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Shakespeare (search for this): chapter 21
agreeable and various resources. Three or four years ago he printed, without his name, a volume called A rhymed Plea for Tolerance, which was much praised in the Edinburgh Review, and contains certainly much poetical feeling, and a most condensed mass of thought. very agreeably, meeting Mr. Robinson, Henry Crabbe Robinson. a great friend of Wordsworth, and a man famous for conversation; Mr. Harness, a popular and fashionable preacher, who has lately edited one of the small editions of Shakespeare very well; and five or six other very pleasant men. It was a genuinely English dinner, in good taste, with all the elegance of wealth, and with the intellectual refinement that belongs to one who was educated at one of their Universities, and is accustomed to the best literary society of his country. July 15.—I dined with Mr. T. Baring, and a small party, fitted to his fine bachelor's establishment, where nearly every person was a member of the House of Commons. The two persons I like
Edward Villiers (search for this): chapter 21
original, so unprepared, so fresh. Taylor said little, but Kenyon produced quite an impression on Mr. Smith, who was surprised as well as pleased, for they knew each other very little before. It was a rare enjoyment. When it was over we went regularly to see some of the London sights, which all strangers must see. . . . We arrived at home just in season to dress ourselves, and reach Kent House before dinner, where we had a most agreeable and quiet time, dining without company, with Mrs. Villiers and Mr. and Mrs. Lister, excellent and pleasant people, the two last well known by their lively books, which have been reprinted in America. While A. was listening to Mrs. Lister's music, and looking over her beautiful drawing, I made a short visit at Lord Holland's, thus making the range of our day's work extend from ten in the morning to eleven at night, and from the Thames Tunnel to Holland House, a space of nine miles. On the 25th of July, after these three weeks of excitement a
Thomas Jefferson (search for this): chapter 21
a quick, penetrating glance, which showed him to be always ready and vigilant. After dinner, when we were in the long library, he took me away from the rest of the party, and asked me a great many questions about the practical operation of the ballot in the United States, and gave his opinion very freely on the relations of the two countries. He said that as we get along further from the period of our Revolution and the feelings that accompanied it, we get along easier together; that Jefferson and Madison disliked England so much that they took every opportunity to make difficulty; that Monroe was a more quiet sort of person, but that J. Q. Adams hated England; and that they much preferred the present administration, which seemed sincerely disposed to have all things easy and right. He asked if Van Buren was likely to be the next President. I told him I thought he would be. He said he was a pleasant and agreeable man, but he did not think him so able as Mr. McLane, who precede
grace and thanks were sung, with great beauty and sweetness, by the College choir, which has the reputation of being the best in the three kingdoms. August 16.—I dined with the Lord Lieutenant, driving again through that magnificent park, two or three miles, to reach the Lodge. It was a small party, consisting only of two ladies, who seemed to be connections of Lord Mulgrave; the usual proportion of aidesde-camp and secretaries; Mr. Harcourt of York; Mr. Stanley of the Derby family; Mr. Vignolles, one of the chaplains; Wilkie, the painter; and myself. . . . . When Lord Mulgrave came in he spoke to every one, not ceremoniously, as he did the other day, but very familiarly. He sat down first, asked us to be seated, and talked very agreeably; was evidently pleased to find that his books had been printed and read in America, and said that he still had a particular liking for his old title of Lord Normanby, under which he wrote them. . . . . After the ladies had left the table he
n which Hamilton showed his metaphysical acumen against a German at table, but showed, too, that he was familiar with the labyrinth of the German writers. . . . . Certainly, for one only twenty seven or eight years old, he is a very extraordinary person. August 15.—. . . . In the evening, a grand dinner was given by the Provost and Senior Fellows of Trinity College to the Lord Lieutenant and about three hundred of the members of the Association. It was a beau finale to the splendid week Dublin has given to so many distinguished guests. We assembled in the imposing hall of Trinity Library, two hundred and eighty feet long, at six o'clock. . . . . When the company was principally assembled, I observed a little stir near the place where I stood, which nobody could explain, and which, in fact, was not comprehended by more than two or three persons present. In a moment, however, I perceived myself standing near the Lord Lieutenant and his suite, in front of whom a space had been clea
John Quincy Adams (search for this): chapter 21
