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Richard Yorke (search for this): chapter 22
and played a little whist. . . . . Before we went to bed Lord Fitzwilliam and the ladies urged us so kindly and earnestly to return to them on Saturday, and meet Lord Spencer,. . . . that we promised to do so. . . . . I shall be very glad to see this distinguished statesman so quietly and familiarly. September 29.—We left Wentworth House to-day, after having enjoyed as much really considerate kindness as we ever enjoyed anywhere in four days, and came thirty-five miles,. . . . to Colonel Richard Yorke's, at Wighill Park. . . . October 3.—In the course of the four days we stayed at Wighill Park there were about twenty different inmates in the house. Note by Mr. Ticknor: When I look back upon this visit, it seems as if I were recollecting some of the descriptions of parties in country-houses in English novels, so much truer are they to nature than is generally imagined. It was a very pleasant party, whose chief attraction and amusement was music. . . . Sir Francis Doyle, an ol
Chapter 22: Edgeworthtown. English lakes.-York. Doncaster. Wentworth house. Journal. August 21.—We set out pretty early this morning to make a visit, by invitation, to the Edgeworths, at Edgeworthtown, sixty-five English miles from Dublin. . . . The whole country we passed through was like a succession of prairies, so little inequality was there in the surface, and it was only at rare intervals we even saw any tolerably sized hills in the horizon. Nor were the objects ffairs. His conversation was very various, sometimes quite remarkable, but never rich or copious like Wordsworth's, and never humorous or witty. It was rather abundant in matters of fact, and often in that way quite striking and effective. . . . York, September 6.—We arrived here early, and established ourselves in the narrow, but neat and comfortable lodgings which we had previously secured for the Musical Festival week. The city, though old, seemed beautifully clean; and the streets, though
William Wordsworth (search for this): chapter 22
ph's.—At Ambleside we found a kind note from Wordsworth, inviting us to come directly to him. I walkt, as I anticipated, a house of trouble. Mrs. Wordsworth's sister died a few weeks ago; Mr. WordswMr. Wordsworth's sister—a person of much talent—lies at the point of death, and his daughter is suffering undever. But they received me—I mean Mr. and Mrs. Wordsworth, their daughter, and their two sons—with ts, did not seem to recall their sorrows. Wordsworth was very agreeable. He talked about politicor us to go up to Rydal and breakfast with Mr. Wordsworth, he came and breakfasted with us. His talkand we parted and came back to Ambleside. Wordsworth, as usual, talked the whole time. He showede drove from Ambleside she accompanied us to Wordsworth's, where we passed a couple of hours very ags surprised to find him less desponding than Wordsworth, though perhaps more excited. He says, howee remarkable, but never rich or copious like Wordsworth's, and never humorous or witty. It was r
Commons. Third Earl Spencer. He had arrived about an hour before us, and was still standing before the fire in his travelling-dress. He is about fifty-three years old, short, thick-set, with a dark red complexion, black hair, beginning to turn gray, a very ordinary, farmer-like style of dress, and no particularly vivacious expression of countenance. His manner was as quiet and simple as possible, perfectly willing to talk, but not seeming to have much to say. We were presented also to Mr. Wood, I believe a son-in-law of Lord Grey, and to Mr. Chaloner, a brother-in-law of Lord Fitzwilliam, who is here with his wife, a daughter of the late Lord Dundas, and a son and daughter. We found too the Dundases, whom we left here on Tuesday, and a Mr. Phillips, Thomas J. Phillips, Esq. a fine scholar-like young man, and Mr. Frederic Ponsonby, of the Besborough family. . . . . Lord Spencer, whom I sat near at dinner, was very agreeable. We talked about the hunting season, which is now
onishing how distinctly a single voice is heard, even in its lowest and sweetest tones, through nearly every part of this wide pile; and the stillness of the multitudes to catch its murmurs is sometimes as thrilling as the notes themselves. Grisi can fill the whole building with the most brilliant sounds. We dined at Lord Fitzwilliam's, who has taken a large house just outside the gates, for the Festival week, which he thinks it his inherited duty to patronize. . . . . September 12.—Mr. Willis of Caius College, Cambridge, who has published on architecture, being here, and desirous to see some parts of the cathedral not usually seen, Mr. Harcourt had it opened and lighted, and a party was formed to go over it. It was very curious. We were shown, under the pavement of the present choir, the remains of the ancient choir of the church built in 1070 and burnt in 1137, together with one arch of the still older church built about A. D. 900, all discovered in 1830, when the excavations
David Wilkie (search for this): chapter 22
