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Quebec (Canada) (search for this): chapter 21
to C. and A., and assure them that we shall endeavor to keep up the reputation of our country for humanity. Yours always faithfully, Geo. Ticknor. To Mr. Charles S. Daveis. Boston, October 13, 1860. My dear Charles,—Since I wrote from the Glen, In the White Mountains. I have heard of you-until yesterday-only by accident. Our calculations for our tour in the Mountains were overrun by two days, so that, when we reached Gorham again, I had no time either to see Lady Head off for Quebec, or to stop a night in Portland and see you, both of which I much regretted. Since our nominal return to Boston, which was necessary to keep other engagements, we have been little at home. We made a visit directly to our kinsfolk in Berkshire, Hon. B. R. Curtis and his family. which had been promised three successive years; then we went to New York to buy carpets, missing Cogswell, or, as he pretends, avoiding him by a day; then we went to some friends on the North River; and now we a
Cambria (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 21
as made to feel, at Baden, that there are limits to his power which he must not attempt to pass; and from what I hear, I think he was made to feel it. I shall hardly hear from you again until your flurry is over, The visit of the Prince of Wales to Canada. but Lady Head will tell us all about it. Her case is a new illustration of the beneficent result of the revolution of 1776, which made the United States a refuge for the oppressed. Please give the love of all of us to her, and to C. aons of the second as were adapted to royal ears . . Prince Albert expressed himself to me personally in terms much stronger than were necessary with reference to the Prince's visit. I attributed a large portion of its success to the Prince of Wales's own courtesy and good-nature, which is strictly true. Palmerston and Lord John Russell were at the Castle,—the former vigorous enough to walk upwards of three miles with me and Lord St. Germans in the afternoon of Sunday. Lady Head is toler
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 21
n any similar one in the United States; I suspect a finer building than any we have for any purpose whatever, except the Capitol at Washington. It is in the Norman style of architecture.. . . . But if we are ignorant, as I think we are, about Canada, they are quite as ignorant about us. I think they hardly know more than the people in England do. . . . . We are all well, and send kindest regards. . . . . Yours sincerely, Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, March 26, 1860. o feel, at Baden, that there are limits to his power which he must not attempt to pass; and from what I hear, I think he was made to feel it. I shall hardly hear from you again until your flurry is over, The visit of the Prince of Wales to Canada. but Lady Head will tell us all about it. Her case is a new illustration of the beneficent result of the revolution of 1776, which made the United States a refuge for the oppressed. Please give the love of all of us to her, and to C. and A., and
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
and better adapted to its purposes than any similar one in the United States; I suspect a finer building than any we have for any purpose whjoices—as we do here --that there are no complications with the United States. Gladstone, too, he praises, as Reinike says, utermaten; but tthe beneficent result of the revolution of 1776, which made the United States a refuge for the oppressed. Please give the love of all of us courtesy and friendly bearing towards the Prince, shown in the United States. I may begin from the top, for I had the opportunity of talkind, I think, to hear something about the state of affairs in the United States, from somebody with whom you are so well acquainted that you witable, substantial thinking upon political subjects done in the United States during the next six months, than has been done during the last f the foreign ministers at Washington, and a lover, too, of the United States, writes to me, We are here still in great uncertainty, and the
Gardiner (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ises, as Reinike says, utermaten; but throws in a little doubt whether his judgment is equal to his genius and virtue. How striking it is, that two such scholars as he and Lewis should have made such capital Chancellors of the Exchequer! I think either of them could, while in office, have stood successfully for a scholarship at Oxford. But what is Lewis doing with Babrius, and what set him out to do anything with him? I only know the booksellers announcement. To Sir Edmund Head. Gardiner, Maine, July 26, 1860. My dear Head,—Your letter has come round by Boston, and reached me here, where Mrs. Ticknor and I are making a visit to our old friends, the Gardiners. I was very glad to get it, and to know that you are safe and well home from your fishing-frolic; and that you had good success. I take it that few of the one hundred and five salmon that were slaughtered were killed by any hand but yours. If you get from it strength to face the campaign now impending, it will have d
