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January 1st (search for this): chapter 8
s I may make hereafter. He therefore records the facts and conclusions that he gathered, in the order he proposed, in a very clear and interesting manner; but in the many succeeding years Rome has been so studied and developed by the best minds and the finest art, that we refrain from giving even what was very curious at the time it was written, and the proof of most faithful and scholarly research. To Elisha Ticknor Rome, January 1, 1818. Once more, dearest father and mother, my New Year's festival is passed away from you. It makes it sad, but I do not complain. It is a great deal that God has so kindly favored and promoted all the objects for which I came to Europe, has spared my life and increased my health, and, by bringing me nearer to the period when I shall finish the pursuits that separated me from you, [has] made it more probable that we shall meet again in the happiness we once so gladly enjoyed together. . . . . With Rome, I find every day more reason to be con
February 28th (search for this): chapter 8
s health. I always had a plate at their table, and generally met somebody that interested or instructed me: such as Sir William Cumming, a Scotchman of talent; the famous Azzelini, who was with Bonaparte in Egypt, and gave me once a curious account of the shooting the prisoners and poisoning the sick at Jaffa; Miss Lydia White, the fashionable blue-stocking; and many others of the same sort, so that the two or three days in the week I dined there were very pleasantly passed. On the 28th of February Mr. Ticknor left Naples and returned to Rome. To Elisha Ticknor. Rome, March 3, 1818. . . . . My visit at Naples, on which I was absent from this city just a month, was every way pleasant and interesting. The weather in particular — which is of great importance in a place like Naples, where almost everything you desire to see is outside of the city—was, with the exception of one or two days, only delightful. It was what the Italians call their first spring, and the almond-trees
give up yet. I have actually engaged a man to come to me six hours a week. . . . . But, as to engage a man to talk with me would be the surest way to stop all conversation, I have taken a professor of architecture, on condition he should explain to me the principles, theory, and history of his art in Italian. This will do something for me. . . . . I should be sorry to go out of Italy without being able to speak the language well. . . . . I shall probably go from Leghorn to Barcelona about May first, and from Portugal to England, uncertain whether by water or by Paris, about the middle of October. More of this hereafter. Geo. To Elisha Ticknor. January 15, 1818. . . . . Rome continues to be all to me that my imagination ever represented it, and all that it was when I first arrived here. This is saying a great deal after a residence of above two months; but in truth I find the resources of this wonderful city continually increasing upon me the longer I remain in it, and I am s
a man to talk with me would be the surest way to stop all conversation, I have taken a professor of architecture, on condition he should explain to me the principles, theory, and history of his art in Italian. This will do something for me. . . . . I should be sorry to go out of Italy without being able to speak the language well. . . . . I shall probably go from Leghorn to Barcelona about May first, and from Portugal to England, uncertain whether by water or by Paris, about the middle of October. More of this hereafter. Geo. To Elisha Ticknor. January 15, 1818. . . . . Rome continues to be all to me that my imagination ever represented it, and all that it was when I first arrived here. This is saying a great deal after a residence of above two months; but in truth I find the resources of this wonderful city continually increasing upon me the longer I remain in it, and I am sure I shall leave it with more regret than I have yet left any spot in Europe. I went out of Paris
the most cultivated and interesting. Of the Russians there are a good many that circulate in general society, and talk French and English fluently; but, really, wherever I have seen this people, I have found them so abdicating their nationality and taking the hue of the society they are among, that I have lost much of my respect for them. Two, however, whom I have known here are men to be respected anywhere. . . . . One of them is Admiral Tchitchagof, who made so much noise in the war of 1812, and who is simple and respectable, though I should not have imagined that he was distinguished for his talents. The other is Italinski, the Russian Ambassador, whom I know more, because I am in the habit of going frequently to see him. He is the author of the Explanations to the three volumes of Tischbein's Etruscan Vases, and a man of Eastern learning, particularly in the modern languages of Asia. . . . . He is now infirm, though not very old; gentle and kind in his manners; living rather
