hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Winfield S. Hancock 225 3 Browse Search
June 9th, 1865 AD 193 193 Browse Search
Geo Meade 155 1 Browse Search
September 9th, 1862 AD 154 154 Browse Search
James Lee 150 2 Browse Search
Jacob Henry Sleeper 102 28 Browse Search
Gouverneur K. Warren 90 2 Browse Search
Grant 78 18 Browse Search
John Gibbon 70 2 Browse Search
Marblehead (Massachusetts, United States) 70 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion. Search the whole document.

Found 395 total hits in 150 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
d me in July, when operating from Deep Bottom. These were, in brief, a demonstration in force against the enemy's left. Gregg's division of cavalry and Birney's Tenth Corps were placed at Hancock's disposal. The movement was intended to be a surprise, but failed as such. It was expected to land troops at various points on the river by means of temporary landing-places, but it was a failure, and the troops were not finally disembarked at Deep Bottom until 9 o'clock on the morning of the 13th,—an inauspicious delay. The column finally advanced, but gained only temporary advantages. Birney's men captured four howitzers. The report continues: On the night of the 16th, a fleet of steamers was sent from City Point to Deep Bottom, returning at 4 o'clock A. M. on the 17th, the object being to convey the impression to the enemy that we were withdrawing from Deep Bottom, and to induce them to come out of their works and attack. The ruse failed. At 8 o'clock P. M., Gen. Mott w
laced at Hancock's disposal. The movement was intended to be a surprise, but failed as such. It was expected to land troops at various points on the river by means of temporary landing-places, but it was a failure, and the troops were not finally disembarked at Deep Bottom until 9 o'clock on the morning of the 13th,—an inauspicious delay. The column finally advanced, but gained only temporary advantages. Birney's men captured four howitzers. The report continues: On the night of the 16th, a fleet of steamers was sent from City Point to Deep Bottom, returning at 4 o'clock A. M. on the 17th, the object being to convey the impression to the enemy that we were withdrawing from Deep Bottom, and to induce them to come out of their works and attack. The ruse failed. At 8 o'clock P. M., Gen. Mott was ordered to Petersburg to relieve the Ninth Corps from the intrenchments. Immediately after dark (20th), I withdrew my command, in accordance with orders, . . . . and marched my t
xpected to land troops at various points on the river by means of temporary landing-places, but it was a failure, and the troops were not finally disembarked at Deep Bottom until 9 o'clock on the morning of the 13th,—an inauspicious delay. The column finally advanced, but gained only temporary advantages. Birney's men captured four howitzers. The report continues: On the night of the 16th, a fleet of steamers was sent from City Point to Deep Bottom, returning at 4 o'clock A. M. on the 17th, the object being to convey the impression to the enemy that we were withdrawing from Deep Bottom, and to induce them to come out of their works and attack. The ruse failed. At 8 o'clock P. M., Gen. Mott was ordered to Petersburg to relieve the Ninth Corps from the intrenchments. Immediately after dark (20th), I withdrew my command, in accordance with orders, . . . . and marched my two divisions by Point of Rocks to my old camp near Petersburg. . . . . The night was extremely inclemen
fore Petersburg had been so strengthened that a small portion of the entire force was sufficient to hold it. This left the remainder free to maneuver elsewhere. We were drawn out of the front line, then, because we were wanted elsewhere. On the 21st the Second and Sixth corps were dispatched to the left to extend the line towards the Weldon Railroad, with a view of enveloping the city more closely. The Second Corps having the advance, struck the Plank Road, and established itself on the west my two divisions by Point of Rocks to my old camp near Petersburg. . . . . The night was extremely inclement, and the roads were in exceedingly bad condition, but my command arrived at camp in very good order between 6 and 7 o'clock A. M., on the 21st. This camp was noted as near the Deserted House. The behavior of some of the troops under Barlow is commented upon unfavorably for their lack of steadiness, and Hancock attributes their lack of cohesion to the large number of new men in the
Mott's division had been ordered to report to Gen. Ord, the day before. Barge's brigade of the Tenth Corps, This corps was now commanded by Gen. Birney, who had been promoted from the Second to that position, July 11. and Sheridan's cavalry. Having attracted to my front so large a portion of Lee's army, Lieut. Gen. Grant thought it a favorable time to assault at Petersburg, and I was therefore instructed to proceed to that place with the remainder of my command. Soon after dark on the 29th, . . . . I withdrew the entire command from Deep Bottom, and reported . . . . at Petersburg, on the morning of the 30th, in time to witness the explosion of the Mine. The casualties of the corps in this movement were 192. Of these, 57 were missing. As we drew near Petersburg in the gray of morning, the rumbling sound of cannonading was perceptible. While recrossing the pontoon, D. W. Atkinson, a cannoneer, falling asleep walked off the bridge, providentially alighting in one of the
