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August 9th (search for this): chapter 21
ecdote, without any of the pretensions of an author by profession, and without any of the stiffness that generally belongs to single ladies of her age and reputation. We liked her very much, and the time seemed to have been short, when at ten o'clock we drove back to Reading. Miss Mitford mentions this visit in a letter given in her Memoirs. From Reading the route led through Gloucester to the Wye, through Wales to Holyhead, and so across to Dublin, where the party arrived on the 9th of August, in time for the meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. August 10.—There is a great bustle in Dublin to-day with the opening of the fifth meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, to attend which, I am told, a thousand persons are already present. Everything, however, seems to be well prepared, and made especially comfortable and agreeable to those strangers who come from a distance. The place where all arrangements are made is th
August 10th (search for this): chapter 21
that generally belongs to single ladies of her age and reputation. We liked her very much, and the time seemed to have been short, when at ten o'clock we drove back to Reading. Miss Mitford mentions this visit in a letter given in her Memoirs. From Reading the route led through Gloucester to the Wye, through Wales to Holyhead, and so across to Dublin, where the party arrived on the 9th of August, in time for the meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. August 10.—There is a great bustle in Dublin to-day with the opening of the fifth meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, to attend which, I am told, a thousand persons are already present. Everything, however, seems to be well prepared, and made especially comfortable and agreeable to those strangers who come from a distance. The place where all arrangements are made is the large, fine examination-hall in Trinity College, where tickets are obtained, and a common lounge
t is called society, since her separation from Lord Byron, not even to accompany her daughter, who went abroad, whenever she went at all, with Mrs. Somerville. Her whole appearance and conversation gratified me very much, it was so entirely suited to her singular position in the world. We dined with my friend Kenyon In another passage of the Journal Mr. Ticknor says: Mr. Kenyon is a man of fortune and literary tastes and pursuits, about fifty years old, whom I knew on the Continent in 1817. He has travelled a great deal, and though a shy man and mixing little in general society, is a man of most agreeable and various resources. Three or four years ago he printed, without his name, a volume called A rhymed Plea for Tolerance, which was much praised in the Edinburgh Review, and contains certainly much poetical feeling, and a most condensed mass of thought. very agreeably, meeting Mr. Robinson, Henry Crabbe Robinson. a great friend of Wordsworth, and a man famous for conversa
July 2nd, 1835 AD (search for this): chapter 21
t with none of my family. Now, I carry all with me, . . . . and as I travel surrounded by my home, it seems not unreasonable to hope for a sort of enjoyment of which I then had no knowledge; and to feel sure that I shall escape that sensation of solitude and weariness which made my absence at that time all but intolerable to me. The welcome he everywhere received was very gratifying, and he entered at once on a delightful series of social excitements and pleasures. Journal Oxford, July 2, 1835.—The approach to Oxford is fine, its turrets and towers showing so magnificently from all sides; and the drive up High Street, with palaces on either hand, is one of the grandest in Europe. As soon as dinner was over I went to see Dr. Buckland, the famous geologist, Professor in the University, and Canon of Christ Church, where he has spacious and comfortable apartments for his family, including a pleasant garden. He received me with the kindness which is characteristic of his countryme
y step was full of interest. Mr. Ticknor had purchased a large travelling-carriage, more like the covered drag of the present day than like any other vehicle now seen, and, foreseeing a long use for it, had caused it to be fitted with many comforts and conveniences which English ingenuity provided for such demands. In this, always with four post-horses, he travelled for the next two years and a half, till it had become like a family mansion, to be at last given up with regret. On the 26th of July Mr. Ticknor thus describes a visit to Miss Mitford, in the neighborhood of Reading:— Journal. We found Miss Mitford living literally in a cottage, neither ornee nor poetical,—except inasmuch as it had a small garden crowded with the richest and most beautiful profusion of flowers,—where she lives with her father, a fresh, stout old man who is in his seventy-fifth year. She herself seemed about fifty, short and fat, with very gray hair, perfectly visible under her cap, and nicely a<
