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Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
North Fork of the Potomac, on the road leading northwest from Franklin. William L. Jackson's brigade, with headquarters at the Warm Springs, picketed the line of Jackson's river, at Hightown and points to the south of that, Cheat mountain, on the Staunton and Parkersburg turnpike, near the Big Spring beyond Marlinton, and points ifor Dublin Depot in southwest Virginia, and McCausland's came to Fishersville, en route to its winter quarters in Alleghany and Greenbrier counties. On the 20th, Jackson's cavalry came, from toward Gordonsville, on its way to winter quarters in Bath and adjacent counties. On the 22d the Federal cavalry captured Early's picket at o their homes, and of deserters and skulkers that were coming out of their holes. The cavalry from Grant's army reached Lynchburg on the 13th. The remnants of Jackson's and Lomax's divisions of cavalry, that had retired to the Valley, disbanded at Buchanan, on the 15th, until the 1st of May. On the 17th it was learned that Gen
Rose River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
, Nelson's battalion of artillery, and the cavalry of Lomax and Rosser. Early established his headquarters in Staunton, placed his artillery in a camp near Waynesboro, cantoned Wharton's infantry near Fishersville, and widely and far to the front distributed his cavalry—practically almost disbanded it—on outpost duty, in Piedmont, in the Valley and in Appalachia, in camps where forage could be obtained for their horses. Wickham's brigade of cavalry at Barboursville, held the line of Robertson river from its head near Milam's gap, and down the Rapidan to the vicinity of Raccoon ford. Rosser's brigade, with headquarters at Swoope's, eight miles west of Staunton, had its advanced pickets at Milford, in the Page valley of the Shenandoah, on the line of Stony creek near Edenburg, in the main Shenandoah valley, at Harper's Ferry, on Lost river, and on the South Fork of the Potomac, some miles south of Moorefield, while on the west it occupied McDowell. Imboden's brigade, with headqua
Cheat Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
orefield, and the North Fork of the Potomac, on the road leading northwest from Franklin. William L. Jackson's brigade, with headquarters at the Warm Springs, picketed the line of Jackson's river, at Hightown and points to the south of that, Cheat mountain, on the Staunton and Parkersburg turnpike, near the Big Spring beyond Marlinton, and points in the upper Greenbrier valley. McCausland's brigade, with headquarters at Callahan's, west of Covington, had a camp of observation near the White Suencamped at Yeager's, on the Back Alleghany, near the old encampment of Gen. Edward Johnson during the previous winter. On the 9th, crossing Greenbrier river and the Cheat mountains and river, he encamped at Stipe's, near the western foot of Cheat mountain, not far from Huttonsville. On the 10th, marching through Huttonsville and down Tygart's valley, he attacked the Federal camp, that night, at Beverly, having proceeded from Huttonsville on byways east of the Tygart's Valley river, and thus w
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
orward with great energy, and having at his command some 5,500 men, nearly twice as many as Breckinridge could get together, Stoneman drove Vaughn's and Duke's commands before him, and pressing on passed Glade Spring, paying no attention to the Confederate force at Saltville, until he was delayed, by an action at Marion, on the 16th, but only for a short time, as his superior force enabled him to flank Breckinridge's command and compel the larger portion of it to retreat southward toward North Carolina. Riding rapidly still further up the valley, Stoneman was again opposed, in a skirmish at Mt. Airy, on the 17th and 18th. Detaching a portion of his command from Marion to destroy the lead works, by way of the Rye valley, he sent another portion on to Wytheville, where it destroyed a number of warehouses filled with army supplies, burning a church that had been used for this purpose, and destroying the railway bridges and stations for a few miles northeastward of Wytheville. Having
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
Chapter 31: Closing events in southwest Virginia and the Valley. Very serious damage was inflicted on the Confederates in Virgieorge Stoneman, of the Federal army, from east Tennessee into southwest Virginia, mainly for the purpose of destroying the salt works at Saltville, from which not only the State of Virginia and the Confederate armies, but also adjacent States of the Confederacy, drew their supplies . J. C. Breckinridge, in command of the Confederate forces in southwest Virginia, having been duly advised of the movements of Stoneman's commsely cold and inclement weather. The damage inflicted upon southwest Virginia by this Federal. raid, in the destruction of railway and turneral Lee at Petersburg, and King's battalion of artillery to southwest Virginia. Subsequent withdrawals left Early's army consisting of two ' old brigade of Wharton's division, left for Dublin Depot in southwest Virginia, and McCausland's came to Fishersville, en route to its winte
