hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor 393 1 Browse Search
Elisha Ticknor 314 20 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 176 0 Browse Search
Madrid (Spain) 158 0 Browse Search
Gottingen (Lower Saxony, Germany) 150 0 Browse Search
Daniel Webster 121 1 Browse Search
France (France) 100 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 84 0 Browse Search
Wolfgang A. Von Goethe 72 0 Browse Search
Friedrich Tieck 72 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). Search the whole document.

Found 454 total hits in 163 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Hannover (Lower Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 3
st he carried me through the Stock Exchange into the London Exchange, the square area of a large stone pile built in the time of Charles II.; from there to Lloyd's Coffee-House, and finally to Guildhall.Zzz To Mr. And Mrs. Ticknor. London, June 8, 1815. . . . . I cannot tell you how happy your letters have made me. It is all well, and I am sure home must still be to you what it always has been to me, the place of all content and happiness. You, my dear father, are now, I suppose, at Hanover, and I know all that you are enjoying there. . . . . Tell the children how dear they will be to me wherever I may go, and do not suffer them to forget me, for there are few things I should dread so much as to return, after my long and wearisome absence, and find the little hearts that parted from me in so much affection receiving me as a stranger. You, dear mother, are at any rate at home, and I fear may have some wearisome hours in your solitude. Would that I could be with you, to reliev
Allerton (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
th of the Mersey, and told us that Bonaparte was in Paris, and that everything was preparing for a general war against him. Having been bred in the strictest school of Federalism, I felt as the great majority of the English people felt, in that anxious crisis of their national affairs; but, on reaching Liverpool, I soon found that not a few people looked upon the matter quite differently. Mr. Roscoe, mild and philosophical in his whole character, was opposed to the war, and, at a dinner at Allerton, gave the usual whig argument against it, in a manner that very much surprised me. On my way up to London I stopped at Hatton, and made a visit to Dr. Parr. He certainly was not very gentle or philosophic in his opposition. Sir, said he, in his solemn, dogmatical manner, with his peculiar lisp, which always had something droll about it,—thir, I should not think I had done my duty, if I went to bed any night without praying for the success of Napoleon Bonaparte. Another fact belongin
Gottingen (Lower Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 3
ord Byron. anecdotes of Bonaparte. Mr. Murray. Mr. West. Mr. Campbell. Mrs. Siddons. leaves London. arrival in Gottingen. Mr. Ticknor was now twenty-three years old, in full vigor of health and activity of mind, having faithfully used hifrom Mr. and Mrs. Perkins, and Mr. and Miss Haven; and with Mr. Everett and young Perkins, To be placed at school in Gottingen. went on his way to Gottingen. Of this parting, he says: It was not, indeed, like the bitterness of leaving home, butGottingen. Of this parting, he says: It was not, indeed, like the bitterness of leaving home, but it was all else, and, indeed, in the sense of desolation, the same. For more than three months we had lived together as one family, . . . . and the affections which had long existed were ripened into the nearest intimacy. On the 13th of July, a could not exist two days longer; and yet nothing can be more absurd, though I am sure nothing can be more natural, than these feelings and fears. . . . . From Amsterdam he proceeded directly to Gottingen, where he arrived on the 4th of August.
Haarlem (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 3
ame delightful party of friends with whom he had crossed the ocean, and, crossing by Harwich, landed at Helvoetsluys. There, he says, We took the only two machines in the village,—a coach, which seemed to be without springs, and a wagon, which did not even pretend to have any,—to transport us to Rotterdam. Our road, the whole distance, went over a dyke, and some portions of it were on the coast, where the broad ocean leans against the land. From Rotterdam, they went to the Hague, Leyden, Haarlem, Amsterdam, and Utrecht, where he parted from Mr. and Mrs. Perkins, and Mr. and Miss Haven; and with Mr. Everett and young Perkins, To be placed at school in Gottingen. went on his way to Gottingen. Of this parting, he says: It was not, indeed, like the bitterness of leaving home, but it was all else, and, indeed, in the sense of desolation, the same. For more than three months we had lived together as one family, . . . . and the affections which had long existed were ripened into the
Ilva (Italy) (search for this): chapter 3
ling he observed on his arrival in England. In May, 1815, I arrived in Liverpool. When I left Boston, Bonaparte was in Elba, and all Europe in a state of profound peace. The pilot came on board as we approached the mouth of the Mersey, and toldnaparte, which, from the source from which he had it, is likely to be true. Lord Ebrington, son of Lord Fortescue, was in Elba, and Bonaparte, finding he was the nephew of Lord Grenville, asked him to dinner. Nobody was present but Drouot, who soonsity. Soon after this they separated. There was a Captain Fuller present, who was in one of the frigates stationed off Elba to keep in Bonaparte and to keep out the Algerines. He told us several anecdotes of the rude treatment of Bonaparte by thAmong them he said that Captain Towers, or Jack Towers, as he called him, gave a ball, at which many of the inhabitants of Elba were present, and Bonaparte was invited. When he came alongside, and was announced, the dancing stopped, out of complim
