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Halle (Saxony-Anhalt, Germany) (search for this): chapter 5
were only from Cassel to Marburg, or from Berlin to Halle. My second proof is, that they not only feel themtes are in German. This gave him a professorship at Halle, to whose spirit his talents and temper were adaptedter this, Wolf seems to have been tolerably quiet at Halle, till the change was made by the French, when he weelf by his political conduct when the French were in Halle; and he has sunk from all respect by his vices in ol and Berlin, and the rest of the time to Wittenberg, Halle, Weimar, Jena, Gotha, etc. They returned to Gottingeneral satiety of all extravagance and debauchery. Halle, October 19, 1816.—This evening we passed with a considerable party at the house of Halle's Magnus Apollo, Chancellor Niemeyer. He is now, I imagine, about sixty-. His whole career has, I believe, been confined to Halle, where he has long been the first man, head of all t established, obtained, through him, indulgences for Halle. Jerome had confidence in him, and he deserved it,
St. Petersburg (Russia) (search for this): chapter 5
n; soon after Denmark, and then a part of Poland; and now, lately, the king of Bavaria, by the establishment of gymnasia, and an academy on the German system, and by calling in the Protestants of the North to help him, has set his improvements in motion, and the Emperor Alexander, by founding German universities and appointing German professors to them, have almost brought Bavaria and Russia into the league of letters. In this way, without noise and almost without notice, from Berne to St. Petersburg, and from Munich to Copenhagen, a republic has been formed, extending through all the great and small governments, and independent of the influence of them all, which by its activity unites all the interests of learning, while by its extent it prevents low prejudice from so often oppressing individual merit; and finally, by its aggregate power resting, as it must, on general opinion, it is able to exert a force which nothing that naturally comes under its influence can resist. I could
Calvary (Israel) (search for this): chapter 5
over the other professors and with the government, and his general knowledge of the world and of men. . . . . His collections in all the different branches of natural history are very remarkable; the most curious is that of one hundred and seventy-three skulls, of all ages, countries, and people, which he has brought together to illustrate his doctrines respecting the human anatomy, and which are arranged with philosophical neatness in a room to which his family have well given the name of Golgotha. It is extremely amusing, as well as instructive, to hear the old gentleman pour out his learning and enthusiasm in explaining the advantages of the collection, and the distinctive peculiarities of each of its members. What can be more beautiful, said he, day before yesterday, than the fair forehead and Grecian nose of that Circassian,—what can be more deformed than the wide interval between the eyes of that Calmuck and the projecting chin of that Hottentot,—or what more loathsome than th
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
s; though, in turning over the leaves of his English copy, he showed us, by accident, Chersonesus used as a feminine, and quem as a relative consequent to cenotaphium, which, though I conceive them to be no disgrace to Porson, and little to his publishers, are still an entire justification of all Schaffer had said in his preface . . . . Farewell. It is late, and I am tired, as I always am in a strange place, if it be only from seeing unwonted objects and faces. Still your Yankee friend, Geo. Journal. September 22.—In the afternoon we went through the gallery of pictures which has made Dresden so famous through the world; and, though I had read the admiration of Lessing, Herder, and Winckelmann, it surpassed my expectations. From looking at a collection of above thirteen hundred pieces an hour or two, I cannot of course say anything; but of the effect of one piece on my unpractised eye I cannot choose but speak, for I would not willingly lose the recollection of what I now
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 5
and as he takes a particular delight in teasing me, he commonly relates something out of the way respecting our North American Indians, which by a dexterous turn he contrives to make those present think is equally true of the citizens of the United States, and ends by citing some of the strange opinions of Buffon or Raynal to support himself, and put me out of countenance. Of course we come at once into a regular discussion, in which he goes on to allege more perverse authorities against me, son to be a man of great talents and acuteness, but did not think much of Madison, spoke well of many democrats whom he thought honest, able men, etc., etc., and in general seemed to understand the situation of the politics and parties of the United States pretty well, though his mission lasted only five months, and he was hardly out of Washington . . . . . Among other things, we talked of Lord Byron; and he mentioned to me a circumstance which proves what I have always believed,—that Lord Byro
