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Edward Everett (search for this): chapter 21
Chapter 21: Letters, 1859-61, to Sir C. Lyell, Hon. E. Everett, Sir E. Head, C. S. Daveis. To Sir Charles Lyell. Boston, May 17, 1859. My dear Lyell,—By the time this letter reaches London, I trust that you will be safely back in Harley Street, from the land of dikes and canals,—a strange country, which I visited once, and seemed to lead such a sort of amphibious existence, that I have never cared to go there again. But it was in the month of July, and the waters pumped up by the windmills did not give out Sabean odors. We feel very uncomfortable about the news we get from your side of the Atlantic . . . . But I had rather talk about the progress of civilization than its decay and death, which are, I conceive, the natural results of the prevalence of military governments. So I will tell you about Agassiz and his affairs. . . . . The establishment The Museum of Comparative Zoology at Cambridge. is a grand one, and I take an interest in it, not from any
Saturday Review (search for this): chapter 21
es against England, from the time of the French Revolution. It is most desirable, and important, that this tone in our newspapers should be kept up, and that it should be met in a similar spirit by yours. On this point, both sides have heretofore behaved badly enough, and done more, I suspect, than all other causes, to keep up an ill — will between the two countries. Formerly, we were most in fault. Latterly,—allow me to say it,—you have been most in fault, especially the Times, the Saturday Review, and. the Quarterly; whose occasional blunders about the most obvious things only vex us the more, that men, so ignorant of what they discuss, should undertake to pass judgment upon our character and doings. Now is the time to change all this. We are in the best possible temper for it, and are likely to continue so, if nothing comes from your side to cross and disturb us. . . . . Our people are now in excellent humor with themselves, and with you; such, so far as England is concerne<
Louis Agassiz (search for this): chapter 21
d death, which are, I conceive, the natural results of the prevalence of military governments. So I will tell you about Agassiz and his affairs. . . . . The establishment The Museum of Comparative Zoology at Cambridge. is a grand one, and I takethat had intervened, his expectations had been realized in some degree. I know almost nothing of the science he [Professor Agassiz] has illustrated, by labors and sacrifices, which I cannot find elsewhere among us. But this we all know. The diffg about in Cambridge, Charlestown, and Boston, seven or eight hours,—one of which, or nearly one, was spent with him and Agassiz, alone in Agassiz's Museum, and of which I must give you an account when I see you. It was one of the remarkable hours oAgassiz's Museum, and of which I must give you an account when I see you. It was one of the remarkable hours of my life. To Sir Edmund Head, Bart. Boston, April 8, 1861. My dear Head,—We are all asleep here, and have been for some time, personally and politically. . . . All North--the old Union —is asleep, but is not therefore doing well. In my judg<
John Russell (search for this): chapter 21
jesty nor the Prince spoke to me of your letters, but General Phipps wrote to Lewis, saying how much they were interested by the first. Lewis read to them such portions of the second as were adapted to royal ears . . Prince Albert expressed himself to me personally in terms much stronger than were necessary with reference to the Prince's visit. I attributed a large portion of its success to the Prince of Wales's own courtesy and good-nature, which is strictly true. Palmerston and Lord John Russell were at the Castle,—the former vigorous enough to walk upwards of three miles with me and Lord St. Germans in the afternoon of Sunday. Lady Head is tolerably well, but she has had a bad cold. We are at Farrance's, near Eaton Square, which is a most comfortable hotel. On Saturday, December 11, we shall be at Oxford, on our way to the West. Milman is very well; so are the Lyells. I examined Lyell's collection of the flint axe-heads from St. Acheul, in Picardy, contemporaneous with
Henry Clay (search for this): chapter 21
harles Lyell, Bart. Boston, November 27, 1860. My dear Lyell,—You will be glad, I think, to hear something about the state of affairs in the United States, from somebody with whom you are so well acquainted that you will know how to measure what he says. . . . . All men, I think, are satisfied that our principles of government are about to be put to the test as they never yet have been. The sectional parties, that Washington and Hamilton foresaw as our greatest danger, and which Calhoun, Clay, Webster, and J. Q. Adams died believing they would break up the Union, are now fully formed. . . . From the time of Calhoun, or from the announcement of his dangerous and unsound doctrines, that is, from 1828, to 1832, the people of South Carolina have been gradually coming to the conclusion that it is not for their material interest to continue in the Union. Nearly all have now come to this persuasion. The passages omitted consist of amplifications and citations of facts, which seem nee