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
Virginia line, and at the same time to damage, as much as possible, the Virginia & East Tennessee railroad, extending from Lynchburg to Bristol, from which large supplies of food and forage were sent to the army of Northern Virginia. Leaving Knoxville, December 10, 1864, General Gillem's command united. with Stoneman's, which had advanced from Cumberland gap, near Bean's Station, east Tennessee, on the 12th, and had a skirmish with the outposts of Gen. Basil Duke near Rogersville; then an aestablishment. On the 22d he retired from Saltville. Burbridge's portion of his command then returned westward, by the way of Pound gap, on the 27th, to Catlettsburg, at the mouth of the Big Sandy in Kentucky, and Gillem's command returned to Knoxville on the 29th, reporting that it had marched 461 miles during this expedition, in intensely cold and inclement weather. The damage inflicted upon southwest Virginia by this Federal. raid, in the destruction of railway and turnpike bridges, r
Millboro (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
rom Franklin. William L. Jackson's brigade, with headquarters at the Warm Springs, picketed the line of Jackson's river, at Hightown and points to the south of that, Cheat mountain, on the Staunton and Parkersburg turnpike, near the Big Spring beyond Marlinton, and points in the upper Greenbrier valley. McCausland's brigade, with headquarters at Callahan's, west of Covington, had a camp of observation near the White Sulphur Springs and picketed at Lewisburg. Lomax had his headquarters at Millboro, on the Virginia Central railroad, and Payne's brigade was encamped near Lexington. Such was the disposition, in widely scattered camps of a few cavalrymen at each place, many miles from headquarters, with numerous intervening mountains and streams to cross, when Sheridan began his second Valley campaign, starting from Winchester on the 27th of February, 1865. Rosser's expedition to Beverly, western Virginia, was one of the striking episodes of the early part of the year 1865. Leaving
Farmville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
greatly excited at the near approach of the enemy from the west, a few hundred as reported, and the citizens had determined to surrender the place. General Lomax soon restored confidence, and collecting convalescents and other soldiers that had straggled in, he took possession of the trenches covering the front of the city; but soon learning that the force from the west had retired, and hearing rumors that disaster had overtaken General Lee's army at Appomattox Station, he marched toward Farmville, but returned and encamped near Lynchburg, his command having traveled 36 miles. On Sunday, April 9th, General Lomax, accompanied by Engineer Hotchkiss, made an inspection of the defenses of Lynchburg, then went to his camp, three miles down the James, where rumor after rumor came in, saying that General Lee had had a battle on the 8th, losing most of his train and artillery; and that there was further combat on the morning of the 9th, when he had surrendered. These rumors were confirm
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
Closing events in southwest Virginia and the Valley. Very serious damage was inflicted on the Confederates in Virginia in the last of December, 1864, by the raid, or expedition, of Gen. George Stoneman, of the Federal army, from east Tennessee into southwest Virginia, mainly for the purpose of destroying the salt works at Saltville, from which not only the State of Virginia and the Confederate armies, but also adjacent States of the Confederacy, drew their supplies of salt; the leahe larger proportion of its supply of lead for its ordnance department, and the numerous niter works in operation in that part of Virginia. The further object of this expedition was to drive away the Confederate cavalry that was wintering in east Tennessee and Virginia, not far from the Virginia line, and at the same time to damage, as much as possible, the Virginia & East Tennessee railroad, extending from Lynchburg to Bristol, from which large supplies of food and forage were sent to the army
Hightown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 30
on Lost river, and on the South Fork of the Potomac, some miles south of Moorefield, while on the west it occupied McDowell. Imboden's brigade, with headquarters at the Upper Tract in Pendleton county, some ten miles north of Franklin, picketed the South Branch of the Potomac, well toward Moorefield, and the North Fork of the Potomac, on the road leading northwest from Franklin. William L. Jackson's brigade, with headquarters at the Warm Springs, picketed the line of Jackson's river, at Hightown and points to the south of that, Cheat mountain, on the Staunton and Parkersburg turnpike, near the Big Spring beyond Marlinton, and points in the upper Greenbrier valley. McCausland's brigade, with headquarters at Callahan's, west of Covington, had a camp of observation near the White Sulphur Springs and picketed at Lewisburg. Lomax had his headquarters at Millboro, on the Virginia Central railroad, and Payne's brigade was encamped near Lexington. Such was the disposition, in widely sc
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