d enjoying Rome like a cultivated gentleman with much taste and considerable talent. . . . . He talks English pretty well, and knows a good deal about general history, and something about America, which he liked well to let me see. . . . . Mr. Ticknor in later years gave the following account of an interesting scene he witnessed in Rome at this time. It was written down immediately by one of those who heard it. The first time I ever saw Bunsen he was introduced to me at Gottingen, in 1816, by one of the professors, and I was told that he had been two years private tutor to one of my countrymen, Mr. William B. Astor. He was then on his way to Rome to be private secretary to Niebuhr. A year and a half afterwards, when I went to Rome, I found him there, a married man. I witnessed a very extraordinary scene there,—the celebration of the three-hundredth anniversary of Luther's burning the Papal bull, got up right under the nose of the Pope! It was very curious. It was in Oct
November 2nd, 1817 AD (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 8: Residence in Rome. presentation to the Pope. visit to Naples. society in Naples. Archbishop of Tarentum. Sir William Gell. society in Rome. Bunsen. Niebuhr. French, Russians, and Portuguese in Rome. Duchess of Devonshire. Bonaparte family. Florence. Countess of Albany. Mr. Ticknor arrived in Rome on the 2d of November, 1817, and left it for the North the 22d of March, 1818. Of these five months, one was passed in Naples and four in Rome, the latter devoted to the study of Italian and the ancient and modern treasures of that wonderful city. To do this systematically and profitably he engaged Professor Nibby, a well-known archaeologist, to visit with him the different portions of ancient Rome and their ruins, and he gives nearly one volume of his Journal to the results of these walks and studies, availing himself of materials he collected in Germany the year before and the many books he carried with him. The following passage shows the thorou
January 1st, 1818 AD (search for this): chapter 8
ich I can attach the miscellaneous researches and inquiries I may make hereafter. He therefore records the facts and conclusions that he gathered, in the order he proposed, in a very clear and interesting manner; but in the many succeeding years Rome has been so studied and developed by the best minds and the finest art, that we refrain from giving even what was very curious at the time it was written, and the proof of most faithful and scholarly research. To Elisha Ticknor Rome, January 1, 1818. Once more, dearest father and mother, my New Year's festival is passed away from you. It makes it sad, but I do not complain. It is a great deal that God has so kindly favored and promoted all the objects for which I came to Europe, has spared my life and increased my health, and, by bringing me nearer to the period when I shall finish the pursuits that separated me from you, [has] made it more probable that we shall meet again in the happiness we once so gladly enjoyed together. .
January 15th, 1818 AD (search for this): chapter 8
ation, I have taken a professor of architecture, on condition he should explain to me the principles, theory, and history of his art in Italian. This will do something for me. . . . . I should be sorry to go out of Italy without being able to speak the language well. . . . . I shall probably go from Leghorn to Barcelona about May first, and from Portugal to England, uncertain whether by water or by Paris, about the middle of October. More of this hereafter. Geo. To Elisha Ticknor. January 15, 1818. . . . . Rome continues to be all to me that my imagination ever represented it, and all that it was when I first arrived here. This is saying a great deal after a residence of above two months; but in truth I find the resources of this wonderful city continually increasing upon me the longer I remain in it, and I am sure I shall leave it with more regret than I have yet left any spot in Europe. I went out of Paris without once recollecting that it was for the last time; but it wil
February 1st, 1818 AD (search for this): chapter 8
imagination ever represented it, and all that it was when I first arrived here. This is saying a great deal after a residence of above two months; but in truth I find the resources of this wonderful city continually increasing upon me the longer I remain in it, and I am sure I shall leave it with more regret than I have yet left any spot in Europe. I went out of Paris without once recollecting that it was for the last time; but it will not be so with Rome. To Elisha Ticknor. Rome, February 1, 1818. . . . . Cogswell and myself have been presented to the Pope this morning. He is the only sovereign in Europe I have ever felt any curiosity to see, and I desired to see him very much, on account of the firmness and dignity with which he always behaved in the most difficult and distressing circumstances, when kings and governments, of force incomparably greater, shrunk and yielded. We were presented by Abbe Taylor, an Irish Catholic, who is appointed by the Pope to present the En
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