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A. R. Wright (search for this): chapter 24
e reaching our lines, except once during the afternoon on Hancock's front, and just after night on Sedgwick's front. In the former instance they were promptly and handsomely repulsed; the latter, Milroy's old brigade was attacked and gave away in the greatest confusion, almost without resistance, carrying good troops with them. Had there been daylight the enemy could have injured us very much in the confusion that prevailed; they, however, instead of getting through the break, attacked General Wright's division of Sedgwick's corps, and were driven back. After confessing that his loss had been about 12,000, and mentioning his killed, wounded and captured generals, he added: I think the loss of the enemy must exceed ours, but this is only a guess based upon the fact that they attacked and were repulsed so often—a statement that is rather remarkable, in the light of his subsequent reports, when he accounts for his enormous losses by saying that, during all the campaign, he had to a
C. M. Wilcox (search for this): chapter 24
Spotswood, had built the first blastfur-nace for making iron, in America—the impending conflict would begin, immediate preparations for which he took in hand on returning to his camp. Lee was accompanied to his point of observation by Longstreet, just returned from his Tennessee campaign; Field, commanding Hood's old division, and Kershaw, that of McLaws; Ewell, and his division commanders, Early, Edward Johnson and Rodes; A. P. Hill, with his division commanders, R. H. Anderson, Heth and Wilcox. It is said that after his information-seeking overlook of the Federal camps, Lee turned to these officers, and pointing toward Chancellorsville, said, that in his opinion, the Federal army would cross at Germanna or at Ely's; and that he then bade them prepare to take up the line of march whenever orders were given from the signal station. When Grant ordered his forward movement, on the 4th of May, there were 147,000 men under his command, in and near Culpeper, disposed in three grand a
Williams Fanning Wickham (search for this): chapter 24
ll, near Orange Court House; some 17,000, under Ewell, in the Mountain run valley; 10,000 in Longstreet's two divisions, encamped near Gordonsville; 224 guns in his batteries, manned by 4,800 artillerists; and 8,300 cavalrymen, under the leadership of Jeb Stuart. The cavalry corps was in two divisions, of three brigades each; the First, led by Wade Hampton, of South Carolina; the Second, by Fitz Lee, of Virginia. Fitz Lee's three brigades, commanded by W. H. F. Lee, L. L. Lomax and Williams F. Wickham, were all from Virginia. At the opening of the campaign, Stuart's cavalry held the line of the lower Rapidan and of the lower Rappahannock, guarding Lee's right flank. Stuart informed Lee of the arrival of Grant's army, on the north bank of the Rapidan, opposite the Germanna and Ely fords, on the 3d of May, and of the crossing of those fords by his advance on the next day. Knowing this, Lee, on the morning of the 4th, issued his usual precautionary orders against the destruction o
rs near Locust Grove, on the old turnpike, with his advance but an hour's march from Grant's passing flank, on the same road, at the Wilderness run. Lee's second column, under Hill, which Lee accompanied, had its headquarters at Verdiersville, some four miles to the southwest from Ewell's, while Longstreet, that night, reached Brock's bridge, on the North Anna, on the old road that Lafayette had cut through the forest, to the northeastward, to Verdiersville, in order to form a junction with Wayne, and which, to this day, is known as the Marquis' road. During the night of the 4th, Lee sent orders to Ewell to march upon the enemy at daylight of the 5th, desiring to bring him to battle now as soon as possible. He ordered Hill forward at the same hour, and himself promptly rode to the front, along the plank road, and was with the pickets when the skirmish opened, at Parker's store, on that road, at the head of the Wilderness run, three miles south of the old Wilderness tavern, where
George Washington (search for this): chapter 24
h day of May. At the close of this day, Lee held, all along his lines, a position advanced from that held in the morning, and the great army of the Potomac found itself in the toils of a defensive struggle, in aid of which it was throwing up new lines of breastworks, along the positions to which it had been forced back on its right and along its center, and was grimly holding on to the triple line of defenses that guarded its left. On the morning of the 7th, at 10, Grant telegraphed to Washington, from the Wilderness tavern: We were engaged with the enemy nearly all day, both on the 5th and the 6th. Yesterday the enemy attacked our lines vigorously, first at one point and then another, from right to left. They were repulsed at all points before reaching our lines, except once during the afternoon on Hancock's front, and just after night on Sedgwick's front. In the former instance they were promptly and handsomely repulsed; the latter, Milroy's old brigade was attacked and ga
es the road to Spottsylvania Court House, that Warren was following to the southeast. The Sixth corishers were in lively engagement with those of Warren, advanced to protect his flank on the GermannaJones' brigade in skirmish front, pressed back Warren's skirmishers, and came in full view of his cois skirmish line, which Griffin's division, of Warren's corps, took for a retreat, and so pressed upHeth had met and driven back Crawford, leading Warren to the southward. Heth pushed his advantage io, with the wide interval already made between Warren and Hancock, have struck the latter in flank, this battle, at 5 in the morning, by attacking Warren and Sedgwick. The engagement quickly extendedh troops to make attack on Lee's center, while Warren and Sedgwick assaulted the right and Hancock trs for a night march by the Fifth corps, under Warren, along the Brock road, in the rear of Hancock'for the first day's march will stand thus: General Warren's corps at Spottsylvania Court House; Hanc[5 more...]
