hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor 393 1 Browse Search
Elisha Ticknor 314 20 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 176 0 Browse Search
Madrid (Spain) 158 0 Browse Search
Gottingen (Lower Saxony, Germany) 150 0 Browse Search
Daniel Webster 121 1 Browse Search
France (France) 100 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 84 0 Browse Search
Wolfgang A. Von Goethe 72 0 Browse Search
Friedrich Tieck 72 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). Search the whole document.

Found 463 total hits in 205 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
York (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 21
urnished in great profusion. . . . . A Latin grace and thanks were sung, with great beauty and sweetness, by the College choir, which has the reputation of being the best in the three kingdoms. August 16.—I dined with the Lord Lieutenant, driving again through that magnificent park, two or three miles, to reach the Lodge. It was a small party, consisting only of two ladies, who seemed to be connections of Lord Mulgrave; the usual proportion of aidesde-camp and secretaries; Mr. Harcourt of York; Mr. Stanley of the Derby family; Mr. Vignolles, one of the chaplains; Wilkie, the painter; and myself. . . . . When Lord Mulgrave came in he spoke to every one, not ceremoniously, as he did the other day, but very familiarly. He sat down first, asked us to be seated, and talked very agreeably; was evidently pleased to find that his books had been printed and read in America, and said that he still had a particular liking for his old title of Lord Normanby, under which he wrote them. . . . .
Westminster (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
rincipal Under Secretary for the Colonies, and Mr. Bingham Baring, eldest son of Lord Ashburton, of opposite politics, but both very intelligent men. Labouchere was there, and Wilmot, whom I had known as Secretary of Legation to Mr. Addington. The talk was chiefly on English party politics, which were discussed with entire good-humor and some raillery, the company being nearly equally divided on the points that now divide the nation. From dinner I went with Mrs. T. to Mrs. Buller's in Westminster, one of the leading old English Tory families, in which they have now both a bishop and an admiral, besides two members of the House of Commons; the youngest of whom, representing Liskeard, has lately made a speech in favor of the ballot, which has created quite a sensation. . . . The party was small, and the most interesting persons in it were Mrs. Austin, the translator, who seems to have a strong masculine mind,. . . . and the famous O'Connell, a stout gentleman, with a full, but rath
Milton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ll on board. She was a fine British merchantman from the Baltic. Our ship, indeed, behaved nobly, and carried us through our danger as if she were conscious and proud of her success. It was a pleasure to see and to feel her power. The scene, too, was very grand and solemn, especially at midnight, when there was still a little twilight; and at two and three o'clock in the morning, when the sea was running very high, either quite black or entirely white. But, notwithstanding this, and all Milton's poetry about Mona's wizard height and the channel here, I think I shall not care to see it again, in fair weather or foul. Once safely landed on English soil, the fresh and vivid interest of travel began, which Mr. Ticknor could now enjoy, with less regretful longings for absent friends than in his youthful journeys, since he had his wife and his two little girls with him. In describing the departure from New York, whither relatives had accompanied them, and where friends gathered roun
Liverpool (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 21
proportionate value which he thus gave, in his own mind, to the different points of his experience, should not be wholly disregarded here; but the temptation is irresistible to fill many pages with the European journal, though only a very small part of the whole will appear. This journal includes 1,700 quarto pages. The journal of his first visit to Europe contains about the same number of smaller pages, more closely written. A prosperous voyage of twenty-five days from New York to Liverpool—not a long passage for those days of sailingves-sels—had an exciting conclusion, which Mr. Ticknor thus describes:— At the moment when, with a gentle breeze, we felt as if we should reach our port in a few hours, when, in fact, I was sitting quietly in the cabin, writing a letter to announce our arrival, the wind came out suddenly ahead, and almost at once blew a gale. It was not without much difficulty and tacking all day, that we got round Holyhead and the Skerries, and lay to. But<
Dublin (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
o weeks of travel. meeting of the British Association in Dublin. When Mr. Ticknor entered on his second period of Europport on it to his government; etc., etc. The Archbishop of Dublin was the most curious person to me, of course. He is tall,er to the Wye, through Wales to Holyhead, and so across to Dublin, where the party arrived on the 9th of August, in time forement of Science. August 10.—There is a great bustle in Dublin to-day with the opening of the fifth meeting of the Britisture of rank and fashion with the savants now collected in Dublin. The Provost of Trinity, as President of the Association,stories,. . . . and talking about the present condition of Dublin and its progressive improvement with apparently much knowltellectually accomplished gentleman. August 17.—We left Dublin this morning for an excursion into the county of Wicklow,. Tobin, Dr. Lardner, One evening, during the meeting in Dublin, Mr. Ticknor heard Dr. Lardner make the well-known discour
