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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Utah (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
uri, proposed the recognition of the old Missouri Compromise line through all the new territory, but his proposition was rejected. Mr. Stanton, of Tennessee, then asked for a law that the admission of no State out of territory south of 36° 30′ should be objected to because its constitution authorized slavery, which was refused by nearly an exclusively sectional vote. At this juncture Mr. Soule, of Louisiana, proposed a test vote by an amendment to Utah Territorial bill simply declaring that Utah shall be received into the Union with or without slavery as its constitution may prescribe at the time of its admission. This raised the question whether under any circumstances, another State authorizing the use of slave labor would be allowed to emerge from the Territorial into State government. It has been said that the fate of the compromise, with all its happy consequences, rested at that hour on one man. That man was the august Senator from Massachusetts—Daniel Webster. Upon his spee
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
was satisfactory to the administration for the time, and an agreement was then made with the mayor of Baltimore that troops should not be sent through the city. Annapolis was then substituted as the rendezvous en route to Washington, but finally the occupation of Maryland was made complete. Orders rapidly followed to place troopsncentrated against Maryland. In less than five days after the unfortunate occurrences on the 19th of April in Baltimore, the Federal troops were passing through Annapolis to Washington. A joint movement was contemplated from Philadelphia and Annapolis against Baltimore. The legislature was called to meet at Frederick City and thAnnapolis against Baltimore. The legislature was called to meet at Frederick City and the spirit of resistance pervaded many parts of the State. But the disadvantages were too great to be overcome and in a few weeks Baltimore was held by the Federal army. President Davis issued a proclamation on the 12th of April previously to the fight for Fort Sumter, convening the Congress on the 29th, prompted by the declarati
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 6
eir attempts to overthrow the Republic, and describing the disturbance at home as a transient affair. Again on April 24th the Secretary forwarded a more formal and impressive letter to those ministers who were appointed to Great Britain, France, Russia, Prussia, Austria, Belgium, Italy and Denmark, specially relating to the question of neutrality in war. This diplomatic correspondence exhibits the early anxiety of the United States concerning the attitude of these great nations. It is understoupon the significant declaration by the European powers that the execution of privateersmen would be inhuman, and an ineffective blockade would not be tolerated. Spain and Portugal published brief proclamations of neutrality, but the Emperor of Russia through a letter of Gortschakoff to the Russian minister at Washington, expressed his unfriendliness to secession and conveyed his assur-ance that in every event the American nation may count upon his most cordial sympathy during the import-ant c
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ssity of recognizing the independence of the Confederacy. Southern cotton was at that time seeking new channels to the sea. It was going up the Mississippi and Ohio rivers and by rail through Tennessee and Virginia to Norfolk. Railroad managers were beginning to offer inducements to the shipment of cotton, the result of all whichefenses were threatened in all Western points, and a general alarm was felt that the Confederacy would be split in halves by the resolute advances made from the Ohio river, and along the Mississippi. The governors of Tennessee and Georgia were aroused to special activity, the latter on account of the invasion threatening the seabthe efficiency of the military corps. Besides this disadvantage the area of food supply had shrunken one half. At first nearly the entire country south of the Ohio river, and even in some measure beyond, could be relied on for the means of subsistence. But now a large part of Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee and North Carolina wer
Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
amount to no more than dead men. At this particular time to release all rebel prisoners north would insure Sherman's defeat and would compromise our safety here. This remarkable confession was made with thorough knowledge of the vast resources of the United States. But General Grant did not assume this responsibility without the previous sanction of the civil government The policy had been fixed at Washington, and the cabinet secret was divulged in a speech by General Butler at Lowell, Massachusetts, August, 1865, in which he informed the public that this continued imprisonment of Union as well as Confederate soldiers was the policy of Mr. Stanton, the secretary of war. In the speech he stated positively that he had been ordered by Mr. Stanton to put forward the negro question to complicate and prevent exchanges, and he boastfully declared at another time that he had discharged this task so offensively as to produce the required result, thus justifying the charge made by other
