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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
and Company Q, that the most marvellous accounts of battles and authentic reports of movements are concocted. Now, Lee is all but surrounded, and we are waiting for the cavalry to cut his only remaining line of communication, when a general attack is to take place. Now he has taken an almost impregnable position which it will cost half our army to carry. One man knows that the Rebel army is but half ours in number, while another is equally positive that Longstreet's corps arrived from East Tennessee during the night, thus making them a match for us. So, as the cold increases, we gather closer about our fires, receive, discuss, and dispatch the rumors as they come in, and await the course of events. In the afternoon more definite information came to hand. Gen. Warren's corps had gone around to the enemy's right flank, and was expected to attack at once. Simultaneously with this assault a charge was to be made in our front by the First, Third, and Sixth corps, under cover of a he
Mine Run (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ign. November 11 to December 3, 1863. A mud march delays across the Rapidan Robertson's Tavern in line at Mine Run a Cold Snap rumors the expected as Sault the return to Brandy Station a brief synopsis of the Campaign. Having gh the mire, and at last emerge from the woods upon a ridge which falls away gently before us to a small stream known as Mine Run. The rain had ceased falling before mid-afternoon, and a cold wind, starting up from the westward, had cleared the face to orders, the artillery on my line opened on the enemy, and I ordered my infantry to advance. We crossed the creek of Mine Run and took the first line of rifle-pits of the enemy. The enemy were in great commotion. I think that in extending theironflict, p. 400, Vol. II. Hill's Corps now coming up, the Rebel army fell back and took position along the left bank of Mine Run. Little remains to be said not already given. On the 28th Warren was sent to find the enemy's right, and, if he deemed
Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
tingencies being unprovided for. But unfortunately, as it often happens, contingencies did arise which wrecked the success of the movement. He had ascertained that Lee had left the lower fords of the Rapidan uncovered; that his two corps were widely scattered in winterquar-ters,—Ewell's Corps extending from Morton's Ford across the country to the vicinity of Orange Court House, and Hill's distributed from south of that point along the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to the neighborhood of Charlottesville. Some miles intervened between these corps. Meade's plan was to cross at the uncovered fords and advance by the Orange plank and Orange turnpike roads, which are intersected by roads from Ely's, Jacobs Mill, Germania and Culpepper Mine fords, to Orange Court House, thus placing his army between the corps of the enemy, which he hoped to destroy in detail. It was a bold stroke, necessitating a cutting loose from his base of supplies, and a nice execution of all the details of the move
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
hoped so much end without success, but any further move looking to a dislodgment of Lee would entail a still further advance into the enemy's country; and this, with our supply trains across the river, and the rations of the army now nearly exhausted, was not to be thought of in the hostile month of December. He therefore decided to sacrifice himself, if necessary, rather than continue operations longer, and issued the orders for withdrawal. He would now have marched to the heights of Fredericksburg to camp for the winter, but was again negatived in the project by Halleck. Morning reports. 1863. Nov. 12. Serg't G. F. Gould and privates H. Newton, Charles Slack, T. Ellworth, reported to quarters. Bugler Reed at hospital. Nov. 13. Privates Charles Slack, Thomas Ellworth, Hiram Warburton reported for duty. Nov. 14. Private H. Newton and Serg't Gould (?) reported for duty. Nov. 15. Five horses unserviceable. Three horses shot by order of Dr. Benson Third Corps Headqua
Richardsville (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ow can one do otherwise than admire a devotion to a cause, so intense as to endure these two hardships of scanty fare and exposure! We must pay this tribute to Rebel patriotism even while we disapprove of and condemn the convictions which prompted it. Leaving the pike we turn to our left into the woods, which form a part of the region appropriately termed the Wilderness. Here we halt for a short time, awaiting a supply of rations from the train, which was parked across the river at Richardsville, under the protection of our cavalry. Having obtained these we plunge on again through the mire, and at last emerge from the woods upon a ridge which falls away gently before us to a small stream known as Mine Run. The rain had ceased falling before mid-afternoon, and a cold wind, starting up from the westward, had cleared the face of the heavens, so that the stars now shone brightly above us. When night fairly obscured our movements from the enemy we put our guns into position, having
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
on's Tavern in line at Mine Run a Cold Snap rumors the expected as Sault the return to Brandy Station a brief synopsis of the Campaign. Having once become fairly located in camp, we began tolumn, in the unmistakable staccato of our Captain, and we are on the move. We marched past Brandy Station, our depot of supplies, and crossing the railroad moved by rather slow stages over a flat coe sacred soil could produce. It was the territory that lay between us and our old camp near Brandy Station, which we had now learned was our destination. Never did wayworn travellers returning from Ford about 5 o'clock and halted. About 10 moved on and marched until within four miles of Brandy Station and stopped for the night. Dec. 3. At daylight marched to our old camp ground at Brandy ntil within four miles of Brandy Station and stopped for the night. Dec. 3. At daylight marched to our old camp ground at Brandy Station. Arrived there about 9.30 A. M. Ten horses unserviceable.
