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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion. Search the whole document.

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George E. Randolph (search for this): chapter 10
Warren's Second Corps had been engaged, and parked near their hospitals. In these lay many men dead or wounded. Among the former was Lieut. Col. Hesser, of the Seventy-second Pennsylvania Regiment, shot through the head. While we lay here, Capt. Randolph dispatched an aid to Gen. French to inquire whether he would like more artillery, to which answer was sent that he already had more than he could get into action. It seems he took the wrong road from the ford, and had fallen in with a part ned silent, ominously silent, evidently reserving their strength to repel the charge usually succeeding such heavy cannonading. In less than an hour the firing ceased, and we were ordered to change our guns to a position at our left, vacated by Randolph's Battery, whose shells did not reach. Skirmishing continued with rattling sound along our front, and dead and wounded were occasionally brought to the rear. Among the former was Lieut. Col. Tripp (?) of Berdan's Sharpshooters. The rest of th
Charles E. Prince (search for this): chapter 10
unction with the Second at the Tavern, thus placing the whole army in close communication on the two parallel roads. Meade had calculated that as the distance was but about twenty miles, by taking an early start on the 26th each corps commander would appear at the post assigned him at the latest by noon of the 27th. But the Third Corps, having somewhat farther to march than the others, did not reach the river until three hours after the arrival of the other corps, through the mistake of Gen. Prince, one of its division commanders, who took the wrong road. This made a delay, as Gen. Meade, not sure how much opposition he should meet, wished all the corps to cross at the same time. A second serious contingency was the miscalculation on the part of the engineers, who underestimated the width of the river, causing a delay while they pieced out the pontoon bridges. The steepness of the banks was a third obstacle. These hindrances, already alluded to, conspired to bring ultimate failu
nemy beyond skirmishing. They remained silent, ominously silent, evidently reserving their strength to repel the charge usually succeeding such heavy cannonading. In less than an hour the firing ceased, and we were ordered to change our guns to a position at our left, vacated by Randolph's Battery, whose shells did not reach. Skirmishing continued with rattling sound along our front, and dead and wounded were occasionally brought to the rear. Among the former was Lieut. Col. Tripp (?) of Berdan's Sharpshooters. The rest of the day wore away with no other events worthy of record except the holding of a council of war by Gen. Meade in the little house near us, of whose doings we were not apprised. Another night, cold and blustering, ensued, succeeded by a morning of like description, when we woke to find the water in the canteens completely frozen. We called it the coldest night we had passed in the open air thus far. Later in the forenoon there were desultory sounds of fighting b
Joshua T. Reed (search for this): chapter 10
d to the heights of Fredericksburg to camp for the winter, but was again negatived in the project by Halleck. Morning reports. 1863. Nov. 12. Serg't G. F. Gould and privates H. Newton, Charles Slack, T. Ellworth, reported to quarters. Bugler Reed at hospital. Nov. 13. Privates Charles Slack, Thomas Ellworth, Hiram Warburton reported for duty. Nov. 14. Private H. Newton and Serg't Gould (?) reported for duty. Nov. 15. Five horses unserviceable. Three horses shot by order of Drrses condemned and turned over to Capt. L. H. Pierce A. Q. Seven horses received from Capt. Pierce. Privates Maxwell and MacAllister report for duty. W. H. Fitzpatrick started tonight on a ten days leave of absence to Boston. Nov. 22. Bugler Joshua T. Reed went to Washington Hospital. Nov. 24. Daniel MacAllister and Wm. G. Donnelly reported to quarters. Orders to move which were countermanded. Nov. 25. Alex. W. Holbrook reported to quarters. Nov. 26. Left Brandy Station for Germa
Hiram P. Ring (search for this): chapter 10
the time one was fairly awake; and this programme was repeated for hours after dark. Our stops were of insufficient duration, either to cook a pot of coffee or steal a halfhour's nap, although intensely aggravated by the need of both. The weather, too, had grown quite cool and frosty. The woods were aglow with the fires lighted by the troops that had preceded us, to keep them comfortable while awaiting their turn to cross; and in alternately shivering and dozing Alonzo N. Merrill Hiram P. Ring around these and sluggishly marching a few rods at a time, the hours wore drearily away until midnight, when we ascertained that since 6 o'clock we had traversed a distance of two miles. At this time the column came to a halt, which seemed likely to continue some time; at least we resolved to take our risks of its thus continuing; and the cannoneers at once bestirred themselves to light fires and procure water, which luckily flowed front a spring near at hand; while the drivers hasten