The Hague (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 3
wagon, which did not even pretend to have any,—to transport us to Rotterdam. Our road, the whole distance, went over a dyke, and some portions of it were on the coast, where the broad ocean leans against the land. From Rotterdam, they went to the Hague, Leyden, Haarlem, Amsterdam, and Utrecht, where he parted from Mr. and Mrs. Perkins, and Mr. and Miss Haven; and with Mr. Everett and young Perkins, To be placed at school in Gottingen. went on his way to Gottingen. Of this parting, he sayan did, who, after receiving an invitation to dine in Amsterdam, had occasion to pass over the isthmus on a stormy day, when the ocean was rather more violent than it commonly is, and, instead of returning to observe his engagement, hastened to the Hague, and sent back, for an excuse, that he had seen the water breaking over the dike, and was sure that Amsterdam could not exist two days longer; and yet nothing can be more absurd, though I am sure nothing can be more natural, than these feelings
Coppet (Switzerland) (search for this): chapter 3
sses common accomplishments in an uncommon degree, and adds to all this a sweet temper. She was dressed to go and drive, and, after stopping a few moments, went to her carriage. Lord Byron's manner to her was affectionate; he followed her to the door, and shook hands with her, as if he were not to see her for a month. June 21.—I passed an hour this morning very pleasantly indeed with Sir Humphry Davy, from whom I have received great courtesy and kindness. He told me that when he was at Coppet, Mad. de Stael showed him part of a work on England similar in plan to her De l'allemagne, but which will be only about two thirds as long. Murray told me she had offered it to him, and had the conscience to ask four thousand guineas for it. When I came away, Sir Humphry gave me several letters for the Continent, and among them one for Canova, one for De la Rive at Geneva, and one for Mad. de Stael, which I was very glad to receive from him,—for there is nobody in England whom Mad. de Stae
Shrewsbury (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
t of holy reverence, and he read me from among them several characteristic love-letters, and some Jacobite pieces of poetry, which have never been, and never will be published, with a degree of feeling which would have moved me in one of my own age, and was doubly interesting in an old man. Mr. Ticknor left Liverpool on the 17th of May, and arrived in London on the 25th of the same month, travelling in the leisurely style of those days; passing through Chester, St. Asaph's, Llangollen, Shrewsbury, Birmingham, and Warwick; everywhere charmed with the aspect of a rich and cultivated country glowing with the bloom and verdure of an English spring. In addition to a copious correspondence with relatives and friends at home, it was his custom to keep full journals of his life and experiences during his whole residence in Europe, from which we shall often draw. Journal. May 20, 1815.—A few miles after we left the valley [Llangollen], to which we cast back many a longing, lingerin
Birmingham (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
verence, and he read me from among them several characteristic love-letters, and some Jacobite pieces of poetry, which have never been, and never will be published, with a degree of feeling which would have moved me in one of my own age, and was doubly interesting in an old man. Mr. Ticknor left Liverpool on the 17th of May, and arrived in London on the 25th of the same month, travelling in the leisurely style of those days; passing through Chester, St. Asaph's, Llangollen, Shrewsbury, Birmingham, and Warwick; everywhere charmed with the aspect of a rich and cultivated country glowing with the bloom and verdure of an English spring. In addition to a copious correspondence with relatives and friends at home, it was his custom to keep full journals of his life and experiences during his whole residence in Europe, from which we shall often draw. Journal. May 20, 1815.—A few miles after we left the valley [Llangollen], to which we cast back many a longing, lingering look, we c
France (France) (search for this): chapter 3
We cannot measure or comprehend it. . . . . . When Napoleon was rejected from France, every man in Christendom, of honest principles and feelings, felt as if a weigous about my going to the Continent, in consequence of the change of affairs in France. I assure you there is not the least occasion for anxiety. . . . . It is not abarrassment in going now, or after hostilities have commenced, even directly to France, much less to Holland, and to a university which knows no changes of war or peafrom the testimony of very many of our countrymen, who have just returned from France and Germany. But not only Americans, but Englishmen go every day to the Continable variety of subjects,—America, of which she seemed to know considerable; of France, and Greece, with something of her husband's visit there,—and spoke of all with ugliness and deformity of David the painter; told us some of her adventures in France, a year ago; and, in speaking of Bonaparte, repeated some powerful lines from t
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...