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she became, in 1844, the wife of Sir George Cornewall Lewis; and, beside her novel Dacre,—reprinted in America before 1835,—she published, in 1852, the Lives of Friends and Contemporaries of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Her beauty was celebrated. Mr. Lister was the author of Granby, Herbert Lacy, etc., and of a life of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Mr. Parker was there, whom I saw in Boston a year ago, and who has lately carried a contested election against Lord John Russell;. . . . Lord and Lady Morley, fine old people of the best school of English character; the beautiful and unpretending Lady James Graham;. . . . Senior, the political economist; Babbage, the inventor of the great calculating machine, etc. . . . . We went at ten and came home at midnight, having enjoyed ourselves a good deal; for they were all, as far as I talked with them, highly cultivated, intellectual people. July 12—. . . . . . From church we went, by his especial invitation, to see Babbage's calculating machin<
on about the reconciliation of geology and the Scriptures, which was delivered in so low a voice that almost nobody heard it. Of course we soon—after in vain endeavoring to listen—began to talk, for which I was extremely well situated, having Mr. Tom Moore for my next neighbor. I found him a little fellow, as we all know him to be, very amiable, I should think, and quite pleasant. I enjoyed it very much, for besides him, Whewell; Sir John Franklin; the Surgeon General, Mr. Crampton; Weld, theear the village of Bray,. . . . we set off for a dejeuner and fete champetre given by Mr. and Mrs. Putland. . . . . A great many of the members of the Association had stayed another day to be present at it, and we saw again there Sir John Ross, Tom Moore, Wilkie, Lady Morgan, Dr. Sands, Sir John Tobin, Dr. Lardner, One evening, during the meeting in Dublin, Mr. Ticknor heard Dr. Lardner make the well-known discourse in which he pronounced it to be impossible that a steamboat should ever cros
William Hamilton (search for this): chapter 21
whatever is done in mining in England and elsewhere, with his wife and two pleasant daughters. Mr. Ticknor and his family made a short visit, ten days later, at the Taylors' pretty place, Coeddhu, in Wales, beside a visit at St. Asaph's. Sir William Hamilton, Sir William Hamilton sent Mr. Ticknor, as a parting souvenir, a copy of a sonnet, written by him on the occasion of his receiving the honor of knighthood, just described, which Mr. Ticknor always regarded as one of the finest sonnets iSir William Hamilton sent Mr. Ticknor, as a parting souvenir, a copy of a sonnet, written by him on the occasion of his receiving the honor of knighthood, just described, which Mr. Ticknor always regarded as one of the finest sonnets in the English language. It has since appeared in an article on the character and genius of this very extraordinary man, in the Dublin University Magazine for January, 1842. Sir John and Lady Franklin, and several other interesting people, with whom we passed a delightful evening.
, and reputed one of the first naturalists in the world-discuss the question of fossil remains of fishes. He did it in French, plainly, distinctly, and with beauty of phrase. He is still young, and was greatly applauded, as were Sedgwick and Murchison when they followed and eulogized him. I was very much pleased with the whole scene. I dined with Lord Mulgrave, the Lord Lieutenant, in the Government House, in the magnificent Phoenix Park. I had been for some days engaged to dine with Mr. Litton, a leading member of the bar, but an invitation from the Viceroy, like an invitation from the King, is in the nature of a command. . .. . The ceremonies of the dinner were regal. The aides-de-camp, three in number, received us in a rich saloon, which we entered through a suite of apartments. . . . . A few minutes after seven there were about twenty-five persons in the room. It was an agreeable mixture of rank and fashion with the savants now collected in Dublin. The Provost of Trinity,
he is still entirely simple, frank, and kindly. I was much gratified to have her tell me that it was the opinion of the family and friends that my picture of her father is the best one extant, and that nothing equals it except Chantrey's bust; so that I am sure of it now, for she volunteered the remark, with all her characteristic simplicity and directness. The evening we spent very agreeably indeed, in a party collected to meet us at Mrs. Lister's. Mrs. Thomas Lister,—afterwards Lady Theresa,—sister to Lord Clarendon. After Mr. Lister's death she became, in 1844, the wife of Sir George Cornewall Lewis; and, beside her novel Dacre,—reprinted in America before 1835,—she published, in 1852, the Lives of Friends and Contemporaries of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Her beauty was celebrated. Mr. Lister was the author of Granby, Herbert Lacy, etc., and of a life of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Mr. Parker was there, whom I saw in Boston a year ago, and who has lately carried a contest
J. G. Lockhart (search for this): chapter 21
