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he bottom of the river, the prow of the ram still clinging to her, and exciting for a few moments serious apprehensions for the safety of the Albemarle. The vessel soon worked herself free and followed the other retreating gunboats. Maffitt thinks that this brilliant naval success insured the triumph of General Hoke, for it gave him, on the water side, a vulnerable point of attack. General Hoke had invested the town with his own brigade, the brigade of Ransom, and one of Pickett's under Terry. When Cooke returned, his ship opened fire with its two guns upon Fort Williams, the citadel of Plymouth. General Hoke moved General Ransom's brigade around to attack from the river side. Ransom's men gallantly stormed the works, meeting not only the usual artillery and infantry fire, but encountering hand-grenades thrown from the works. On all sides the Confederate forces closed in, and, after a struggle in which both sides fought as only seasoned soldiers are apt to fight, the town wit
Ironmonger (search for this): chapter 14
. This tribute to Cooke is a just one. No boat could have been built under more difficulties than was the Albemarle, as Cooke named his new venture, and its construction shows the difficulties under which the Confederates waged a long war. It was designed by Gilbert Elliott. The prow, which was used as a ram, was of oak sheathed with iron; its back was turtle-shaped and protected by 2-inch iron. Cooke had ransacked the whole country for iron, until, says Maffitt, he was known as the Ironmonger captain. The entire construction, continues Maffitt, was one of shreds and patches; the engine was adapted from incongruous material, ingeniously dovetailed and put together with a determined will that mastered doubt, but not without some natural anxiety as to derangements that might occur from so heterogeneous a combination. The Albemarle was built in an open cornfield, of unseasoned timber. A simple blacksmith shop aided the mechanical part of her construction. Notwithstanding the
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 14
atrick give up his last chance of accomplishing his mission, was composed of a small band of North Carolina cavalry. General Hampton learned from citizens that a cavalry force was heading for the Central railroad, and he reports: As soon as I could olonel Cheek), and 53 from the Second (Major Andrews), with Hart's battery to Mount Carmel church. The next morning General Hampton joined the command and moved down to strike the enemy. At Atlee's station, about midnight, General Hampton sent ColGeneral Hampton sent Colonel Cheek to see what force the enemy had. Colonel Cheek took 200 of his regiment and 30 of the Second. He found Sawyer's brigade lying down, many of them asleep. Bringing a section of artillery, he endeavored to get the pieces in position, but , Cheek charged with his mounted men. The result was that the brigade was badly broken and driven on the main body. General Hampton reports: Kilpatrick immediately moved his division off at a gallop, leaving one of his wagons with horses hitched to
artin's brigade—the Seventeenth North Carolina, Colonel Martin; Forty-second North Carolina, Colonel Brown; Fiftieth North Carolina, Colonel Wortham; Sixty-sixth, Colonel Moore. He had 2,326 heavy artillerymen, 374 light artillerymen, and about 500 cavalrymen. The total force then stationed in the State was 19,998. Acting under General Lee's orders, General Pickett, on the 20th of January, set three columns in motion from Kinston to attack New Bern. General Barton with his own brigade, Kemper's brigade, part of Ransom's brigade, twelve pieces of artillery, and twelve companies of cavalry, was directed to cress the Trent and take the works of New Bern in reverse, and to prevent reinforcements reaching the town. Colonel Dearing was sent with a cavalry force to attack Fort Anderson, Barrington's ferry. General Pickett, with Hoke's brigade, three regiments of Corse's brigade, the Eighth and Fifty-first regiments of Clingman's brigade, and ten pieces of artillery, advanced on New Be
R. F. Hoke (search for this): chapter 14
the State Ransom Recovers Suffolk victory of Hoke and Cooke at Plymouth gallant fighting of the l McKethan, and Sixty-first, Colonel Radcliffe; Hoke's Carolina brigade—Sixth, Colonel Webb; Twenty-go in the town. Following out this plan, General Hoke, after a brisk skirmish on Monday, Februaryssells, commanding a garrison of 2,834 men. General Hoke, who had been selected to lead this importae time suggested by General Hoke. But when General Hoke explained that he wanted to attack Plymouthat to Plymouth, finished or unfinished, and General Hoke left him with that assurance. On the day slliant naval success insured the triumph of General Hoke, for it gave him, on the water side, a vulnon Fort Williams, the citadel of Plymouth. General Hoke moved General Ransom's brigade around to atederate Congress passed a vote of thanks to General Hoke and Commander James W. Cooke and the officeour. Rebellion Record, XXXIII, p. 310. General Hoke next moved against New Bern, and Roman says[6 more...]