Francis A. Walker (search for this): chapter 24
four brigades, to turn Hancock's left, which they did, under shelter of the cuts and fills of the partially graded Orange railroad, and then, moving forward, struck Hancock's flank and rolled it up, as Hancock himself said, like a wet blanket. By 10 o'clock, Lee's counterstroke, on Hancock's front and flank, had driven back his brigades and broken up his right, under Wadsworth; and by noon, Grant's entire left had been defeated and disorganized. Hancock's chief of staff, the truth-telling Walker, says of this time: Down the plank road from Hancock's center a stream of broken men was pouring to the rear, giving the onlooker the impression that everything had gone to pieces. Longstreet urged forward his men to press the enemy. The dried leaves of the preceding autumn took fire from blazing cartridges, and their smoke, joining with that of battle, clouded the day and concealed the combatants from each other. Forming Kershaw's division in line of battle, across the plank road, Long
ll promptly moved forward the brigades of Gordon and Daniel, crushed Griffin's victory disordered advance, and fell on the flank of the divisions of Crawford and Wadsworth. These he routed, and captured four Federal guns and many prisoners. Warren closed up his corps front, with his left retired, through the forest, toward Wilder advance, again assaulting Hill's weak line (that Lee had expected to replace with Longstreet, before daylight), but which he could not force from its position. Wadsworth moved against Hill's left flank, at the same time that Hancock developed a large force around his right. Thus flanked, Hill was forced from the field, stubbornlhimself said, like a wet blanket. By 10 o'clock, Lee's counterstroke, on Hancock's front and flank, had driven back his brigades and broken up his right, under Wadsworth; and by noon, Grant's entire left had been defeated and disorganized. Hancock's chief of staff, the truth-telling Walker, says of this time: Down the plank road
into the main roads leading directly to Richmond. Gregg's cavalry, moving along a parallel road to the southwest, toward Todd's tavern and Spottsylvania Court House, protected his flank from the incursions of Stuart's cavalry. Warren's corps had luart's cavalry were already skirmishing with those of Gregg, on the Brock road, in front of and far to Lee's right, toward Todd's tavern, while Ewell's skirmishers were in lively engagement with those of Warren, advanced to protect his flank on the Gn the same general direction, and Sedgwick to close up at the Wilderness tavern. Hancock, obeying his orders, had reached Todd's tavern, on the Brock road, and was turning to the southwest, by the Catharpin road, toward Shady Grove church, scarcely sition assigned for the first day's march will stand thus: General Warren's corps at Spottsylvania Court House; Hancock at Todd's tavern; Sedgwick on the road from Piney Branch church to Spottsylvania, and General Burnside at Aldrich's. It is not dem
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
ld fields of unsuccessful Federal venture. Looking eastward, Mine run and Chancellorsville were in sight. Beyond, in mental vision, he could see Salem church and thok of the Federal camps, Lee turned to these officers, and pointing toward Chancellorsville, said, that in his opinion, the Federal army would cross at Germanna or atancock's corps, crossing at Ely's ford, had encamped on the battlefield of Chancellorsville, whence a good highway led southward, by way of Spottsylvania Court House,s its men were cooking their suppers, as was Hooker's right when struck at Chancellorsville, and quickly routed a mile of Sedgwick's line, capturing 600 of his men agwick, withdrawing from Ewell's front after dark, was to march eastward to Chancellorsville, and then southward to Piney Branch church, and Burnside was to withdraw from Hill's front, and, marching to the eastward of Chancellorsville, then turn south, thus covering the road to Fredericksburg, in his rear, along which Grant was sen
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