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Guildhall (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
? But screw your courage to the sticking place And we'll not fail. June 7.—This morning I breakfasted with Mr. Sharp, and had a continuation of yesterday,—more pleasant accounts of the great men of the present day, and more amusing anecdotes of the generation that has passed away. After breakfast he carried me through the Stock Exchange into the London Exchange, the square area of a large stone pile built in the time of Charles II.; from there to Lloyd's Coffee-House, and finally to Guildhall.Zzz To Mr. And Mrs. Ticknor. London, June 8, 1815. . . . . I cannot tell you how happy your letters have made me. It is all well, and I am sure home must still be to you what it always has been to me, the place of all content and happiness. You, my dear father, are now, I suppose, at Hanover, and I know all that you are enjoying there. . . . . Tell the children how dear they will be to me wherever I may go, and do not suffer them to forget me, for there are few things I should drea
Sydenham (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
hink of nothing, and see nothing, but the Guards. My God! all destroyed! It seems as if I should never sleep again! This was his favorite regiment; and when they were mustered, after the battle, out of above a thousand men, less than three hundred answered. June 25.—Mr. Campbell asked me to come out and see him to-day, and make it a long day's visit. So, after the morning service, I drove out, and stayed with him until nearly nine this evening. He lives in a pleasant little box, at Sydenham, nine miles from town, a beautiful village, which looks more like an American village than any I have seen in England. His wife is a bonny little Scotchwoman, with a great deal of natural vivacity; and his only child, a boy of about ten, an intelligent little fellow, but somewhat injured by indulgence, I fear. . . . . They seem very happy, and have made me so, for there was no one with them but myself, except an old schoolmate of Campbell's, now a barrister of considerable eminence. . . .
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 3
tion and sounding phrases like his writings,—and as dictatorial as an emperor's. He chose those subjects which he thought would be most interesting to me; and, though he often mistook in this, he never failed to be amusing. On American politics, he was bold and decisive. He thought we had ample cause for war, and seemed to have a very favorable opinion of our principal men, such as Jefferson and Madison, and our late measures, such as Monroe's conscription plan, and the subject of taking Canada,—though it was evident enough that he knew little about any of them. Thirty years ago, said he in a solemn tone, which would have been worthy of Johnson,—thirty years ago, sir, I turned on my heel when I heard you called rebels, and I was always glad that you beat us. He made some inquiries on the subject of our learning and universities, of which he was profoundly ignorant, and spoke of the state of religion in our section of the country—in particular of Dr. Freeman's alterations of the
Cumberland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
two of the frigates went down to Algiers, to ascertain by personal inquiry. Captain Fuller and the other captain had an audience of the Dey, but the only answer they could get was this: Your masters were fools, when they had the Frenchman in their hands, that they did not cut off his head. If I catch him, I shall act more wisely. At three o'clock, I went to the literary exchange at Murray's bookstore. Gifford was there, as usual, and Sir James Burgess, who, I find, is the man of whom Cumberland so often speaks, and in conjunction with whom he wrote the Exodiad; and before long Lord Byron came in, and stayed out the whole party. I was glad to meet him there; for there I saw him among his fellows and friends,—men with whom he felt intimate, and who felt themselves equal to him. The conversation turned upon the great victory at Waterloo, for which Lord Byron received the satirical congratulations of his ministerial friends with a good-nature which surprised me. He did not, however,
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 3
that met the passengers as they entered the Mersey. May 11, 1815, evening. The pilot who is carrying us into Liverpool, told us of Bonaparte's return to Paris, and re-establishment at the head of the French Empire. We did not believe it; but from another pilot-boat, which we have just spoken, we have received an accountrte was in Elba, and all Europe in a state of profound peace. The pilot came on board as we approached the mouth of the Mersey, and told us that Bonaparte was in Paris, and that everything was preparing for a general war against him. Having been bred in the strictest school of Federalism, I felt as the great majority of the Engli; he has been in Downing Street this morning, and I have just seen him as he was going to Lady Wellington's. He says he thinks Bonaparte is in full retreat towards Paris. After an instant's pause, Lord Byron replied, I am d—d sorry for it; and then, after another slight pause, he added, I did n't know but I might live to see Lord
