hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor 393 1 Browse Search
Elisha Ticknor 314 20 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 176 0 Browse Search
Madrid (Spain) 158 0 Browse Search
Gottingen (Lower Saxony, Germany) 150 0 Browse Search
Daniel Webster 121 1 Browse Search
France (France) 100 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 84 0 Browse Search
Wolfgang A. Von Goethe 72 0 Browse Search
Friedrich Tieck 72 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). Search the whole document.

Found 463 total hits in 205 results.

... 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
the White Bear ; Note by Mr. Ticknor: This joke, I find since, was not original with Rogers, but a nickname Whately obtained when he was head of one of the small colleges at Oxford. but you always feel, in talking with him, that you are in the grasp of a powerful mind. . . . . The conversation was uncommonly various, and the Archbishop and Sir D. Baird very entertaining. We brought Mrs. Austin home in our carriage, and had some very pleasant talk with her in a drive of three miles. July 17.—In returning a few calls this morning I went to see Sydney Smith, and found him a good deal stouter than he was when I knew him before, and with his hair grown quite white; but not a jot less amusing. He seems to think that the government of the United States was much weakened by the compromise about the tariff with South Carolina, and says that it is the opinion of the wise politicians in England. . . We dined in the city with our very kind friends the Vaughans; See ante, pp. 15 an
omfort were perfect; no ceremony, no supper, no regulation or managing, brilliantly lighted large halls, very fine music, plenty of dancing. . . . It struck me, however, that there were fewer of the leading nobility and fashion there than formerly, and that the general cast of the company was younger. I talked with Lady Cowper, Lady Minto, and Lord Falmouth, for I hardly knew any one else, and was very well pleased when, at two o'clock, the ladies declared themselves ready to come home. July 16.—We drove out to Chelsea this morning and had a very pleasant hour with Mrs. Somerville, which made me doubly sorry that constant engagements elsewhere prevent us from accepting their very kind and hearty invitations to Chelsea. . . . . They are all as simple, natural, and kind as possible. I went, too, while Mrs. Ticknor was with Mrs. Somerville, to inquire for poor Stewart Newton, and heard only of the constant failure of his strength, and the prospect of his final release, even within a
g all his opinions and feelings. . . . I dined at Lord Holland's, in his venerable and admirable establishment at Holland House. The party was small, but it was select. Lord and Lady Holland, and Mr. Allen; Colonel Fox, and his wife Lady Mary, the daughter of the present king; Earl Grey, who has such preponderating influence now, without being Minister; Lord Melbourne, the Premier himself; Mr. Labouchere, Henry Labouchere, afterwards Lord Taunton, travelled in the United States in 1824-25 with Hon. Edward Stanley,—the late Earl of Derby,—Hon. Stuart Wortley, and Evelyn Denison,—afterwards Speaker of the House of Commons and Lord Ossington,—when they all were often at Mr. Ticknor's house. another of the Ministry, who was in America, and who is now Master of the Mint and Vice-President of the Board of Trade, as well as Member of Parliament; Lord and Lady Cowper, who is sister of Lord Melbourne; and Lord Minto, lately Minister at Berlin. In the evening my old friend Murray, no
e evening I saw eleven members of the House sound asleep at one time, notwithstanding the cheering. I did not stay to hear anybody else, but went to join Mrs. T. at a very pleasant ladies' dinner-party at Dr. Ferguson's, where I met Mr. McNeill and his wife, the sister of John Wilson, who have been in Persia, connected with the British mission there, twelve years, and were both of them, especially the husband, full of vigorous talent and a various information very curious so far west. July 22.—We had an extremely agreeable breakfast this morning. Mr. Sydney Smith, whom I had asked a few days ago, and who did not come, now volunteered, and I added my friend Kenyon, and Henry Taylor. Author of Philip Van Artevelde. Mr. Smith was in great spirits, and amused us excessively by his peculiar humor. I do not know, indeed, that anything can exceed it, so original, so unprepared, so fresh. Taylor said little, but Kenyon produced quite an impression on Mr. Smith, who was surprised
Society and author of one of the Bridgewater Treatises, a first-rate man; Dr. Bostock, a leading member of the Royal Society; Mr. Hogg, who is about publishing his Travels in the East, and who told us many pleasant stories of Lady Hester Stanhope, etc. In the evening several of the Aikin family came in, and I confess I looked with some interest on the Charles of Mrs. Barbauld's Evenings at Home, though he came with a wig and two daughters, one of whom has made him already a grandfather. July 21.—At half past 4 I returned to the House of Commons, Having been there two hours before, merely to see the hall. to hear the great debate of the session, the debate on the Church question of Ireland, in which the Ministry are to vindicate the wisdom of the resolution on which they turned out the Tories, and in which Sir R. Peel and his friends hope seriously, in their turn, to overthrow their successful adversaries. It will be a hardly fought field, and it is already anticipated that the
