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Sarah Austin (search for this): chapter 21
ides two members of the House of Commons; the youngest of whom, representing Liskeard, has lately made a speech in favor of the ballot, which has created quite a sensation. . . . The party was small, and the most interesting persons in it were Mrs. Austin, the translator, who seems to have a strong masculine mind,. . . . and the famous O'Connell, a stout gentleman, with a full, but rather hard, florid face, and a red wig, talking strongly and fluently upon all subjects. We could, however, sf one of the small colleges at Oxford. but you always feel, in talking with him, that you are in the grasp of a powerful mind. . . . . The conversation was uncommonly various, and the Archbishop and Sir D. Baird very entertaining. We brought Mrs. Austin home in our carriage, and had some very pleasant talk with her in a drive of three miles. July 17.—In returning a few calls this morning I went to see Sydney Smith, and found him a good deal stouter than he was when I knew him before, and w
e debate. But nobody except an Englishman would have gone through it, I think. When I arrived the Speaker was not in the chair, and the House, in committee, was considering a case of divorce, and examining two or three female witnesses. Nothing could well be more disorderly than the whole proceedings. Parts of them were indecent; and, at the best, there was much talking, laughing, and walking about; no attention paid to the business in hand, or to the speakers, though O'Connell, Spring Rice, and some other men of mark were among them; and as for dignity, deference, or propriety of any sort, it was evidently a matter not heeded at all. I sat, as a foreigner, on the floor, and had a most truly comfortable place; and talked quite at my ease, without suppressing my voice at all, with the members whom I knew, or to whom I was introduced. . . . . Finally, when Peel rose to open the debate in earnest, the House could be said to attend to the business before it. And well they might, for
e were in the long library, he took me away from the rest of the party, and asked me a great many questions about the practical operation of the ballot in the United States, and gave his opinion very freely on the relations of the two countries. He said that as we get along further from the period of our Revolution and the feelings that accompanied it, we get along easier together; that Jefferson and Madison disliked England so much that they took every opportunity to make difficulty; that Monroe was a more quiet sort of person, but that J. Q. Adams hated England; and that they much preferred the present administration, which seemed sincerely disposed to have all things easy and right. He asked if Van Buren was likely to be the next President. I told him I thought he would be. He said he was a pleasant and agreeable man, but he did not think him so able as Mr. McLane, who preceded him. As Ministers of the United States to England. He asked if there was no chance for Webster. I
etrating glance, which showed him to be always ready and vigilant. After dinner, when we were in the long library, he took me away from the rest of the party, and asked me a great many questions about the practical operation of the ballot in the United States, and gave his opinion very freely on the relations of the two countries. He said that as we get along further from the period of our Revolution and the feelings that accompanied it, we get along easier together; that Jefferson and Madison disliked England so much that they took every opportunity to make difficulty; that Monroe was a more quiet sort of person, but that J. Q. Adams hated England; and that they much preferred the present administration, which seemed sincerely disposed to have all things easy and right. He asked if Van Buren was likely to be the next President. I told him I thought he would be. He said he was a pleasant and agreeable man, but he did not think him so able as Mr. McLane, who preceded him. As
country. July 15.—I dined with Mr. T. Baring, and a small party, fitted to his fine bachelor's establishment, where nearly every person was a member of the House of Commons. The two persons I liked best, whom I had not seen before, were Sir George Grey, the principal Under Secretary for the Colonies, and Mr. Bingham Baring, eldest son of Lord Ashburton, of opposite politics, but both very intelligent men. Labouchere was there, and Wilmot, whom I had known as Secretary of Legation to Mr. Addington. The talk was chiefly on English party politics, which were discussed with entire good-humor and some raillery, the company being nearly equally divided on the points that now divide the nation. From dinner I went with Mrs. T. to Mrs. Buller's in Westminster, one of the leading old English Tory families, in which they have now both a bishop and an admiral, besides two members of the House of Commons; the youngest of whom, representing Liskeard, has lately made a speech in favor of th
David Wilkie (search for this): chapter 21