Trajectum (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 3
friends with whom he had crossed the ocean, and, crossing by Harwich, landed at Helvoetsluys. There, he says, We took the only two machines in the village,—a coach, which seemed to be without springs, and a wagon, which did not even pretend to have any,—to transport us to Rotterdam. Our road, the whole distance, went over a dyke, and some portions of it were on the coast, where the broad ocean leans against the land. From Rotterdam, they went to the Hague, Leyden, Haarlem, Amsterdam, and Utrecht, where he parted from Mr. and Mrs. Perkins, and Mr. and Miss Haven; and with Mr. Everett and young Perkins, To be placed at school in Gottingen. went on his way to Gottingen. Of this parting, he says: It was not, indeed, like the bitterness of leaving home, but it was all else, and, indeed, in the sense of desolation, the same. For more than three months we had lived together as one family, . . . . and the affections which had long existed were ripened into the nearest intimacy. On
St. Petersburg (Russia) (search for this): chapter 3
ception that it was the only means by which he could fit himself for future usefulness in the path he had chosen. He sailed in the Liverpool packet, on the 16th of April, 1815. He had the happiness of the companionship of four of his most valued and intimate friends,—Mr. and Mrs. Samuel G. Perkins, Mr. Edward Everett, and Mr. Haven, of Portsmouth, N. H. Among other passengers were two young sons of Mr. John Quincy Adams, on their way to join their father, then United States Minister at St. Petersburg. Mr. Ticknor wrote many pages during his voyage to his father and mother, full of affection and cheering thoughts, and giving incidents and details, to amuse their solitary hours. The last page gives his first natural feeling at the startling news that met the passengers as they entered the Mersey. May 11, 1815, evening. The pilot who is carrying us into Liverpool, told us of Bonaparte's return to Paris, and re-establishment at the head of the French Empire. We did not bel
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
showed Mrs. Siddons's masculine powers in the stronger light of comparison and contrast. Her daughter, who was with her, is the handsomest lady I have seen in England. She is about twenty. After she was gone, the conversation naturally turned on the stage. Lord Byron asked me what actors I had heard, and, when I told him, imitated to me the manner of Munden, Braham, Cooke, and Kemble, with exactness, as far as I had heard them. Kemble has been ill ever since I arrived, and is now in Scotland, and of course I could not judge of the imitation of him. Afterwards I had a long and singular conversation with Lord Byron, in which, with that simplicity which I have uniformly found to mark his character, he told me a great deal of the history of his early feelings and habits; of the impressions of extreme discontent under which he wrote Childe Harold, which he began at Joannina and finished at Smyrna; and of the extravagant intention he had formed of settling in Greece, which, but f
Liverpool (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
815, evening. The pilot who is carrying us into Liverpool, told us of Bonaparte's return to Paris, and re-es arrival in England. In May, 1815, I arrived in Liverpool. When I left Boston, Bonaparte was in Elba, and acrisis of their national affairs; but, on reaching Liverpool, I soon found that not a few people looked upon thd he had seen the repudiated article. While in Liverpool, Mr. Ticknor made the acquaintance of Mr. Roscoe, Of the acquaintances whom I found or formed in Liverpool, I know not that you will be much interested to hend his fine house (Allerton Hall, eight miles from Liverpool) is open to all strangers,—whose company he even sly interesting in an old man. Mr. Ticknor left Liverpool on the 17th of May, and arrived in London on the 2Mr. Roscoe had volunteered me a letter, but I left Liverpool half a day before I intended, and the consequence rfectly easy, for I shall run no risk .... We left Liverpool on the 17th, and arrived here on the 25th, and are
Portsmouth (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
e in the same vessel. The separation from home cost him a severe struggle, and nothing could have enabled him to keep his resolution but the clear perception that it was the only means by which he could fit himself for future usefulness in the path he had chosen. He sailed in the Liverpool packet, on the 16th of April, 1815. He had the happiness of the companionship of four of his most valued and intimate friends,—Mr. and Mrs. Samuel G. Perkins, Mr. Edward Everett, and Mr. Haven, of Portsmouth, N. H. Among other passengers were two young sons of Mr. John Quincy Adams, on their way to join their father, then United States Minister at St. Petersburg. Mr. Ticknor wrote many pages during his voyage to his father and mother, full of affection and cheering thoughts, and giving incidents and details, to amuse their solitary hours. The last page gives his first natural feeling at the startling news that met the passengers as they entered the Mersey. May 11, 1815, evening. The
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