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
the States that certain senators from Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas, Mississippi and Florida held a meeting in Washington, on Jd to do this the legislature on the 24th, called a convention. In Arkansas the general sentiment favored the call of a convention, which the the States from invasion. Virginia, South Carolina, Tennessee and Arkansas necessarily seceded, while Missouri and Kentucky announced their pn the Confederate army without regard to the place of enlistment. Arkansas was admitted into the Confederacy, and Virginia being also recognihe Confederacy was divided into two distinct parts. Tennessee and Arkansas had been cleared of insurgent control; emancipation was accepted i says the Confederate President, to regret losses in Tennessee and Arkansas, we are not without ground for congratulation on successes in Louinate were Clay and Jemison from Alabama; Johnson and Mitchell from Arkansas; Baker and Maxwell from Florida; Hill and Johnson from Georgia; Bu
Manchester (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
be, of Virginia; and Thompson, of Mississippi, three among the most eminent men of the South, constituted the committee on the part of the South, and selected Niagara Falls, on-the border, as the place where they might meet such Northern statesmen as would interest themselves in the cause of peace. Horace Greeley at that time devgnition of the friendly movement, causing by this withdrawal of his favor an unfortunate and deeply regretted failure. The conference proposed to be held at Niagara Falls was of much greater significance than any peace movement of this important date. The action of the Confederacy in stationing the three eminent statesmen in a rity for every drop of blood that was thereafter shed and every dollar that was thereafter spent. Thus urged, the President requested Greeley to go quietly to Niagara Falls and find out what he could; a request which the great peacemaker eagerly accepted. Mr. George N. Sanders, a prominent politician of the Douglas school, was fo
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
rgia. The following voted nay: New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Virginia. Slave labor, thecontrol of the Hudson, and the accession of Pennsylvania, with the control of the Susquehanna. Th New York and Ohio voted for Fremont, while Pennsylvania was barely saved. All New England was conshe National Republican Party, but Jesup, of Pennsylvania, objected to the word national, and it was ctions, vol. 2, pp. 199-203.) The States of Pennsylvania, Indiana, New Jersey and Delaware were conson of this great constitutional lawyer from Pennsylvania and on the judgment of his cabinet, compose of four Northern States, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island. On the other hand, it w once extended over Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania, by General Scott, and posts were ordered t Democratic convention. Governor Bigler, of Pennsylvania, was made temporary chairman, and Governor Deleware, Oregon, New Jersey, Maryland and Pennsylvania the vote was close it yet appeared in the f[9 more...]
Meridian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
This disparity of numbers though great, was less important than the difference in the resources of the two governments, and the only advantage which can be placed to the account of the South was its position as the defender of its soil. The fighting opened for the year with surprising victories for the Southern armies. At Olustee, Florida, General Finegan and General Colquitt signally defeated General Seymour, and rescued a large part of that State. General Sherman had captured Meridian, in Mississippi, but was forced to beat a retreat to Vicksburg on account of the destruction of his cavalry by Forrest. In April Taylor attacked Banks at Mansfield, Louisiana, and drove him with great loss back to New Orleans. Hoke captured Plymouth, North Carolina, and the raid of Kilpatrick, with the disreputable accompaniment of the Dahlgren effort to burn Richmond and murder President Davis and his cabinet, were both defeated. But these affairs did not affect the general course which milit
Olustee (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
f whom it is stated that about one half were effective and in the field. The Federal force on duty at various places is officially reported as over a million men. This disparity of numbers though great, was less important than the difference in the resources of the two governments, and the only advantage which can be placed to the account of the South was its position as the defender of its soil. The fighting opened for the year with surprising victories for the Southern armies. At Olustee, Florida, General Finegan and General Colquitt signally defeated General Seymour, and rescued a large part of that State. General Sherman had captured Meridian, in Mississippi, but was forced to beat a retreat to Vicksburg on account of the destruction of his cavalry by Forrest. In April Taylor attacked Banks at Mansfield, Louisiana, and drove him with great loss back to New Orleans. Hoke captured Plymouth, North Carolina, and the raid of Kilpatrick, with the disreputable accompaniment of the
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