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, one night, In 1857. See ante, p. 352. after he had shown us that he knew more about the politics and parties of this country than any Italian we had seen all the preceding winter. Mademoiselle, he answered, je crois que vous parlerez beaucoup de laemancipation, et que vous émanciperez fort peu. Shall we come to this condition, this point? I trust not in my time; but we are nearer to it than— six months ago—I thought it was possible we should be in ten years. . . . . By the end of January you will be able to judge of all these things as well as we can. By that time the programme will be out. Some people—and among them two or three whose opinions are worth having—believe that leading men at the South have already an understanding with Louis Napoleon, that, for certain advantages in trade, he should enter into an alliance, offensive and defensive, with them. I do not believe in this. But it may come with time. . . . Anna wrote to Lady Lyell so much about the Prince's
with you; such, so far as England is concerned, as I never saw before, and never hoped to live to see. If your people are in the same temper about us, I think no trouble of a serious nature will arise in this generation. . . . . I have written such a long letter, about matters with which I have very small concern, that I have hardly room to send the love of all of us to dear Lady Head, and C. and A. I shall look to hear from you very soon, and to have you all again under my roof-tree in February. Faithfully yours, G. Ticknor. From Sir E. Head. ATHENAeUM, [London, ] November 23, 1860. My dear Ticknor,—I owe you another letter, were it only to thank you for your kindness in writing again so soon. I am able to say that everybody in this country sets the highest value on the courtesy and friendly bearing towards the Prince, shown in the United States. I may begin from the top, for I had the opportunity of talking both to the Queen and Prince Albert on the subject last wee
November 23rd, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 21
e to see. If your people are in the same temper about us, I think no trouble of a serious nature will arise in this generation. . . . . I have written such a long letter, about matters with which I have very small concern, that I have hardly room to send the love of all of us to dear Lady Head, and C. and A. I shall look to hear from you very soon, and to have you all again under my roof-tree in February. Faithfully yours, G. Ticknor. From Sir E. Head. ATHENAeUM, [London, ] November 23, 1860. My dear Ticknor,—I owe you another letter, were it only to thank you for your kindness in writing again so soon. I am able to say that everybody in this country sets the highest value on the courtesy and friendly bearing towards the Prince, shown in the United States. I may begin from the top, for I had the opportunity of talking both to the Queen and Prince Albert on the subject last week. Your Minister (Dallas) and his wife were at the Castle at the same time with myself. The
December 11th (search for this): chapter 21
n were necessary with reference to the Prince's visit. I attributed a large portion of its success to the Prince of Wales's own courtesy and good-nature, which is strictly true. Palmerston and Lord John Russell were at the Castle,—the former vigorous enough to walk upwards of three miles with me and Lord St. Germans in the afternoon of Sunday. Lady Head is tolerably well, but she has had a bad cold. We are at Farrance's, near Eaton Square, which is a most comfortable hotel. On Saturday, December 11, we shall be at Oxford, on our way to the West. Milman is very well; so are the Lyells. I examined Lyell's collection of the flint axe-heads from St. Acheul, in Picardy, contemporaneous with the elephants, etc. Of their human origin there can be no doubt. The evidence of design in their fabrication is as clear as it would be in Paley's watch. Lyell speaks confidently of their geological date. Twisleton and his wife dined at Kent House last night. She is looking peaky from a c
April 8th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 21
hey embarked, and most pleasant letters since their arrival. Yours faithfully, Geo. Ticknor. In a letter to Sir Edmund Head Mr. Ticknor says:— With Dr. Acland I had a charming day, driving about in Cambridge, Charlestown, and Boston, seven or eight hours,—one of which, or nearly one, was spent with him and Agassiz, alone in Agassiz's Museum, and of which I must give you an account when I see you. It was one of the remarkable hours of my life. To Sir Edmund Head, Bart. Boston, April 8, 1861. My dear Head,—We are all asleep here, and have been for some time, personally and politically. . . . All North--the old Union —is asleep, but is not therefore doing well. In my judgment we are drifting. Perhaps some anchor will hold. But, if it does, the cable may snap. Of course, with these views, I do not feel better about our affairs than I did when you were here; Six months before. nor take a more cheerful view of them than you do in your letters. To Sir Edmund Head.
gagements, we have been little at home. We made a visit directly to our kinsfolk in Berkshire, Hon. B. R. Curtis and his family. which had been promised three successive years; then we went to New York to buy carpets, missing Cogswell, or, as he pretends, avoiding him by a day; then we went to some friends on the North River; and now we are just come back from Savage's, Mr. James Savage's country-place at Lunenburg, in the northern part of Massachusetts. where we have been due since 1855. Of course the few intervening days at home have been busy enough. The practical result, however, of the whole is, that we have had an uncommonly pleasant summer,—generally a gay one for old folks,—and that we are now in excellent health, gathered comfortably to our own hearthstone, with good pluck to encounter a New England winter, which the two Annas like less than I do. Touching the Prince's visit,—of which you speak inquiringly,—I think you know just about as much as I do . . . . Ev
and more feeble by the constantly increasing power of the free States. . . . . Meanwhile, the very suggestion has thrown the finances of the country into confusion. There was a panic last week, worse in many respects than the formidable one of 1857 . . . . It was foreseen by nobody, and is a proof not only of the importance of the political questions at issue, but of the peculiar sensitiveness of men in a government which is so purely a matter of opinion, and which has so few traditions and lics, and at the end, when, if it ever happens, we must have three, or four, or five millions of uneducated slaves on our hands, what shall we do with them? Anna—the younger—asked this question of Count Cavour, in his opera-box, one night, In 1857. See ante, p. 352. after he had shown us that he knew more about the politics and parties of this country than any Italian we had seen all the preceding winter. Mademoiselle, he answered, je crois que vous parlerez beaucoup de laemancipation, e
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