rps was now commanded by Gen. Birney, who had been promoted from the Second to that position, July 11. and Sheridan's cavalry. Having attracted to my front so large a portion of Lee's army, Lieut. Gen. Grant thought it a favorable time to assault at Petersburg, and I was therefore instructed to proceed to that place with the remainder of my command. Soon after dark on the 29th, . . . . I withdrew the entire command from Deep Bottom, and reported . . . . at Petersburg, on the morning of the 30th, in time to witness the explosion of the Mine. The casualties of the corps in this movement were 192. Of these, 57 were missing. As we drew near Petersburg in the gray of morning, the rumbling sound of cannonading was perceptible. While recrossing the pontoon, D. W. Atkinson, a cannoneer, falling asleep walked off the bridge, providentially alighting in one of the boats. When we reached the Eighteenth Corps hospitals, on the City Point Railroad, distant two miles from the main line
Chapter 14: June 20-Aug. 2s, 1864. To the rear boot and saddle the Corps badly used on the Jerusalem Plank Road a dry time—where we dug the First well he Sanitary Commission by the right flank Deep Bottom rain at last the Weldon Railroad. It is a well-known fact, that, inasmuch as the artillery of the army was abundant, and the opportunities to use it all had been limited, there were several batteries which had scarcely been called into action during the campaign, unless for siege duty at Cold Harbor, having been kept with the reserve artillery. As the Tenth Massachusetts had not been of that number, it was not unlikely, so we reasoned, that we were now to lie off awhile, rest the horses and men, and give some one else a chance; and it was in this expectation that, having joined the Artillery Brigade on the following afternoon (Monday, June 21), we went somewhat to the rear and parked, in spacious order, in a large field skirted with woods. But we were doome
t number, it was not unlikely, so we reasoned, that we were now to lie off awhile, rest the horses and men, and give some one else a chance; and it was in this expectation that, having joined the Artillery Brigade on the following afternoon (Monday, June 21), we went somewhat to the rear and parked, in spacious order, in a large field skirted with woods. But we were doomed to disappointment. There was other business on hand. Scarcely were the harnesses off the horses ere boot and saddle souned book till, leaf by leaf, it becomes the present, for some of the voices that rang out clear and cheerful in the gloom of that Monday evening were hushed, ere the week was closed, in the solemn stillness of death. Morning reports. 1864. June 21. Two horses shot by order Capt. Sleeper —glanders. One horse died—exhaustion. June 23. One horse shot, farcy; one horse died—exhaustion. Corp. Paine and Thomas Ellworth sent to hospital. June 26. Two horses died,—exhaustion. June 27.
how philosophical the martyrs were who sang while enduring tortures at the stake. But that is an all-wise provision of Providence which keeps the future a sealed book till, leaf by leaf, it becomes the present, for some of the voices that rang out clear and cheerful in the gloom of that Monday evening were hushed, ere the week was closed, in the solemn stillness of death. Morning reports. 1864. June 21. Two horses shot by order Capt. Sleeper —glanders. One horse died—exhaustion. June 23. One horse shot, farcy; one horse died—exhaustion. Corp. Paine and Thomas Ellworth sent to hospital. June 26. Two horses died,—exhaustion. June 27. Private Newton, Killoran and Corp'l Smith missing. Corp'l Smith returned. June 29. Fifteen horses drawn from Capt. Cochrane; eight transferred to Capt. Strang. June 30. Private Killoran returned; private Judson Stevens sent to hospital. July 1. Eleven enlisted men with caissons in Ammunition Train heretofore counted as detached
ion of Providence which keeps the future a sealed book till, leaf by leaf, it becomes the present, for some of the voices that rang out clear and cheerful in the gloom of that Monday evening were hushed, ere the week was closed, in the solemn stillness of death. Morning reports. 1864. June 21. Two horses shot by order Capt. Sleeper —glanders. One horse died—exhaustion. June 23. One horse shot, farcy; one horse died—exhaustion. Corp. Paine and Thomas Ellworth sent to hospital. June 26. Two horses died,—exhaustion. June 27. Private Newton, Killoran and Corp'l Smith missing. Corp'l Smith returned. June 29. Fifteen horses drawn from Capt. Cochrane; eight transferred to Capt. Strang. June 30. Private Killoran returned; private Judson Stevens sent to hospital. July 1. Eleven enlisted men with caissons in Ammunition Train heretofore counted as detached returned as present for duty. J. H. Knowland excused from duty. July 2. Corp. Smith, Privates A. W. Holbrook
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...