Cambria (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 21
Chapter 21: Summer in England, Wales, and Ireland. three weeks in London. Two weeks of travel. meeting of the British Association in Dublin. When Mr. Ticknor entered on his second period of European life, he resumed his former haly, after these three weeks of excitement and fatigue, Mr. Ticknor set out with his family for a tour through England and Wales, which, with the modes of travelling then in use, consumed much more time than would now be employed, but was, perhaps, antions this visit in a letter given in her Memoirs. From Reading the route led through Gloucester to the Wye, through Wales to Holyhead, and so across to Dublin, where the party arrived on the 9th of August, in time for the meeting of the Britissant daughters. Mr. Ticknor and his family made a short visit, ten days later, at the Taylors' pretty place, Coeddhu, in Wales, beside a visit at St. Asaph's. Sir William Hamilton, Sir William Hamilton sent Mr. Ticknor, as a parting souvenir, a
ts are obtained, and a common lounge and exchange is held in the morning from nine to eleven. At eleven the sections are opened. . . . . To-day, for instance, Sir John Ross expounded a theory of the Aurora Borealis, in the physical section, and Sir John Franklin with others entered into the discussion about it. Professor Griffithsnce of the awkwardness I saw, or supposed I saw, in him at first. Professor Rigaud was without much humor, but truly good-tempered and agreeable. We met there Sir John Ross, a very stout, easy, quiet gentleman of about fifty-five, with much of the air of a naval commander. While we were in the Observatory he compared with the timmpetre given by Mr. and Mrs. Putland. . . . . A great many of the members of the Association had stayed another day to be present at it, and we saw again there Sir John Ross, Tom Moore, Wilkie, Lady Morgan, Dr. Sands, Sir John Tobin, Dr. Lardner, One evening, during the meeting in Dublin, Mr. Ticknor heard Dr. Lardner make the w
Philip Artevelde (search for this): chapter 21
, where I met Mr. McNeill and his wife, the sister of John Wilson, who have been in Persia, connected with the British mission there, twelve years, and were both of them, especially the husband, full of vigorous talent and a various information very curious so far west. July 22.—We had an extremely agreeable breakfast this morning. Mr. Sydney Smith, whom I had asked a few days ago, and who did not come, now volunteered, and I added my friend Kenyon, and Henry Taylor. Author of Philip Van Artevelde. Mr. Smith was in great spirits, and amused us excessively by his peculiar humor. I do not know, indeed, that anything can exceed it, so original, so unprepared, so fresh. Taylor said little, but Kenyon produced quite an impression on Mr. Smith, who was surprised as well as pleased, for they knew each other very little before. It was a rare enjoyment. When it was over we went regularly to see some of the London sights, which all strangers must see. . . . We arrived at home just
George Ticknor (search for this): chapter 21
gves-sels—had an exciting conclusion, which Mr. Ticknor thus describes:— At the moment when, wih and vivid interest of travel began, which Mr. Ticknor could now enjoy, with less regretful longinLord Ossington,—when they all were often at Mr. Ticknor's house. another of the Ministry, who was iKenyon In another passage of the Journal Mr. Ticknor says: Mr. Kenyon is a man of fortune and li, and kind as possible. I went, too, while Mrs. Ticknor was with Mrs. Somerville, to inquire for po with his old friend Whishart * Note by Mr. Ticknor: I did not then know who Whishart was; but al, where I heard Agassiz When Agassiz and Ticknor became close and faithful friends, a few year One evening, during the meeting in Dublin, Mr. Ticknor heard Dr. Lardner make the well-known discoted the Taylors, Previously mentioned by Mr. Ticknor as Mr. John Taylor, the geologist, and main with his wife and two pleasant daughters. Mr. Ticknor and his family made a short visit, ten days[16 more...
Herbert Lacy (search for this): chapter 21
directness. The evening we spent very agreeably indeed, in a party collected to meet us at Mrs. Lister's. Mrs. Thomas Lister,—afterwards Lady Theresa,—sister to Lord Clarendon. After Mr. Lister's death she became, in 1844, the wife of Sir George Cornewall Lewis; and, beside her novel Dacre,—reprinted in America before 1835,—she published, in 1852, the Lives of Friends and Contemporaries of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Her beauty was celebrated. Mr. Lister was the author of Granby, Herbert Lacy, etc., and of a life of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Mr. Parker was there, whom I saw in Boston a year ago, and who has lately carried a contested election against Lord John Russell;. . . . Lord and Lady Morley, fine old people of the best school of English character; the beautiful and unpretending Lady James Graham;. . . . Senior, the political economist; Babbage, the inventor of the great calculating machine, etc. . . . . We went at ten and came home at midnight, having enjoyed ourselves
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...