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ticable on the opposite bank for artillery, or wagons, or even empty ambulances. In fact it was almost impossible for a horseman to go up on the opposite side of the river without dismounting. The Third Corps, on reaching the river, had to send all the artillery and ambulances to the Germania Ford.— Gen. Birney: Testimony before the Committee on the Conduct of the War. During this day's march Gen. Meade caused a despatch to be read announcing Grant's great victories at Chattanooga and Lookout Mountain, and stating that he had taken 20,000 prisoners. This, by the by, is a good specimen of such despatches. The actual number officially reported by Grant was 6,142. But we were destined to move on and cross the river at Germania Ford, a few miles lower down, and being now in the rear, partly through loss of time in the mire, and partly from misdirection, we were condemned to the misery of waiting for those in advance to cross. We afterwards learned that Warren's Second Corps, which
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s of the movement. He had ascertained that Lee had left the lower fords of the Rapidan uncovered; that his two corps were widely scattered in winterquar-ters,—Ewell's Corps extending from Morton's Ford across the country to the vicinity of Orange Court House, and Hill's distributed from south of that point along the Orange & Alexandria Railroad to the neighborhood of Charlottesville. Some miles intervened between these corps. Meade's plan was to cross at the uncovered fords and advance by the Orange plank and Orange turnpike roads, which are intersected by roads from Ely's, Jacobs Mill, Germania and Culpepper Mine fords, to Orange Court House, thus placing his army between the corps of the enemy, which he hoped to destroy in detail. It was a bold stroke, necessitating a cutting loose from his base of supplies, and a nice execution of all the details of the movement planned, at the time and in the manner for which they were planned. The Fifth Corps, followed by the First, was to c
G. F. Gould (search for this): chapter 10
er than continue operations longer, and issued the orders for withdrawal. He would now have marched to the heights of Fredericksburg to camp for the winter, but was again negatived in the project by Halleck. Morning reports. 1863. Nov. 12. Serg't G. F. Gould and privates H. Newton, Charles Slack, T. Ellworth, reported to quarters. Bugler Reed at hospital. Nov. 13. Privates Charles Slack, Thomas Ellworth, Hiram Warburton reported for duty. Nov. 14. Private H. Newton and Serg't Gould (?) reported for duty. Nov. 15. Five horses unserviceable. Three horses shot by order of Dr. Benson Third Corps Headquarters. Nov. 16. Received 8 horses from Capt. A H. Pierce, Warrenton Junction, Va. Nov. 17. One horse died, one horse condemned and shot, by order Inspector General. Nov. 18. Corporal Currant and privates McAllister, Maxwell and Colbath, reported to quarters. Nov. 19. Corporal Currant and Private Colbath report for duty. Nov. 20. Ten horses condemned and
Henry L. Ewell (search for this): chapter 10
h dispatched an aid to Gen. French to inquire whether he would like more artillery, to which answer was sent that he already had more than he could get into action. It seems he took the wrong road from the ford, and had fallen in with a part of Ewell's corps before he had spanned half the distance from the river to the tavern, where he was to have joined Warren. With this body of the enemy he had been engaged during the afternoon, but they had now fallen back before him. This failure on the Corps. But, unfortunately, this body was doomed to be a further stumbling-block, for after crossing the river, Gen. French took the wrong road, which, carrying him too far to the right, involved him in serious trouble with Johnson's Division of Ewell's Corps, and by the time he had finished the brush the afternoon was far spent and the golden opportunity had passed. According to Mr. Greeley, he seems to have played at cross purposes with the implicit commands of his superior. See American
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