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ody in this country sets the highest value on the courtesy and friendly bearing towards the Prince, shown in the United States. I may begin from the top, for I had the opportunity of talking both to the Queen and Prince Albert on the subject last week. Your Minister (Dallas) and his wife were at the Castle at the same time with myself. The Prince appeared in good spirits, and perfectly recovered from his long voyage. Neither her Majesty nor the Prince spoke to me of your letters, but General Phipps wrote to Lewis, saying how much they were interested by the first. Lewis read to them such portions of the second as were adapted to royal ears . . Prince Albert expressed himself to me personally in terms much stronger than were necessary with reference to the Prince's visit. I attributed a large portion of its success to the Prince of Wales's own courtesy and good-nature, which is strictly true. Palmerston and Lord John Russell were at the Castle,—the former vigorous enough to wa
Charles Lyell (search for this): chapter 21
Chapter 21: Letters, 1859-61, to Sir C. Lyell, Hon. E. Everett, Sir E. Head, C. S. Daveis. To Sir Charles Lyell. Boston, May 17, 1859. My dear Lyell,—By the time this letter reaches London, I trusLyell,—By the time this letter reaches London, I trust that you will be safely back in Harley Street, from the land of dikes and canals,—a strange country, which I here. We are all well, and all send love to dear Lady Lyell. . . . . Yours always, Geo. Ticknor. In 1 Milman is very well; so are the Lyells. I examined Lyell's collection of the flint axe-heads from St. Acheul,cation is as clear as it would be in Paley's watch. Lyell speaks confidently of their geological date. Twisand Anna. Yours truly, Edmund Head. To Sir Charles Lyell, Bart. Boston, November 27, 1860. My dear Lyell,—You will be glad, I think, to hear something about the state of affairs in the United States, from somebBut it may come with time. . . . Anna wrote to Lady Lyell so much about the Prince's visit, that I can add
George Lewis (search for this): chapter 21
ittle doubt whether his judgment is equal to his genius and virtue. How striking it is, that two such scholars as he and Lewis should have made such capital Chancellors of the Exchequer! I think either of them could, while in office, have stood successfully for a scholarship at Oxford. But what is Lewis doing with Babrius, and what set him out to do anything with him? I only know the booksellers announcement. To Sir Edmund Head. Gardiner, Maine, July 26, 1860. My dear Head,—Your letovered from his long voyage. Neither her Majesty nor the Prince spoke to me of your letters, but General Phipps wrote to Lewis, saying how much they were interested by the first. Lewis read to them such portions of the second as were adapted to roLewis read to them such portions of the second as were adapted to royal ears . . Prince Albert expressed himself to me personally in terms much stronger than were necessary with reference to the Prince's visit. I attributed a large portion of its success to the Prince of Wales's own courtesy and good-nature, whi
Lady Head is tolerably well, but she has had a bad cold. We are at Farrance's, near Eaton Square, which is a most comfortable hotel. On Saturday, December 11, we shall be at Oxford, on our way to the West. Milman is very well; so are the Lyells. I examined Lyell's collection of the flint axe-heads from St. Acheul, in Picardy, contemporaneous with the elephants, etc. Of their human origin there can be no doubt. The evidence of design in their fabrication is as clear as it would be in Paley's watch. Lyell speaks confidently of their geological date. Twisleton and his wife dined at Kent House last night. She is looking peaky from a cold, but otherwise well. Hogarth will resuscitate your print, and I have told him to frame it plainly. There is, I think, a considerable theological movement, since I was last in England, in a rationalistic direction. Kind regards to Mrs. Ticknor and Anna. Yours truly, Edmund Head. To Sir Charles Lyell, Bart. Boston, November 2
e told him to frame it plainly. There is, I think, a considerable theological movement, since I was last in England, in a rationalistic direction. Kind regards to Mrs. Ticknor and Anna. Yours truly, Edmund Head. To Sir Charles Lyell, Bart. Boston, November 27, 1860. My dear Lyell,—You will be glad, I think, to hear something about the state of affairs in the United States, from somebody with whom you are so well acquainted that you will know how to measure what he says. . . . .and Boston, seven or eight hours,—one of which, or nearly one, was spent with him and Agassiz, alone in Agassiz's Museum, and of which I must give you an account when I see you. It was one of the remarkable hours of my life. To Sir Edmund Head, Bart. Boston, April 8, 1861. My dear Head,—We are all asleep here, and have been for some time, personally and politically. . . . All North--the old Union —is asleep, but is not therefore doing well. In my judgment we are drifting. Perhaps some
George Ticknor (search for this): chapter 21
dear Lady Lyell. . . . . Yours always, Geo. Ticknor. In 1867 Mr. Ticknor, as one of the TrMr. Ticknor, as one of the Trustees of the Zoological Museum, made some extemporaneous remarks before a committee of the Legislandest regards. . . . . Yours sincerely, Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, March 26I will not disguise from you, however, that Mrs. Ticknor and Anna, without whom, and their influenceround by Boston, and reached me here, where Mrs. Ticknor and I are making a visit to our old friends for humanity. Yours always faithfully, Geo. Ticknor. To Mr. Charles S. Daveis. Boston, Octroof-tree in February. Faithfully yours, G. Ticknor. From Sir E. Head. ATHENAeUM, [London, since their arrival. Yours faithfully, Geo. Ticknor. In a letter to Sir Edmund Head Mr. TicknoHead Mr. Ticknor says:— With Dr. Acland I had a charming day, driving about in Cambridge, Charlestown, and Bost We mean, on all accounts, to fight it out, once for all. . . . . Yours truly, Geo. Ticknor. [1 more...]