Westphalia (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 5
tters—he is a finelook-ing, gentlemanly man. His whole career has, I believe, been confined to Halle, where he has long been the first man, head of all their establishments, ruler of the University, etc., etc. In 1806, he was thought by the French a man of so much consequence, that he was one of the six whom they carried off to France as hostages for this quarter of the country, and he remained there half a year. During this exile he became acquainted with Jerome, and when the kingdom of Westphalia was established, obtained, through him, indulgences for Halle. Jerome had confidence in him, and he deserved it, not by becoming a Frenchman, but by remaining faithful to the University, and desiring nothing but its good. He was, therefore, in 1808, made chancellor and rector perpetuus, and soon after knight of the same order that Heyne received. The last honor, of course, vanished with the Westphalian dominion; the chancellorship he retains, but the rectorship he found a burden too gre
Bavaria (Bavaria, Germany) (search for this): chapter 5
thinking and liberal universities were extended, the limits of this invisible empire extended with them. The German and reformed portion of Switzerland soon came in; soon after Denmark, and then a part of Poland; and now, lately, the king of Bavaria, by the establishment of gymnasia, and an academy on the German system, and by calling in the Protestants of the North to help him, has set his improvements in motion, and the Emperor Alexander, by founding German universities and appointing German professors to them, have almost brought Bavaria and Russia into the league of letters. In this way, without noise and almost without notice, from Berne to St. Petersburg, and from Munich to Copenhagen, a republic has been formed, extending through all the great and small governments, and independent of the influence of them all, which by its activity unites all the interests of learning, while by its extent it prevents low prejudice from so often oppressing individual merit; and finally,
independent district in which he was born, as Prussia, or Hesse, etc.; and you will find, too, thattalk with as much horror of expatriation from Prussia, Hanover, or Hesse as Bonaparte ever did of dved from one country to another. The king of Prussia would not appoint to any military or civil se Saxon; Buhle, the editor of Aristotle, is in Prussia, etc.; and new instances of this sort are occe struck and moved me than the means by which Prussia has made herself the first power in the Germarol its destinies. By the peace of Tilsit, Prussia gave up to France about one half of her populf seemed to have fled from the Continent, and Prussia herself to have been marked out as the peculiany lay in abject subjection, the ministry of Prussia conceived and announced the determination of physical. From that moment the character of Prussia began to change. The means were no sooner wairst conceived them. It was in this way that Prussia was gradually and systematically prepared for[1 more...]
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 5
and topography. But, after all that has been said, and after all his description, the thing itself remained as unreal as Sidney's Arcadia, or Sir Thomas More's Utopia. The system of universal patronage in England, which it did not need Miss Edgeworth to show, is essentially bad, even when most successfully applied; the splendor of the Court of France, which made all its literature and literary men as cold and polished as itself; the little tyrants of Italy and the great ones of Spain and Portugal,—prevented everything like a liberal union of the men of letters, and an unbiassed freedom in the modes of thinking in all these countries. In Germany, however, from the force of circumstances and character, a literary democracy has found full room to thrive and rule. Here, there can be no broad system of patronage, for the people are too poor and the governments too inconsiderable. The splendor of a court can have no influence where there is no metropolis; and as for tyranny, I do not
Weimar (Thuringia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 5
close of 1816. German literature. German metaphysics. anecdotes of Blumenbach and Wolf. Leipsic. Dresden. Berlin. Weimar. visit to Goethe. receives the offer of the Professorship of French and Spanish literature at Harvard. To C. S.ced from his native country, though it certainly would be the highest in the other cases. Thus Eichhorn was brought from Weimar; Boeckh, now so famous in Berlin, was a Hanoverian; Heyne was a Saxon; Buhle, the editor of Aristotle, is in Prussia, etcn, having given a fortnight to Dresden, a week each to Leipsic and Berlin, and the rest of the time to Wittenberg, Halle, Weimar, Jena, Gotha, etc. They returned to Gottingen, November 5. To Edward T. Channing. Leipsic, September, 17, 1816. . uch amusing conversation, and at eleven o'clock everybody went home, and we bade farewell to the Chancellor and Halle. Weimar, October 25.—We sent our letters to Goethe this morning, and he returned for answer the message that he would be happy to
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