rty in the Common <*> of Trinity College, the Provost presiding. Whewell, Sir <*> Franklin, and Wilkie, the painter, were in my immediately neighborhood, and I conversed with all of them a good deal. W<*> looks very much like a fresh, undisciplined Yankee, but <*> freely and well. Wilkie is delightful, so simple, so pleasant, and, when he spoke of poor Stewart Newton, so kind and truehearted. ny. . . . . He came up to where I was standing with Moore, and talked pleasantly some time about Wilkie, and about Stewart Newton, of whom he spoke with interest. Soon, however, dinner was announced.ies; Mr. Harcourt of York; Mr. Stanley of the Derby family; Mr. Vignolles, one of the chaplains; Wilkie, the painter; and myself. . . . . When Lord Mulgrave came in he spoke to every one, not ceremoniion had stayed another day to be present at it, and we saw again there Sir John Ross, Tom Moore, Wilkie, Lady Morgan, Dr. Sands, Sir John Tobin, Dr. Lardner, One evening, during the meeting in Dubl
Samuel Romilly (search for this): chapter 21
he immense nave. It was very solemn, notwithstanding which he could not refrain from his accustomed humor and severe criticism. July 20.—Just as I was going to breakfast I received a very kind note from Mr. Rogers, asking me to come and breakfast with his old friend Whishart * Note by Mr. Ticknor: I did not then know who Whishart was; but Miss Edgeworth afterwards told me that he was a man of much talent, and one of the men of all societies in his time, the particular friend of Sir Samuel Romilly. and Professor Smyth. Professor Smyth, whom Mr. Ticknor had seen in 1819, in Cambridge; see ante, p. 271. I was very glad to go, to meet the latter especially, whom I had barely seen at Lady Lansdowne's concert. His singular appearance attracted my notice there, at first. Tall and somewhat awkward, dressed like a marquis de l'ancien regime, and looking like one, with his earlocks combed out and his hair powdered, but still with an air of great carelessness, he moved about in that
Charles Babbage (search for this): chapter 21
nd Lady Morley, fine old people of the best school of English character; the beautiful and unpretending Lady James Graham;. . . . Senior, the political economist; Babbage, the inventor of the great calculating machine, etc. . . . . We went at ten and came home at midnight, having enjoyed ourselves a good deal; for they were all, as far as I talked with them, highly cultivated, intellectual people. July 12—. . . . . . From church we went, by his especial invitation, to see Babbage's calculating machine; and I must say, that during an explanation which lasted between two and three hours, given by himself with great spirit, the wonder at its incomprehensibleesident of the last year, Lord Cloncurry, Lord Clare, Sir Alexander Creighton, Professor Robinson, Professor Hamilton, old Mr. Dalton of Manchester, Thomas Moore, Babbage, a Norwegian nobleman, a French baron, Whewell, Phillips, Prichard, the three aids, two or three other persons, and myself. When the company was assembled, Lor
indefinite intellectual activity, bold and frank in expressing all his opinions and feelings. . . . I dined at Lord Holland's, in his venerable and admirable establishment at Holland House. The party was small, but it was select. Lord and Lady Holland, and Mr. Allen; Colonel Fox, and his wife Lady Mary, the daughter of the present king; Earl Grey, who has such preponderating influence now, without being Minister; Lord Melbourne, the Premier himself; Mr. Labouchere, Henry Labouchere, afteime Minister—have suspected that any burden of the state rested on his shoulders. It struck me as singular that dinner was not at all delayed for him; so that we sat down without him and without inquiry, except that, after we were at table, Lady Holland asked Lady Cowper if her brother would not come. To which she replied, he certainly would. Even at last, when he came in, so little notice was taken of him that, though he sat opposite to me,—and the party was very small and at a round table
ubstantially to repeat it. But he did it ingeniously always, and sometimes with considerable effect; though, I think, in a person of less influence and name, it would occasionally have been thought an undignified trick. Eloquence, however, no longer works miracles. Before seven in the evening I saw eleven members of the House sound asleep at one time, notwithstanding the cheering. I did not stay to hear anybody else, but went to join Mrs. T. at a very pleasant ladies' dinner-party at Dr. Ferguson's, where I met Mr. McNeill and his wife, the sister of John Wilson, who have been in Persia, connected with the British mission there, twelve years, and were both of them, especially the husband, full of vigorous talent and a various information very curious so far west. July 22.—We had an extremely agreeable breakfast this morning. Mr. Sydney Smith, whom I had asked a few days ago, and who did not come, now volunteered, and I added my friend Kenyon, and Henry Taylor. Author of Ph
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