Daniel Webster (search for this): chapter 18
; but when, in June, 1825, the changes they desired received the sanction of both the superior boards, it was thought proper that they should be explained and vindicated to the public. Mr. Ticknor, accordingly, at the request of Judge Story, Mr. Webster, and Mr. Prescott, wrote an article on the subject for the North American Review. It was already in type, when the editor of that journal —although he had invited and accepted the article-informed Mr. Ticknor that, by the advice of friends, hresident professors and tutors. This was an old controversy, recently revived. Mr. Ticknor availed himself of the ample notes from which Judge Story had made an argument on this subject before the Overseers, together with suggestions from Sir. Webster and Mr. Prescott, in order to put on record, in a permanent form, the grounds on which this question, as a matter of law, had been set at rest. He makes acknowledgment of the sources from which he drew the legal argument, in a manuscript note
George Ticknor (search for this): chapter 18
n Harvard College. The spirit with which Mr. Ticknor entered on his professorship at Harvard Colrved, and no one did more to create it than Mr. Ticknor. His interest in the improvement of edu For the consideration of these gentlemen Mr. Ticknor had drawn up a paper, the general object and invited and accepted the article-informed Mr. Ticknor that, by the advice of friends, he had deci was an old controversy, recently revived. Mr. Ticknor availed himself of the ample notes from whied from Harvard College, and whose opinions Mr. Ticknor did not share. In the interests of good leege was concerned, of the improvement which Mr. Ticknor had desired to accomplish, it left him freere infused into the affairs of the College, Mr. Ticknor had no longer the same difficulties to contles taught French during all the years that Mr. Ticknor held the professorship; and, having passed professor who appointed and directed them. Mr. Ticknor's purposes, throughout, should be judged by[17 more...]
Charles Follen (search for this): chapter 18
, or in his lecture-room; nor did he ever send up the name of any young man for reproof. The instructors under him were foreigners,—for he held strongly the opinion that a foreign language should be taught only by one to whom it is native,—yet he never found trouble arising between these teachers and the young men. M. Sales taught French during all the years that Mr. Ticknor held the professorship; and, having passed some years in Spain, he also taught Spanish so far as it was needed. Dr. Follen was, after 1825, the German instructor; Signor Bachi, the Italian; and they all worked in the same spirit with the professor who appointed and directed them. Mr. Ticknor's purposes, throughout, should be judged by the ultimate results which he expected to follow a fair trial of the new system. The division of the classes by proficiency he regarded as indispensable, so long as the strictly academic character of the College was to continue; but he supposed that it would fall away naturally
Charles Lowell (search for this): chapter 18
twenty pages, much of which is in my printed Remarks. It is dated July 31, 1821, and at his request I made copies of it, and gave one to the President, one to Mr. Lowell, and one to Judge Davis, etc. I showed it, also, to Mr. Norton, Mr. Frisbie, and Dr. Ware, who expressed themselves strongly satisfied; the first, Mr. Norton, irrar's were longer, and so on. The committee to consider these answers—amounting to nearly three hundred pages—was composed of Dr. Porter, Mr. Prescott, and Mr. Lowell, all working men. And they did work faithfully. Mr. Prescott, in particular, made an abstract of the opinions of each respondent, arranged under the appropriatd the meeting should be small, and Mr. R. Sullivan and myself were desired to call it . . . . . Nine of us therefore assembled at my house July 23, 1823. Rev. Charles Lowell, Judge Story, and Messrs. R. Sullivan and John Pickering, Overseers; Dr. James Jackson and Mr. Ticknor, present officers; Messrs. G. B. Emerson and J. G. Pa
John Lowell (search for this): chapter 18
of the Overseers, as had been requested by the vote of the Overseers. . . . . They had many meetings, some which lasted a whole day. If ever a subject was thoroughly discussed, they discussed this one thoroughly. When Judge Story had drawn up his report, he sent it to the President, with whom it remained above two months, and who returned it without desiring any alteration, or suggesting any from any other person. This report was discussed June 1, 1824, and another committee appointed (J. Lowell, Chairman) to inquire, and report further details, as the Overseers were evidently not sufficiently informed about the state of the College. . . . . . The result of the whole was, that the resident teachers again declared themselves against all but very trifling changes. The Overseers, however, after a very long discussion, passed the greater changes unanimously, and these greater changes, having been digested into the shape of laws by the Corporation, are now the basis on which the Colle
N. A. Haven (search for this): chapter 18
hat any account of his life from 1819 to 1830 must include a narrative of his exertions for that end. In a letter to Mr. Haven, written in 1825, he gives a sketch of the condition of the College, and of the efforts to improve it, beginning in 1821. Mr. Haven's forebodings about the College were often expressed to Mr. Ticknor. On the 15th of September, 1821, he wrote: I have frequently had occasion to express an opinion, which I have formed after some inquiry,—and, I need not add, with g But the College has watchful enemies, and nothing can save her from their grasp but a spotless reputation. To N. A. Haven. October 26, 1825. I take my earliest leisure to give you the account you desire to have, of the origin and manageons had weight, and were carefully considered by the gentlemen before whom he laid them. He continues his narrative to Mr. Haven as follows:— A list of above twenty questions was prepared by the contributions of all present, each one proposing
John Farrar (search for this): chapter 18
one to the President, one to Mr. Lowell, and one to Judge Davis, etc. I showed it, also, to Mr. Norton, Mr. Frisbie, and Dr. Ware, who expressed themselves strongly satisfied; the first, Mr. Norton, in a long letter, and the two last verbally. Mr. Farrar thought changes unnecessary. The Corporation, in consequence of this letter, issued a circular to all the teachers, dated September 12, 1821, containing seven pages of all possible questions, to which was afterwards added a request to each tns themselves. Most of the teachers answered in the course of the autumn. My answers are dated October 23, and fill thirty pages. Mr. Frisbie's were nearly as long, and are the only memorial he ever sent to the Corporation. Mr. Norton's and Mr. Farrar's were longer, and so on. The committee to consider these answers—amounting to nearly three hundred pages—was composed of Dr. Porter, Mr. Prescott, and Mr. Lowell, all working men. And they did work faithfully. Mr. Prescott, in particular,
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