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hich, as it is so characteristic, and, besides,—coming to me only at second-hand, from his aid who brought the despatches,—so surely authentic, that I cannot choose but record it. During the first and second days, By the first and second days Major Percy must have meant the battle at Quatre Bras on the 16th and the retreat to Waterloo on the 17th. The battle of Waterloo was begun and ended in one day. said Major Percy, we had the worst of the battle, and thought we should lose it. On the third and great day, from the time when the attack commenced in the morning until five o'clock in the evening, we attempted nothing but to repel the French. During all this time we suffered most terribly, and three times during the course of the day we thought nothing remained to us but to sell our lives as dearly as possible. Under every charge the Duke of Wellington remained nearly in the same spot; gave his orders, but gave no opinion,—expressed no anxiety,—showed, indeed, no signs of feelin
affairs, that required his presence in England, he should have fulfilled. The English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, he told me, he wrote at his paternal estate in the country, the winter before he set forth on his travels, while a heavy fall of snow was on the ground, and he kept house for a month, during which time he never saw the light of day, rising in the evening after dark, and going to bed in the morning before dawn. The Corsair, he told me, he wrote in eleven days, and copied on the twelfth, and added, that whenever he undertook anything, he found it necessary to devote all his thoughts to it until he had finished it. This is the reason why he can never finish his Childe Harold. It is so long since he laid it aside, that he said it would now be entirely impossible for him to resume it. From some of his remarks, I think it not unlikely that he may next turn his thoughts to the stage, though it would be impossible, in a mind constituted like his, to predict the future from the
ountrymen, who have just returned from France and Germany. But not only Americans, but Englishmen go every day to the Continent, without molestation. I pray you, therefore, be perfectly easy, for I shall run no risk .... We left Liverpool on the 17th, and arrived here on the 25th, and are just settled in our respective lodgings, and ready to present our letters of introduction. Journal. May 30.—To-day I dined at Mr. William Vaughan's, the brother of Mr. Benjamin Vaughan, of Hallowell, brought the despatches,—so surely authentic, that I cannot choose but record it. During the first and second days, By the first and second days Major Percy must have meant the battle at Quatre Bras on the 16th and the retreat to Waterloo on the 17th. The battle of Waterloo was begun and ended in one day. said Major Percy, we had the worst of the battle, and thought we should lose it. On the third and great day, from the time when the attack commenced in the morning until five o'clock in the
ity which knows no changes of war or peace. Besides, Americans are now treated with the most distinguished kindness and courtesy wherever they are known to be such. This I know from the testimony of very many of our countrymen, who have just returned from France and Germany. But not only Americans, but Englishmen go every day to the Continent, without molestation. I pray you, therefore, be perfectly easy, for I shall run no risk .... We left Liverpool on the 17th, and arrived here on the 25th, and are just settled in our respective lodgings, and ready to present our letters of introduction. Journal. May 30.—To-day I dined at Mr. William Vaughan's, the brother of Mr. Benjamin Vaughan, of Hallowell, and of Mr. John Vaughan, of Philadelphia, and as actively kind and benevolent as either of them. Dr. Rees, the editor of the Cyclopaedia, was there, and, though now past seventy, and oppressed with the hydrothorax, he still retains so much of the vigor and vivacity of youth, tha
letter he ever wrote,—the letter to his wife,—which, if I recollect right, concludes Dr. Currie's collection. These papers, Mr. Roscoe seems to preserve with a sort of holy reverence, and he read me from among them several characteristic love-letters, and some Jacobite pieces of poetry, which have never been, and never will be published, with a degree of feeling which would have moved me in one of my own age, and was doubly interesting in an old man. Mr. Ticknor left Liverpool on the 17th of May, and arrived in London on the 25th of the same month, travelling in the leisurely style of those days; passing through Chester, St. Asaph's, Llangollen, Shrewsbury, Birmingham, and Warwick; everywhere charmed with the aspect of a rich and cultivated country glowing with the bloom and verdure of an English spring. In addition to a copious correspondence with relatives and friends at home, it was his custom to keep full journals of his life and experiences during his whole residence in Eur
