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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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ates, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. On the other hand, it was objected to on the first vote by three Southern States, Virginia, North Carolina, and Missouri; Virginia and North. Carolina objecting because of the clause which referred the legal status of slavery south of the line to the decisions of Federal courts, while the first clause made prohibition absolute without such reference; while Missouri disliked it because of its old hostility to the dividing line. On the second vote the section was adopted, with New England against it. Important sections of the report which related to the jurisdiction of Congress over slavery in the States and District of Columbia, and to compensate the owners of fugitive slaves where their property could not be repossessed, together with other minor sections of the series, were discussed and variously determined until finally seven sections were passed and presented to the Senate of the United States. The plan differed in several
be sectional, the use of the powers of the Union and the distribution of its benefits will be mainly sectional. The country generally and the South uneasily understood this to be the result when the government passed out of the hands of national statesmen. The salient statements in the platform were against the peculiar Southern institution, as slavery was unfairly called, for it was not instituted by the South but was most properly a trust cast upon its care by the authors of it. On the third ballot Mr. Lincoln, of Illi. nois, was nominated for the Presidency, and immediately afterward Mr. Hamlin, of Maine, was named for the second office. A patriotic attempt was made, chiefly by the Whigs and Americans, to make a fight for the Union under the name of the Constitutional Union Party, whose brief platform merely committed their candidates to the Constitution, the Union, and the enforcement of the laws. The nominees of this body of conservative men were John Bell, of Tennessee
eclined because he considered the expedition to be too late to be successful. Colonel H. L. Scott, aide to General Scott, was directed by confidential orders to supply recruits, but he ridiculed the idea of the government relieving Sumter and the owners of tugs so generally refused to risk their vessels that only three could be hired at exorbitant rates. Supplies, however, were easily purchased, and the expedition was thoroughly provisioned. All being made ready, the Powhatan sailed on the 6th. The messenger from Washington was started the same day to Governor Pickens to notify him that faith as to Sumter fully kept meant that the fort would be provisioned as soon as he would consent for it to be done; otherwise the fleet and Maj. Anderson were prepared to see that the fort was held and reinforced. The tug Uncle Ben steamed out on the 7th, the Harriet Lane and the tug Yankee on the 8th, the Pawnee and the Baltic on the 9th, the Pocahontas on the 10th. This considerable fleet, co
es. Supplies, however, were easily purchased, and the expedition was thoroughly provisioned. All being made ready, the Powhatan sailed on the 6th. The messenger from Washington was started the same day to Governor Pickens to notify him that faith as to Sumter fully kept meant that the fort would be provisioned as soon as he would consent for it to be done; otherwise the fleet and Maj. Anderson were prepared to see that the fort was held and reinforced. The tug Uncle Ben steamed out on the 7th, the Harriet Lane and the tug Yankee on the 8th, the Pawnee and the Baltic on the 9th, the Pocahontas on the 10th. This considerable fleet, commissioned to execute the plan of Captain Fox, encountered a heavy gale, which continued during the whole passage, delaying the voyage so much that the rendezvous at Charleston did not begin until the 11th or 12th, the Harriet Lane being the first vessel to arrive. All finally arrived, and in addition to the fleet, the steamer Nashville and a number o
l convention to pass resolutions, amending the Constitution. The Missouri legislature passed a bill calling a convention and other measures looking to secession. The governor of North Carolina opened correspondence with President Buchanan on the 8th, involving the subject of the rumored reinforcement of the forts, through which the governor was persuaded that the status quo would be observed. The sentiment of the State was described at the time by one of its well-informed citizens as followsd be provisioned as soon as he would consent for it to be done; otherwise the fleet and Maj. Anderson were prepared to see that the fort was held and reinforced. The tug Uncle Ben steamed out on the 7th, the Harriet Lane and the tug Yankee on the 8th, the Pawnee and the Baltic on the 9th, the Pocahontas on the 10th. This considerable fleet, commissioned to execute the plan of Captain Fox, encountered a heavy gale, which continued during the whole passage, delaying the voyage so much that the
