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Browsing named entities in John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion.

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Chapter 12: Cold Harbor. June 1-12, 1864. By the left flank to Cold Harbor three positions the assault and repulse a night attack mortars and bomb-proofs the Saucy Battery an Armistice. Early on the night of the 1st, [says Hancock, in his official report,] I commenced withdrawing my corps in obedience to instructions from the Major General commanding. My orders required me to mass near army headquarters, but were afterwards changed, and I was directed to make every effort to reach Cold Harbor as early as possible to reinforce Wright's (Sixth Corps) left. Every exertion was made; but the night was dark, the heat and dust oppressive, and the roads unknown. Still we should have reached Cold Harbor in good season; but Capt. Paine, topographical engineer, who had been ordered to report to me to guide my column, unfortunately took one of my divisions by a short cut where artillery could not follow, which threw my column into confusion. .... The head of my column
once sent, and we found already encamped here the Fourteenth New Hampshire and Thirty-ninth Massachusetts regiments, commanded by Colonels Wilson and Davis, respectively. How are you, Boxford? was the greeting from the latter regiment as soon as we were recognized, and it seemed like meeting old friends to fall in with those who had been encamped with us on the soil of Massachusetts. We were now considered to be in the enemy's country, and great vigilance was thought necessary. On the second morning we were aroused at 4 o'clock, and turning out in the darkness, hastily harnessed, only to find when everything was ready, that it was a hoax to see how quickly we could be on hand in an emergency. Such artifices are frequently resorted to by officers when either they or their commands, or both, are green. At first we pitched our tents on a level tract of land outside and near the town, but it being considered by Dr. Brace too flat to be healthy, we moved soon afterwards to a rise
to the rear. This looked as if we had come to stay. We did not then know that Grant had determined to force the enemy's lines in this position at whatever cost. We feel sure, however, that our escape from casualties of any kind, in the brief but terrible storm of missiles soon after hurled in this direction, was mainly due to the care we had bestowed on our defences, which faithfully shielded us and enabled us to work with greater efficiency against the enemy. By 1 o'clock, A. M. of the 3d our preparations were complete, and although the rain was pattering in fitful showers, we lay down to get a little rest before the tumult of battle the morning had in store should be inaugurated. Day came at last, but somewhat cloudy and foggy. Our corps occupied the left of the Union Our Second position at Cold Harbor, 1896 line, with Gibbon on the right, Barlow on the left, and Birney in reserve. We were located in Gibbon's line. A few minutes after the time specified for the attack
ght of bloodshed and disaster in which we were destined to be swept to the front of the tempest. Several trains, loaded with Rebel prisoners taken in the battle, passed along at intervals. Many of these men were quite talkative and discussed the situation very freely and pleasantly; while others, who evidently took matters less philosophically, were sullen, and either said nothing when addressed or growled in monosyllables. We gave them only kind words, however. On the morning of the 5th, Gen. French caused a spy, bearing the name of Richardson, to be hung at Frederick, and for example's sake allowed his body to remain hanging to the tree all day. The Eighth, Forty-sixth and Fifty-first Massachusetts, and the Seventh New York regiments arrived at the Junction on the 6th, and two sections of the Battery (the right and centre) were sent up to the city to do provost duty, with strict orders for all ragged and patched pantaloons to be doffed, and nothing but the best worn. Sc
sent with him. General Humphreys' Official Report. and was only another reaching out around the Confederate right, in the direction of the Southside Railroad, which, if we beat the enemy, we should advance upon. By mid-afternoon we halted, and were ordered into position; but let Lieut. Adams' report to the Adjutant-General give one view of the story: Lieut. Adams was now in command of the Battery, Major Sleeper being away on leave of absence. I have the honor to report that on the 5th inst., at 6 A. M., I reported with the Battery to Brig. Gen. Smythe, commanding Second Division, Second Army Corps, and marched with that division on the Vaughan Road to near Hatcher's Run, and went into position; the Right Section, commanded by Lieut. Day, near the Tucker House, the Left Section, commanded by Lieut. Green, near young Armstrong's ,house, covering the front and right of Gen. Smythe's Division; and the Centre Section, commanded by First Sergeant Townsend, under my own immediate s