e rest of the party, and asked me a great many questions about the practical operation of the ballot in the United States, and gave his opinion very freely on the relations of the two countries. He said that as we get along further from the period of our Revolution and the feelings that accompanied it, we get along easier together; that Jefferson and Madison disliked England so much that they took every opportunity to make difficulty; that Monroe was a more quiet sort of person, but that J. Q. Adams hated England; and that they much preferred the present administration, which seemed sincerely disposed to have all things easy and right. He asked if Van Buren was likely to be the next President. I told him I thought he would be. He said he was a pleasant and agreeable man, but he did not think him so able as Mr. McLane, who preceded him. As Ministers of the United States to England. He asked if there was no chance for Webster. I told him I thought there was but little. He said t
Henry Taylor (search for this): chapter 21
and a various information very curious so far west. July 22.—We had an extremely agreeable breakfast this morning. Mr. Sydney Smith, whom I had asked a few days ago, and who did not come, now volunteered, and I added my friend Kenyon, and Henry Taylor. Author of Philip Van Artevelde. Mr. Smith was in great spirits, and amused us excessively by his peculiar humor. I do not know, indeed, that anything can exceed it, so original, so unprepared, so fresh. Taylor said little, but Kenyon proTaylor said little, but Kenyon produced quite an impression on Mr. Smith, who was surprised as well as pleased, for they knew each other very little before. It was a rare enjoyment. When it was over we went regularly to see some of the London sights, which all strangers must see. . . . We arrived at home just in season to dress ourselves, and reach Kent House before dinner, where we had a most agreeable and quiet time, dining without company, with Mrs. Villiers and Mr. and Mrs. Lister, excellent and pleasant people, the two
Filipowicz (search for this): chapter 21
quite familiar with all that is now passing and doing in the world. All he says is marked by the good taste he shows in his works, and the perfected good sense which he has been almost a century in acquiring. . . . . July 10. The intervening days were busy ones, and included meetings with interesting persons, most of whom are, however, mentioned afterwards.—. . . . From two to four or five we were at a very agreeable private concert, given for the benefit of the poor Poles, by Mad. Filipowicz, who played marvellously on the violin herself. Tickets were kindly sent to us by Lady C. D., or we should have known nothing about it, and should have been sorry to have missed it, for a large number of the best singers were there,—Tamburini, Lablache, Rubini, Grisi, Malibran. . . . . Returning some visits afterwards we found Mrs. Lockhart at home, and spent some time with her and her children, whom we shall not see again on this visit, as they go to Boulogne for a month to-morrow.
Joanna Baillie (search for this): chapter 21
uch a party; Malibran, Grisi, and Rubini,—the three finest voices in Europe,—assisted by Lablache, Tamburini, etc. Malibran and Grisi were twice pitted against each other in duets, and did unquestionably all they were capable of doing to surpass each other. The effect was certainly very great. I enjoyed it vastly more than I enjoyed Almack's, for I knew a large number of people, and had a plenty of pleasant conversation. July 18.—At twelve o'clock we drove out, by appointment, to Mrs. Joanna Baillie's, at Hampstead, took our lunch with her, and passed the time at her house till four o'clock . . . . . We found her living in a small and most comfortable, nice, unpretending house, where she has dwelt for above thirty years. She is now above seventy, and, dressed with an exact and beautiful propriety, received us most gently and kindly. Her accent is still Scotch; her manner strongly marked with that peculiar modesty which you sometimes see united to the venerableness of age, and w<
Isaac Weld (search for this): chapter 21
d quite pleasant. I enjoyed it very much, for besides him, Whewell; Sir John Franklin; the Surgeon General, Mr. Crampton; Weld, the traveller in America, and now Secretary of the Dublin Society; Dr. Graves, a distinguished physician [and a professoris morning for an excursion into the county of Wicklow,. . . . and in about an hour reached the hospitable mansion of Mr. Isaac Weld, the former traveller in America, now the Secretary of the Dublin Society, which his labors have chiefly made what itelongs to the old Catholic family of Welds in England, of which the present Cardinal Weld is a leading member. . . . . Mr. Weld is a man of moderate fortune, much connected with whatever is distinguished for intelligence and science in Ireland, andinduce him to remark on it in his journal. and many more most agreeable people. . . . . At six o'clock we returned to Mr. Weld's and found dinner ready. . . . There were soon collected the Taylors, Previously mentioned by Mr. Ticknor as Mr. Joh
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