., where he began skirmishing with the enemy, but dared not make a serious attack until joined by the Third Corps. But, unfortunately, this body was doomed to be a further stumbling-block, for after crossing the river, Gen. French took the wrong road, which, carrying him too far to the right, involved him in serious trouble with Johnson's Division of Ewell's Corps, and by the time he had finished the brush the afternoon was far spent and the golden opportunity had passed. According to Mr. Greeley, he seems to have played at cross purposes with the implicit commands of his superior. See American Conflict, p. 400, Vol. II. Hill's Corps now coming up, the Rebel army fell back and took position along the left bank of Mine Run. Little remains to be said not already given. On the 28th Warren was sent to find the enemy's right, and, if he deemed it feasible, to flank and turn it. He completed his observations on the 29th, and reported the situation favorable for an attack. At the sa
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 10
fe rear, among the Coffee Coolers and Company Q, that the most marvellous accounts of battles and authentic reports of movements are concocted. Now, Lee is all but surrounded, and we are waiting for the cavalry to cut his only remaining line of communication, when a general attack is to take place. Now he has taken an almost impregnable position which it will cost half our army to carry. One man knows that the Rebel army is but half ours in number, while another is equally positive that Longstreet's corps arrived from East Tennessee during the night, thus making them a match for us. So, as the cold increases, we gather closer about our fires, receive, discuss, and dispatch the rumors as they come in, and await the course of events. In the afternoon more definite information came to hand. Gen. Warren's corps had gone around to the enemy's right flank, and was expected to attack at once. Simultaneously with this assault a charge was to be made in our front by the First, Third, an
response from the enemy beyond skirmishing. They remained silent, ominously silent, evidently reserving their strength to repel the charge usually succeeding such heavy cannonading. In less than an hour the firing ceased, and we were ordered to change our guns to a position at our left, vacated by Randolph's Battery, whose shells did not reach. Skirmishing continued with rattling sound along our front, and dead and wounded were occasionally brought to the rear. Among the former was Lieut. Col. Tripp (?) of Berdan's Sharpshooters. The rest of the day wore away with no other events worthy of record except the holding of a council of war by Gen. Meade in the little house near us, of whose doings we were not apprised. Another night, cold and blustering, ensued, succeeded by a morning of like description, when we woke to find the water in the canteens completely frozen. We called it the coldest night we had passed in the open air thus far. Later in the forenoon there were desultory
Gouverneur K. Warren (search for this): chapter 10
dvance to cross. We afterwards learned that Warren's Second Corps, which crossed at this ford, waobertson's Tavern, in whose vicinity a part of Warren's Second Corps had been engaged, and parked never to the tavern, where he was to have joined Warren. With this body of the enemy he had been engaon more definite information came to hand. Gen. Warren's corps had gone around to the enemy's righ. Our signal to begin was to be the booing of Warren's guns. The lines of assault were drawn up; baining the strength or position of the enemy. Warren had evidently found some insuperable obstacle,isions of our corps that had been sent to aid Warren in his anticipated attack on the enemy's righteade, pressed forward with greater rapidity. Warren reached Robertson's Tavern about 1 o'clock P. ins to be said not already given. On the 28th Warren was sent to find the enemy's right, and, if heess to think of an assault upon it. So thought Warren, who was considered a skilful engineer; so tho
longer pause to analyze our feelings. Suffice it, if, from any or all considerations, we can hold ourselves resolutely to the promised work of the hour. We were spared the ordeal of battle this time, however. After travelling in woods some distance, we emerged on the Orange Turnpike, two miles east of Robertson's Tavern, in whose vicinity a part of Warren's Second Corps had been engaged, and parked near their hospitals. In these lay many men dead or wounded. Among the former was Lieut. Col. Hesser, of the Seventy-second Pennsylvania Regiment, shot through the head. While we lay here, Capt. Randolph dispatched an aid to Gen. French to inquire whether he would like more artillery, to which answer was sent that he already had more than he could get into action. It seems he took the wrong road from the ford, and had fallen in with a part of Ewell's corps before he had spanned half the distance from the river to the tavern, where he was to have joined Warren. With this body of th
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