ile others, who evidently took matters less philosophically, were sullen, and either said nothing when addressed or growled in monosyllables. We gave them only kind words, however. On the morning of the 5th, Gen. French caused a spy, bearing the name of Richardson, to be hung at Frederick, and for example's sake allowed his body to remain hanging to the tree all day. The Eighth, Forty-sixth and Fifty-first Massachusetts, and the Seventh New York regiments arrived at the Junction on the 6th, and two sections of the Battery (the right and centre) were sent up to the city to do provost duty, with strict orders for all ragged and patched pantaloons to be doffed, and nothing but the best worn. Scales and boots were to be brightly polished and kept so. All of which was done. But when the old soldiers of Potomac's ZZZa rivar passed the men as they stood on duty, and such expressions as Bandbox Battery and other derogatory remarks on their gay appearance reached the ear, the blood of
ated by Kearny and perfected by Hooker, continued, substantially unaltered, to the close of the war. The system of headquarters' flags, inaugurated by McClellan, was also much simplified and improved by Hooker. The accompanying plate shows the badges of the first four corps and the artillery brigade of the Third Corps. Our camp duties at Sulphur Springs were by no means onerous, especially during August. Once established, there was very little drill or fatigue duty required of us. On the 6th a national Thanksgiving was proclaimed by President Lincoln, in recognition of the victories at Gettysburg and Vicksburg, and our gratitude took on a deeper tinge on account of the appearance of the paymaster with two months pay. On the 15th, the gentlemanly soldier, Capt. Geo. E. Randolph, Chief of Artillery of the Third Corps, and commander of Battery E, First Regiment Rhode Island Artillery, inspected the Company. His bearing on this occasion, and afterwards whenever we came in contact wi
rom Warrenton Junction. November 1st the Battery was again inspected by Capt. Sleeper, and the location of our camp slightly changed. Our stay here was otherwise uneventful, and continued until the 6th, when, at evening, orders came to strap sacks of grain upon the caissons. This, in our experience, plainly portended a move, although some had thought no further movement probable, owing to the lateness of the season. But all surmises were now at an end on this head, and at 3.30 A. M. of the 7th we were aroused by the familiar notes of the reveille, and a more ill-natured set of men never tumbled out in the darkness to perform the duties which striking camp necessarily devolved upon them. Batterymen, to be studied in their most favorable aspects, should never be seen at so early an hour nor under such inauspicious circumstances. In the darkness ensued a scene difficult to describe, but perfectly familiar to artillerymen. Soon huge bonfires were lighted, and in their glare men were
ught beyond the stream, two miles away from Gen. Humphreys' troops, With Gen. Sheridan in Lee's Last Campaign.) a short, sharp contest gave us thirteen flags, three guns, several hundred prisoners, over two hundred wagons with their contents, and about seventy ambulances. The whole result of the day's work, to the corps, was 13 flags, 4 guns, 1,700 prisoners, and over 300 wagons. Gen. Humphreys: Official Report of Operations, We camped near this place for the night and at 6.30 A. M. of the 7th moved down a long and quite steep hill to the creek, near whose banks stood the wagons already mentioned; and picketed near—they did not need this precaution—was a collection of the skinniest and boniest mules we ever set eyes upon; which, we believe, could not, in tandem, have pulled one wagon up the steep ascent opposite, much less the two hundred. The wagons, though now under guard, had been pretty thoroughly inspected. The ground was strewn with clothing, good, bad, and indifferent, but
had given Lee the choice of surrendering or receiving the shock of the whole Union army. The actual correspondence in relation to the surrender was, in brief, as follows: At Farmville, the 7th, Grant wrote, asking the surrender of Lee's army. The same night Lee wrote asking the terms of surrender. To this Grant immediately replied, stating generally the terms, and proposing to designate officers to meet Rebel officers named by Lee, to arrange definite terms of surrender. On the 8th, still flying as he wrote, Lee sent a note, stating that he did not think the emergency had arisen to call for the surrender of his army but was ready to consider proposals tending to a restoration of peace, and appointed a meeting with Grant to that end. Grant answered this on the morning of April 9th, stating that lie had no authority to treat on the subject of peace, but that the South would hasten the end by laying down their arms, and closed by hoping that all our difficulties may be
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