quiet time, dining without company, with Mrs. Villiers and Mr. and Mrs. Lister, excellent and pleasant people, the two last well known by their lively books, which have been reprinted in America. While A. was listening to Mrs. Lister's music, and looking over her beautiful drawing, I made a short visit at Lord Holland's, thus making the range of our day's work extend from ten in the morning to eleven at night, and from the Thames Tunnel to Holland House, a space of nine miles. On the 25th of July, after these three weeks of excitement and fatigue, Mr. Ticknor set out with his family for a tour through England and Wales, which, with the modes of travelling then in use, consumed much more time than would now be employed, but was, perhaps, all the more charming where every step was full of interest. Mr. Ticknor had purchased a large travelling-carriage, more like the covered drag of the present day than like any other vehicle now seen, and, foreseeing a long use for it, had caused i
e the hall. to hear the great debate of the session, the debate on the Church question of Ireland, in which the Ministry are to vindicate the wisdom of the resolution on which they turned out the Tories, and in which Sir R. Peel and his friends hope seriously, in their turn, to overthrow their successful adversaries. It will be a hardly fought field, and it is already anticipated that the contest-contrary to the old habits of the House — will be protracted through several nights. On Friday, July 24, Mr. Ticknor adds the two following notes: The debate lasted three nights, and was decided this morning between three and four o'clock by a majority of thirty-seven against Sir R. Peel.—I saw Mr. Harness when we were visiting the hall of the House of Commons on Tuesday last, at two o'clock, waiting to get into the gallery, where he remained till two in the morning, as closely wedged in as human bodies could be packed. This he endured three successive days and nights, to hear the debate
to do up all her own work, as she has lived to be so old, rather than to leave it, as she originally intended, to her executors. She led us a short distance from her house and showed us a magnificent view of London, in the midst of which, wreathed in mist, the dome of St. Paul's towered up like a vast spectre to the clouds, and seemed to be the controlling power of the dense mass of human habitations around and beneath it. It is the most imposing view of London I have ever seen. . . . . July 19, Sunday.—. . . .We went to St. Paul's and heard Sydney Smith, who had kindly given us his pew . . . . . The sermon was an admirable moral essay, to prove that righteousness has the promise of the life that now is. It was written with great condensation of thought and purity of style, and sometimes with brilliancy of phrase and expression, and it was delivered with great power and emphasis. . . . . It was by far the best sermon I ever heard in Great Britain, though I have heard Alison, Moreh
gnificence and exclusiveness. . . . The music was such as suited such a party; Malibran, Grisi, and Rubini,—the three finest voices in Europe,—assisted by Lablache, Tamburini, etc. Malibran and Grisi were twice pitted against each other in duets, and did unquestionably all they were capable of doing to surpass each other. The effect was certainly very great. I enjoyed it vastly more than I enjoyed Almack's, for I knew a large number of people, and had a plenty of pleasant conversation. July 18.—At twelve o'clock we drove out, by appointment, to Mrs. Joanna Baillie's, at Hampstead, took our lunch with her, and passed the time at her house till four o'clock . . . . . We found her living in a small and most comfortable, nice, unpretending house, where she has dwelt for above thirty years. She is now above seventy, and, dressed with an exact and beautiful propriety, received us most gently and kindly. Her accent is still Scotch; her manner strongly marked with that peculiar modesty <
om his accustomed humor and severe criticism. July 20.—Just as I was going to breakfast I received a very kind note from Mr. Rogers, asking me to come and breakfast with his old friend Whishart * Note by Mr. Ticknor: I did not then know who Whishart was; but Miss Edgeworth afterwards told me that he was a man of much talent, and one of the men of all societies in his time, the particular friend of Sir Samuel Romilly. and Professor Smyth. Professor Smyth, whom Mr. Ticknor had seen in 1819, in Cambridge; see ante, p. 271. I was very glad to go, to meet the latter especially, whom I had barely seen at Lady Lansdowne's concert. His singular appearance attracted my notice there, at first. Tall and somewhat awkward, dressed like a marquis de l'ancien regime, and looking like one, with his earlocks combed out and his hair powdered, but still with an air of great carelessness, he moved about in that brilliant assembly, hardly spoken to by a single person, with a modest and quiet ai
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