Newfoundland (Canada) (search for this): chapter 21
t. I have taken measures for letting the Queen see such portions of your letter as bear directly on the benefits likely to accrue to both countries, and I hope you will not think me indiscreet in doing so.. . . . The other thing is, that the open cordiality of the people here has rebuked and silenced anything that remained, in newspaper editors and reporters, of the old feelings of ill — will toward your country. I have watched the tone of our papers ever since the Prince touched at Newfoundland, and have observed how their tone has gradually changed, from occasional touches of ill manners to such as are unexceptionable. This is especially true of the old democratic papers; those, I mean, that have always taken sides against England, from the time of the French Revolution. It is most desirable, and important, that this tone in our newspapers should be kept up, and that it should be met in a similar spirit by yours. On this point, both sides have heretofore behaved badly enough
Gorham (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
e oppressed. Please give the love of all of us to her, and to C. and A., and assure them that we shall endeavor to keep up the reputation of our country for humanity. Yours always faithfully, Geo. Ticknor. To Mr. Charles S. Daveis. Boston, October 13, 1860. My dear Charles,—Since I wrote from the Glen, In the White Mountains. I have heard of you-until yesterday-only by accident. Our calculations for our tour in the Mountains were overrun by two days, so that, when we reached Gorham again, I had no time either to see Lady Head off for Quebec, or to stop a night in Portland and see you, both of which I much regretted. Since our nominal return to Boston, which was necessary to keep other engagements, we have been little at home. We made a visit directly to our kinsfolk in Berkshire, Hon. B. R. Curtis and his family. which had been promised three successive years; then we went to New York to buy carpets, missing Cogswell, or, as he pretends, avoiding him by a day; t
Lunenburg, Ma. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
d. Since our nominal return to Boston, which was necessary to keep other engagements, we have been little at home. We made a visit directly to our kinsfolk in Berkshire, Hon. B. R. Curtis and his family. which had been promised three successive years; then we went to New York to buy carpets, missing Cogswell, or, as he pretends, avoiding him by a day; then we went to some friends on the North River; and now we are just come back from Savage's, Mr. James Savage's country-place at Lunenburg, in the northern part of Massachusetts. where we have been due since 1855. Of course the few intervening days at home have been busy enough. The practical result, however, of the whole is, that we have had an uncommonly pleasant summer,—generally a gay one for old folks,—and that we are now in excellent health, gathered comfortably to our own hearthstone, with good pluck to encounter a New England winter, which the two Annas like less than I do. Touching the Prince's visit,—of which y<
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
from 1828, to 1832, the people of South Carolina have been gradually coming to the conclusion that it is not for their material interest to continue in the Union. Nearly all have now come to this persuasion. The passages omitted consist of amplifications and citations of facts, which seem needless now, and occupy much space. . . . . They care little whether any other State goes with them; so extravagantly excited have they become . . . . The State most likely to go with them is Alabama. Georgia is very much excited, and very unsound, as we think; and Florida, a State of less consequence, is quite ready to go . . . . . South Carolina, however, is the only State about which, at this moment, there seems little or no doubt. But property everywhere is the great bond of society; and in our slave-holding States the negroes constitute an extraordinary proportion of the wealth of the people. . . . . This property, which, at the time when the Constitution was formed, existed in nearly all
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
eminent for his talents and position, who has exercised much influence through the border States against secession during the last four months. But he is now much disheartened. He says that disunion sentiments are gaining ground in Virginia and Maryland. He feels, as I think I told you I do, that we are drifting, and that nobody knows where we shall fetch up. An intimate friend, he says, and as I think the clearest-headed of the foreign ministers at Washington, and a lover, too, of the United s most strikingly. The people is the practical sovereign, and, until the people had been appealed to, and had moved, the Administration, whether of Buchanan or of Lincoln, could act with little efficiency. We drifted. Now the rudder is felt. Maryland must yield, or become a battle-ground over which the opposing forces will roll their floods alternately. Baltimore must open her gates, or the city will be all but razed. At least, so far we seem to see ahead. But the people, the sovereign,
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