urtesy wherever they are known to be such. This I know from the testimony of very many of our countrymen, who have just returned from France and Germany. But not only Americans, but Englishmen go every day to the Continent, without molestation. I pray you, therefore, be perfectly easy, for I shall run no risk .... We left Liverpool on the 17th, and arrived here on the 25th, and are just settled in our respective lodgings, and ready to present our letters of introduction. Journal. May 30.—To-day I dined at Mr. William Vaughan's, the brother of Mr. Benjamin Vaughan, of Hallowell, and of Mr. John Vaughan, of Philadelphia, and as actively kind and benevolent as either of them. Dr. Rees, the editor of the Cyclopaedia, was there, and, though now past seventy, and oppressed with the hydrothorax, he still retains so much of the vigor and vivacity of youth, that I think he may yet live to complete the great work he has undertaken. He is a specimen, in excellent preservation, of th
t flattery, to Dr. Johnson's heart. Dr. Rees said, that long before Johnson's death it was understood that Boswell was to be his biographer, and that he always courted Boswell more than anybody else, that he might be sure of the point of view in which he was to be exhibited to posterity. Boswell, in his turn, ruined his fortune and alienated the affections of his wife, by living so much of his time—at considerable expense—in London, that he might be near his subject and in good society. June 6.—We dined at Mr. Vaughan's with several men of letters, but I saw little of them, excepting Mr. Sharp, formerly a Member of Parliament, and who, from his talents in society, has been called Conversation Sharp. He has been made an associate of most of the literary clubs in London, from the days of Burke down to the present time. He told me a great many amusing anecdotes of them, and particularly of Burke, Porson, and Grattan, with whom he had been intimate; and occupied the dinner-time as p<
acbeth. If we should fail? Lady Macbeth. We fail. But screw your courage to the sticking place, And we'll not fail. No, said Henderson, on hearing her read it thus, that is inconsistent with Lady Macbeth's character. She never permits herself to doubt their success, and least of all when arguing with her husband. Read it thus, Mrs. Siddons:— Macbeth. If we should fail? Lady Macbeth (with contempt). We fail? But screw your courage to the sticking place And we'll not fail. June 7.—This morning I breakfasted with Mr. Sharp, and had a continuation of yesterday,—more pleasant accounts of the great men of the present day, and more amusing anecdotes of the generation that has passed away. After breakfast he carried me through the Stock Exchange into the London Exchange, the square area of a large stone pile built in the time of Charles II.; from there to Lloyd's Coffee-House, and finally to Guildhall.Zzz To Mr. And Mrs. Ticknor. London, June 8, 1815. . . . . I c<
June 13th (search for this): chapter 3
t any rate at home, and I fear may have some wearisome hours in your solitude. Would that I could be with you, to relieve them of some of their tediousness. . . . . England and London have much more than satisfied my expectations, as far as I have seen them, which is only on the surface. The country is much more beautiful than I thought any country could be, and the people to whom I have presented letters are much less cold, and more kind and hospitable, than I expected them to be. June 13.—I breakfasted this morning with Sir Humphry Davy, of whom we have heard so much in America. He is now about thirty-three, but with all the freshness and bloom of five-and-twenty, and one of the handsomest men I have seen in England. He has a great deal of vivacity,—talks rapidly, though with great precision, —and is so much interested in conversation, that his excitement amounts to nervous impatience, and keeps him in constant motion. He has just returned from Italy, and delights to tal<
June 15th (search for this): chapter 3
she has all Corinne's talents without her faults or extravagances. After breakfast Sir Humphry took me to the Royal Institution, where he used to lecture before he married a woman of fortune and fashion, and where he still goes every day to perform chemical experiments for purposes of research. He showed me the library and model-room, his own laboratory and famous galvanic troughs, and at two o'clock took me to a lecture there, by Sir James Smith, on botany, —very good and very dull. June 15.—As her husband had invited me to do, I called this morning on Lady Davy. I found her in her parlor, working on a dress, the contents of her basket strewed about the table, and looking more like home than anything since I left it. She is small, with black eyes and hair, a very pleasant face, an uncommonly sweet smile, and, when she speaks, has much spirit and expression in her countenance. Her conversation is agreeable, particularly in the choice and variety of her phraseology, and has mo
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