ept—wait and see. On the next day, April 8th, the eyes of the commissioners, which had been blinded for twenty-three days, were opened, and they saw that they had been deliberately duped. Another communication was therefore sent by them on the 9th, addressed to Mr. Seward, which recapitulated the transactions of their official sojourn in Washington, and in indignant language boldly said to the Secretary. had you met these issues with the frankness and manliness with which the undersigned wonsent for it to be done; otherwise the fleet and Maj. Anderson were prepared to see that the fort was held and reinforced. The tug Uncle Ben steamed out on the 7th, the Harriet Lane and the tug Yankee on the 8th, the Pawnee and the Baltic on the 9th, the Pocahontas on the 10th. This considerable fleet, commissioned to execute the plan of Captain Fox, encountered a heavy gale, which continued during the whole passage, delaying the voyage so much that the rendezvous at Charleston did not begin
dy, the Powhatan sailed on the 6th. The messenger from Washington was started the same day to Governor Pickens to notify him that faith as to Sumter fully kept meant that the fort would be provisioned as soon as he would consent for it to be done; otherwise the fleet and Maj. Anderson were prepared to see that the fort was held and reinforced. The tug Uncle Ben steamed out on the 7th, the Harriet Lane and the tug Yankee on the 8th, the Pawnee and the Baltic on the 9th, the Pocahontas on the 10th. This considerable fleet, commissioned to execute the plan of Captain Fox, encountered a heavy gale, which continued during the whole passage, delaying the voyage so much that the rendezvous at Charleston did not begin until the 11th or 12th, the Harriet Lane being the first vessel to arrive. All finally arrived, and in addition to the fleet, the steamer Nashville and a number of merchant vessels anchoring near the bar increased the imposing naval demonstration. A portion of the war ships
, appoint one immediately, and renew the effort to enter into conference with the view to secure peace to the two countries. Jefferson Davis. With this important letter Mr. Blair returned to Washington, and showing it to President Lincoln, obtained from him a communication designed to be read by the Confederate President. This letter, also addressed to Mr. Blair, and dated at Washington, January 18, 1865, was as follows: Sir: You having shown me Mr. Davis' letter to you of the 12th instant, you may say to him that I have constantly been, am now and shall continue ready to receive any agent whom he or any other influential person now resisting the national authority may informally send to me with the view of securing peace to the people of our one common country. Abraham Lincoln. Thus far the preliminaries seemed to gratify Mr. Blair, It was well you wrote me that letter, he said to Mr. Davis when he reached Richmond, on his second visit bearing the letter from Mr. Linc
of the country and do not at all embrace questions arising between the several States and the Federal government he cannot hold correspondence with them. The memorandum also referred the Confederate commissioners to the inaugural of the President for information as to the policy of his administration. Thus it appears that all negotiation would be waived away by a decision that a State had no way of official access to the general government. The memorandum, alleged to have been filed on the 13th, was withheld from the public and also from the commissioners, although they were urging an answer. The commissioners were told that Mr. Seward desired to avoid making any reply at that time. Mr. Justice Nelson, a personal friend of Mr. Seward, gave this information to Mr. Justice Campbell, his associate in the same court, with the assurance that Mr. Seward had a strong disposition for peace. This information caused Judge Campbell, who was a personal friend of the commissioners, to agree t
the indomitable Fox persisted in hoping that all the elements of his carefully planned attack on Sumter would yet get together. Pursuing this hope he organized a boat's crew, pulled in to the Pawnee from the Harriet Lane, purposing to make an effort to reach Sumter with provisions even in the absence of the tug boats, but the heavy sea forbade the venture. An ice schooner was then captured and loaded for entering the harbor at night. But in the afternoon the fort was surrendered. On the 14th it was evacuated, on the 15th the garrison was taken to the Baltic, and Fort Sumter went into the peaceable possession of the Confederacy. Captain Fox's plan was designed to secure the reinforcement of Fort Sumter peaceably if the Confederates consented, but forcibly if they objected. The objections of South Carolina at first and the subsequent declarations of the Confederate States had been very plainly made. It was understood on both sides that the attempt to reinforce by provisions and
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