Edmund Head (search for this): chapter 21
1859-61, to Sir C. Lyell, Hon. E. Everett, Sir E. Head, C. S. Daveis. To Sir Charles Lyell Yours sincerely, Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, March 26, 1860. I have been know the booksellers announcement. To Sir Edmund Head. Gardiner, Maine, July 26, 1860. My dear Head,—Your letter has come round by Boston, and reached me here, where Mrs. Ticknor and I are ma Faithfully yours, G. Ticknor. From Sir E. Head. ATHENAeUM, [London, ] November 23, 1860. s to Mrs. Ticknor and Anna. Yours truly, Edmund Head. To Sir Charles Lyell, Bart. Boston, Nely. . . . . Commend us to Sir Edmund and Lady Head when you see them. We had a charming visit of the remarkable hours of my life. To Sir Edmund Head, Bart. Boston, April 8, 1861. My dear Head,—We are all asleep here, and have been for some time, personally and politically. . . . All Nosed before in any popular movement. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, April 28, 1861. It [the last[8 more...]<
reely accepted everywhere; by some with alacrity, as the only means of settling a controversy based on long-cherished hatreds; by others as something sent as a judgment from Heaven, like a flood or an earthquake; by all as inevitable, by all as the least of the evils among which we are permitted to choose, anarchy being the obvious, and perhaps the only alternative. Here in Boston the people are constantly gathering about the State House—which you know is in front of my windows—and about Faneuil all, where the troops chiefly assemble or halt on their way through town. When soldiers march by there is grave shouting; nothing like the common cheering. There is an earnestness such as I never witnessed before in any popular movement. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, April 28, 1861. It [the last letter] was written just a week ago, and contained my first impressions about our outbreak at the North. Its character— that of the outbreak—remains the same; much enthusiasm, much deep ear
n them in Europe, and rejoices—as we do here --that there are no complications with the United States. Gladstone, too, he praises, as Reinike says, utermaten; but throws in a little doubt whether his judgment is equal to his genius and virtue. How striking it is, that two such scholars as he and Lewis should have made such capital Chancellors of the Exchequer! I think either of them could, while in office, have stood successfully for a scholarship at Oxford. But what is Lewis doing with Babrius, and what set him out to do anything with him? I only know the booksellers announcement. To Sir Edmund Head. Gardiner, Maine, July 26, 1860. My dear Head,—Your letter has come round by Boston, and reached me here, where Mrs. Ticknor and I are making a visit to our old friends, the Gardiners. I was very glad to get it, and to know that you are safe and well home from your fishing-frolic; and that you had good success. I take it that few of the one hundred and five salmon that were
hundred and five salmon that were slaughtered were killed by any hand but yours. If you get from it strength to face the campaign now impending, it will have done a good work for you. We came here last week, and shall remain till the last day of the present one, when we return home, where I have needful occupations for three or four days. But after that we shall be most happy to join Lady Head, having no engagements from August 5 to September. We shall arrange our affairs so as to go to Gorham, whenever Lady Head advises us that she shall be glad to have us come. It is a good while since I have been in that country, and I shall enjoy it very much; and besides that, I think I shall find it salutary. Since the last winter and spring, when I was a little overworked and run down, I find a tonic atmosphere very useful. . . . . Certainly We shall be at home all the month of October, . . . . and count very much upon your visit. Pray make it as long as you can. . I shall be glad
rd, on our way to the West. Milman is very well; so are the Lyells. I examined Lyell's collection of the flint axe-heads from St. Acheul, in Picardy, contemporaneous with the elephants, etc. Of their human origin there can be no doubt. The evidence of design in their fabrication is as clear as it would be in Paley's watch. Lyell speaks confidently of their geological date. Twisleton and his wife dined at Kent House last night. She is looking peaky from a cold, but otherwise well. Hogarth will resuscitate your print, and I have told him to frame it plainly. There is, I think, a considerable theological movement, since I was last in England, in a rationalistic direction. Kind regards to Mrs. Ticknor and Anna. Yours truly, Edmund Head. To Sir Charles Lyell, Bart. Boston, November 27, 1860. My dear Lyell,—You will be glad, I think, to hear something about the state of affairs in the United States, from somebody with whom you are so well acquainted that you wil
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