entioned afterwards.—. . . . From two to four or five we were at a very agreeable private concert, given for the benefit of the poor Poles, by Mad. Filipowicz, who played marvellously on the violin herself. Tickets were kindly sent to us by Lady C. D., or we should have known nothing about it, and should have been sorry to have missed it, for a large number of the best singers were there,—Tamburini, Lablache, Rubini, Grisi, Malibran. . . . . Returning some visits afterwards we found Mrs. Lockhart at home, and spent some time with her and her children, whom we shall not see again on this visit, as they go to Boulogne for a month to-morrow. She is grown a matronly woman since I saw her, and her boy, Walter, is a fine little fellow, with his grandfather's long upper lip; but in other respects she is little changed. Her Scotch accent is as broad as ever, and she is still entirely simple, frank, and kindly. I was much gratified to have her tell me that it was the opinion of the f
ho gave a discussion about the reconciliation of geology and the Scriptures, which was delivered in so low a voice that almost nobody heard it. Of course we soon—after in vain endeavoring to listen—began to talk, for which I was extremely well situated, having Mr. Tom Moore for my next neighbor. I found him a little fellow, as we all know him to be, very amiable, I should think, and quite pleasant. I enjoyed it very much, for besides him, Whewell; Sir John Franklin; the Surgeon General, Mr. Crampton; Weld, the traveller in America, and now Secretary of the Dublin Society; Dr. Graves, a distinguished physician [and a professor in the University of Dublin], were close to me. The Lord Lieutenant [Lord Mulgrave] sat directly in front of us, dressed in a full military uniform ornamented with stars that blazed with diamonds over his whole breast. He is only thirty-eight years old, looks younger, is graceful and easy in his manners, and received the abundant applause occasionally bestowed
George Cornewall Lewis (search for this): chapter 21
e opinion of the family and friends that my picture of her father is the best one extant, and that nothing equals it except Chantrey's bust; so that I am sure of it now, for she volunteered the remark, with all her characteristic simplicity and directness. The evening we spent very agreeably indeed, in a party collected to meet us at Mrs. Lister's. Mrs. Thomas Lister,—afterwards Lady Theresa,—sister to Lord Clarendon. After Mr. Lister's death she became, in 1844, the wife of Sir George Cornewall Lewis; and, beside her novel Dacre,—reprinted in America before 1835,—she published, in 1852, the Lives of Friends and Contemporaries of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Her beauty was celebrated. Mr. Lister was the author of Granby, Herbert Lacy, etc., and of a life of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Mr. Parker was there, whom I saw in Boston a year ago, and who has lately carried a contested election against Lord John Russell;. . . . Lord and Lady Morley, fine old people of the best school of
Jacob Abbott (search for this): chapter 21
extremely agreeable conversazione. Tea was over when we entered, and no refreshment was offered afterwards, but the talk was excellent, and spirited. Dr. Chalmers was curious and acute about our poor-laws, and knew a good deal about the United States; praised Dr. Channing for his intellectual power and eloquence, and considered his mind of the first order; thought Stuart the ablest man in America on the other side of the theological discussions going on there; and placed a great value on Abbott's Young Christian, and his other practical works. He is, I think, much gratified with the attentions shown him at Oxford, which seem to have been abundant for a week, and which might indeed flatter any man; but he also seems plain, straightforward, and sincere, speaking his broad Scotch as honestly as possible, and expressing his own opinions faithfully, but entirely considerate of the opinions and feelings of others. Mr. Gilbert's enthusiasm is more prompt and obvious than that of Dr. C
Richard Porson (search for this): chapter 21
seems to think that the government of the United States was much weakened by the compromise about the tariff with South Carolina, and says that it is the opinion of the wise politicians in England. . . We dined in the city with our very kind friends the Vaughans; See ante, pp. 15 and 55. and I was much gratified to find that, notwithstanding Mr. W. Vaughan's great age, he is, excepting deafness, quite well preserved. . . . . We met there, too, my old friend Mr. Maltby, the successor of Porson as Librarian of the London Institution, whom I had formerly known both here and in Italy, still full of the abundance of his learning and zeal. The evening, from a little after ten to half past 1, we spent at the Marchioness of Lansdowne's, who gave a grand concert. The house itself, with its fine grounds filling the whole of one side of Berkeley Square, is not surpassed by any in London . . . . . It was of course, in the phrase of the town, a select party, and was on the highest scale o
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