Washington Irving (search for this): chapter 21
t if we are ignorant, as I think we are, about Canada, they are quite as ignorant about us. I think they hardly know more than the people in England do. . . . . We are all well, and send kindest regards. . . . . Yours sincerely, Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, March 26, 1860. I have been invited by the Historical Society of New York, with Everett and one or two more hereabouts, to listen in their Music Hall to a discourse which Bryant, the poet, will deliver on Washington Irving's birthday, April 3, in honor of his genius and virtues. As I really loved and admired him very much,—having lived a good deal with him in London in 1818-19, just before the Sketch Book came out, when he was in straitened circumstances and little known, —I mean to go. I will not disguise from you, however, that Mrs. Ticknor and Anna, without whom, and their influence, I should not move, want a spree, and that Everett has entered into a bond to do all the talking. In this way I count
Lady Head advises us that she shall be glad to have us come. It is a good while since I have been in that country, and I shall enjoy it very much; and besides that, I think I shall find it salutary. Since the last winter and spring, when I was a little overworked and run down, I find a tonic atmosphere very useful. . . . . Certainly We shall be at home all the month of October, . . . . and count very much upon your visit. Pray make it as long as you can. . I shall be glad to have Garibaldi succeed; but I do not see how all the Italian questions, which seem to be getting more and more complicated every day, are to be peaceably solved. Venice cannot remain as it is, and yet the rest of Italy be made quiet; the Pope will not give up; the Emperor cannot depose him, or permit revolution to go further in Italy than it has gone. In short, it is much like the old case of undertaking to blow the barrel of gunpowder half-way down. I do not see how it is to end. I am in great hopes,
Edward Twisleton (search for this): chapter 21
Farrance's, near Eaton Square, which is a most comfortable hotel. On Saturday, December 11, we shall be at Oxford, on our way to the West. Milman is very well; so are the Lyells. I examined Lyell's collection of the flint axe-heads from St. Acheul, in Picardy, contemporaneous with the elephants, etc. Of their human origin there can be no doubt. The evidence of design in their fabrication is as clear as it would be in Paley's watch. Lyell speaks confidently of their geological date. Twisleton and his wife dined at Kent House last night. She is looking peaky from a cold, but otherwise well. Hogarth will resuscitate your print, and I have told him to frame it plainly. There is, I think, a considerable theological movement, since I was last in England, in a rationalistic direction. Kind regards to Mrs. Ticknor and Anna. Yours truly, Edmund Head. To Sir Charles Lyell, Bart. Boston, November 27, 1860. My dear Lyell,—You will be glad, I think, to hear something
nging to the hotel on the English side, and facing both the falls. It is, on the whole, I think, the grandest scene known to me, though I dare say there are. grander that I have never visited. . . . . When we first came here, Sir Edmund and Lady Head—who are only four or five hours off by rail—came and made us a visit of a few days, since which we have passed a fortnight with them at Toronto and are not without hopes that they will come to us again before we return home. She is a very char Prince of Wales's own courtesy and good-nature, which is strictly true. Palmerston and Lord John Russell were at the Castle,—the former vigorous enough to walk upwards of three miles with me and Lord St. Germans in the afternoon of Sunday. Lady Head is tolerably well, but she has had a bad cold. We are at Farrance's, near Eaton Square, which is a most comfortable hotel. On Saturday, December 11, we shall be at Oxford, on our way to the West. Milman is very well; so are the Lyells. I ex<
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