ssing all his opinions and feelings. . . . I dined at Lord Holland's, in his venerable and admirable establishment at Holland House. The party was small, but it was select. Lord and Lady Holland, and Mr. Allen; Colonel Fox, and his wife Lady Mary, the daughter of the present king; Earl Grey, who has such preponderating influence now, without being Minister; Lord Melbourne, the Premier himself; Mr. Labouchere, Henry Labouchere, afterwards Lord Taunton, travelled in the United States in 1824-25 with Hon. Edward Stanley,—the late Earl of Derby,—Hon. Stuart Wortley, and Evelyn Denison,—afterwards Speaker of the House of Commons and Lord Ossington,—when they all were often at Mr. Ticknor's house. another of the Ministry, who was in America, and who is now Master of the Mint and Vice-President of the Board of Trade, as well as Member of Parliament; Lord and Lady Cowper, who is sister of Lord Melbourne; and Lord Minto, lately Minister at Berlin. In the evening my old friend Murray
ntity of bishops and archbishops, and both the manner and matter would have been striking anywhere. After the service was over and we were coming away, Mr. Smith came, in some unaccountable manner, out of one of the iron gates that lead into the body of the church, and went round with us, placed us under the vast dome, and showed us the effect from the end of the immense nave. It was very solemn, notwithstanding which he could not refrain from his accustomed humor and severe criticism. July 20.—Just as I was going to breakfast I received a very kind note from Mr. Rogers, asking me to come and breakfast with his old friend Whishart * Note by Mr. Ticknor: I did not then know who Whishart was; but Miss Edgeworth afterwards told me that he was a man of much talent, and one of the men of all societies in his time, the particular friend of Sir Samuel Romilly. and Professor Smyth. Professor Smyth, whom Mr. Ticknor had seen in 1819, in Cambridge; see ante, p. 271. I was very glad
go, and who has lately carried a contested election against Lord John Russell;. . . . Lord and Lady Morley, fine old people of the best school of English character; the beautiful and unpretending Lady James Graham;. . . . Senior, the political economist; Babbage, the inventor of the great calculating machine, etc. . . . . We went at ten and came home at midnight, having enjoyed ourselves a good deal; for they were all, as far as I talked with them, highly cultivated, intellectual people. July 12—. . . . . . From church we went, by his especial invitation, to see Babbage's calculating machine; and I must say, that during an explanation which lasted between two and three hours, given by himself with great spirit, the wonder at its incomprehensible powers grew upon us every moment. The first thing that struck me was its small size, being only about two feet wide, two feet deep, and two and a half high. The second very striking circumstance was the fact that the inventor himself does
ve her tell me that it was the opinion of the family and friends that my picture of her father is the best one extant, and that nothing equals it except Chantrey's bust; so that I am sure of it now, for she volunteered the remark, with all her characteristic simplicity and directness. The evening we spent very agreeably indeed, in a party collected to meet us at Mrs. Lister's. Mrs. Thomas Lister,—afterwards Lady Theresa,—sister to Lord Clarendon. After Mr. Lister's death she became, in 1844, the wife of Sir George Cornewall Lewis; and, beside her novel Dacre,—reprinted in America before 1835,—she published, in 1852, the Lives of Friends and Contemporaries of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Her beauty was celebrated. Mr. Lister was the author of Granby, Herbert Lacy, etc., and of a life of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Mr. Parker was there, whom I saw in Boston a year ago, and who has lately carried a contested election against Lord John Russell;. . . . Lord and Lady Morley, fine old
ht, it was admitted to be doubtful whether Lady Jersey would not succeed in getting it postponed, as she has a grand dinner that evening. . . . Nothing could exceed the luxury of the rechurche dinner;. . . . the gentlemen sat about an hour, when the ladies had retired; the conversation during the whole evening being very various and lively, much filled with literary allusion and spirit, and a little louder and more bruyant than it was when I was in England before, in similar company. Monday, July 13.—We all breakfasted—including Nannie—with the excellent and kind old Mr. Rogers, nobody being present except Campbell the poet, who returned two or three days ago from his A1-gerine expedition, of which, of course, he is now full. I need not say that the two hours we thus passed were extremely agreeable. The vast amount of Mr. Rogers's recollections, extending back through the best society for sixty years; his exquisite taste, expressed alike in his conversation, his books, his furnit<
... 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21