agreeable a dinner as we well could have, talking upon all sorts of subjects until very late, with great vivacity. . . . . English kindness was uniform and consistent to the last, but I do not recollect anything worth noting except a visit to Wilkie, the painter, at Kensington, to which he invited me at Dublin. I found him living very comfortably, but very much like an artist. With great good-nature and a strong desire to please, not unmixed with Scotch shrewdness, he talked a good deal anis profession, and showed me a quantity of rough sketches, and two pictures now in progress. Of the sketches, those he made in Spain are the most picturesque; those he has lately made in Ireland are the most interesting. . . . . It is evidently Wilkie's theory and purpose to find out what is striking and characteristic in his own times, and turn them to account on canvas, by showing them in a poetical light, and on their picturesque side. Of late he has been more ambitious in his subjects, th
, the poet, to meet us, and that they had proposed to make a party for Sheffield to go with us, so that we altered our plan. . . . . After breakfast we went over some other parts of this vast pile of building, saw the state sleeping-apartments, which are magnificent, and many other suites of rooms that are very rich and comfortable. . . . The saloon fitted up by the present Lord Fitzwilliam is very rich and magnificent. On one side of it hangs the famous picture of Lord Rockingham's horse Whistler, by Stubbs, nearly as large as life, and one of the most striking pictures of an animal I ever saw. It is nothing but a painting of a horse, no trappings, no background, no earth, yet it does not leave any feeling of deficiency. Lord Fitzwilliam told me that when the horse was painted Lord Rockingham intended to have put George III. upon him; but, said he, laughing, the king misbehaved about that time, and so Lord Rockingham would not have him there. However, he added, that is a story I
Britannia Wellington (search for this): chapter 22
as the eye could follow them, often stopped us several minutes at a time .. . . . It was a part of our amusement, during an hour or more we were in reaching the Tower, to watch these different currents, embarrassments, and contests of the different sorts of passengers. At last we arrived, and, passing the drawbridge, drove through streets and ways that seemed quite long, to the Governor's house. It is one of the examples of the pleasant abuses with which England abounds, that the Duke of Wellington is Governor of the Tower, with a good salary, and knows nothing about it; that Sir Francis Doyle is his lieutenant, with another large salary, and resides there only two months in the year; and that somebody else, with a third salary, is the really efficient and responsible person. . . . . Lunch was ready immediately, and as soon as it was ended, Sir Francis and Miss Doyle went over the Tower with us, visiting chiefly those parts not shown to strangers, as we had seen the rest. . . . .
Charles Waterton (search for this): chapter 22
ppointment, and added to every interest and enjoyment in the next two days by his delightful union of talent, simplicity, quaint humor, and most winning kindliness. Mr. Gaskell had been Member of Parliament for Malden, and his son at this time represented Shropshire. The whole family were rich in cultivation, refinement, and hospitality, and the establishment elegant and luxurious. Immediately after lunch [on the first day] Mrs. Gaskell carried us to the house of that strange person, Mr. Waterton, whose Wanderings in South America excited so much remark a few years ago. He is an anomaly; a thorough Catholic, and holding the most despotic theories of government, yet a radical at home, in order to overturn everything now existing in England; living a large part of his time in the woods, with the habits and the sharpened instincts of a savage, and yet with a fine, comfortable, English establishment, full of servants and luxuries; a man of an old family and large hereditary property
Edward Villiers (search for this): chapter 22
here, by Lord Mulgrave's invitation, given at Dublin, the party were received by Mr. and Mrs. Edward Villiers, Mrs. Edward Villiers was a sister of Lady Mulgrave,Mrs. Edward Villiers, Mrs. Edward Villiers was a sister of Lady Mulgrave, and Mr. Villiers a brother of Mrs. Lister, a highly intellectual person, with large and pleasant resources in belles-lettres knowledge, whom, says Mr. Ticknor, I thoMrs. Edward Villiers was a sister of Lady Mulgrave, and Mr. Villiers a brother of Mrs. Lister, a highly intellectual person, with large and pleasant resources in belles-lettres knowledge, whom, says Mr. Ticknor, I thought quite equal to any of the family for talent, beside which he is a better scholar than any of them. then staying there. On September 18, the day following theiMr. Villiers a brother of Mrs. Lister, a highly intellectual person, with large and pleasant resources in belles-lettres knowledge, whom, says Mr. Ticknor, I thought quite equal to any of the family for talent, beside which he is a better scholar than any of them. then staying there. On September 18, the day following their arrival at Mulgrave Castle, Mr. Ticknor says:— We began our excursion by stopping in a small village belonging to Lord Mulgrave. We wished to get a little infrmation from the clergyman, but he was not at home. I was sorry for it, for Mr. Villiers told me he is one of the last specimens now remaining of Fieldings Parson Adext day, at Kirby Moorside, Mr. Ticknor was shown a common-looking house where Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, died, whose death is thus recorded in the parish register
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