The force that brought about this commotion on that dark, sleety night, and made Kilpatrick give up his last chance of accomplishing his mission, was composed of a small band of North Carolina cavalry. General Hampton learned from citizens that a cavalry force was heading for the Central railroad, and he reports: As soon as I could learn what direction the enemy had taken, I sent all the mounted men from the North Carolina cavalry (Colonel Cheek), and 53 from the Second (Major Andrews), with Hart's battery to Mount Carmel church. The next morning General Hampton joined the command and moved down to strike the enemy. At Atlee's station, about midnight, General Hampton sent Colonel Cheek to see what force the enemy had. Colonel Cheek took 200 of his regiment and 30 of the Second. He found Sawyer's brigade lying down, many of them asleep. Bringing a section of artillery, he endeavored to get the pieces in position, but one mired so that it was useless. Then dismounting 150 men unde
aigns. Frequent expeditions were sent out from New Bern by the Federals. These were frequently fired upon by the militia, but, as the local troops were not regularly organized, the expeditions generally came and went without much molestation. Whitford's battalion was often active and useful in deterring such raids. On December 30th, near Greenville, there was a brisk skirmish between Colonel McChesney, commanding a Federal cavalry and artillery force, and Major Moore, with some companies of rst, Colonel Rankin; Forty-third, Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis; Fifty-fourth, Colonel Murchison; Fifty-seventh, Colonel Godwin, and Twenty-first Georgia. In addition, he had four unbrigaded regiments, including the Sixty-seventh North Carolina, Colonel Whitford, and five regiments of cavalry, including the Third North Carolina, Colonel Baker, and the Sixth, Colonel Folk. The artillery under Pickett's orders consisted of the Tenth North Carolina regiment, Colonel Pool's command, Starr's light artil
Kilpatrick (search for this): chapter 14
e attack of 306 North Carolina horsemen upon Kilpatrick's cavalry at Atlee's station near Richmond. On the 28th of February, General Kilpatrick was ordered by the Federal government to take 3,000 cavdamage as time and means would allow. General Kilpatrick, acting upon his orders, moved so rapidl disclosed. By a feigned attack at Ashland, Kilpatrick succeeded in throwing the Confederates off h Confederates were reinforcing in his front, Kilpatrick felt that an attack would end in a bloody faanicsville. However, from scouts and spies, Kilpatrick learned that night that the entire availableset out. Just, however, as they started, General Kilpatrick was informed by Colonel Sawyer, commandien in on the road from Hanover Court House. Kilpatrick's report continues: A few moments later he (mmotion on that dark, sleety night, and made Kilpatrick give up his last chance of accomplishing his on the main body. General Hampton reports: Kilpatrick immediately moved his division off at a gall
A. C. Godwin (search for this): chapter 14
Carolina regiments: Twenty-fourth, Colonel Clarke; Twenty-fifth, Colonel Rutledge; Thirty-fifth, Colonel Jones; Forty-ninth, Colonel McAfee, and Fifty-sixth, Colonel Faison; Clingman's North Carolina brigade—the Eighth, Colonel Shaw; Thirty-first, Colonel Jordan; Fifty-first, Colonel McKethan, and Sixty-first, Colonel Radcliffe; Hoke's Carolina brigade—Sixth, Colonel Webb; Twenty-first, Colonel Rankin; Forty-third, Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis; Fifty-fourth, Colonel Murchison; Fifty-seventh, Colonel Godwin, and Twenty-first Georgia. In addition, he had four unbrigaded regiments, including the Sixty-seventh North Carolina, Colonel Whitford, and five regiments of cavalry, including the Third North Carolina, Colonel Baker, and the Sixth, Colonel Folk. The artillery under Pickett's orders consisted of the Tenth North Carolina regiment, Colonel Pool's command, Starr's light artillery battalion, Robertson's heavy battery, all of North Carolina, and several batteries from other States. The fie
n effort to alleviate this state of affairs, a force of some magnitude was sent to North Carolina at the opening of 1864. Gen. George E. Pickett, with a division of troops, was sent to the State to co-operate with the forces already there. The dispersion or capture of the Federal garrison at New Bern seems to have been Pickett's objective. General Pickett had in his command Corse's Virginia brigade; Gen. M. W. Ransom's brigade, composed of these North Carolina regiments: Twenty-fourth, Colonel Clarke; Twenty-fifth, Colonel Rutledge; Thirty-fifth, Colonel Jones; Forty-ninth, Colonel McAfee, and Fifty-sixth, Colonel Faison; Clingman's North Carolina brigade—the Eighth, Colonel Shaw; Thirty-first, Colonel Jordan; Fifty-first, Colonel McKethan, and Sixty-first, Colonel Radcliffe; Hoke's Carolina brigade—Sixth, Colonel Webb; Twenty-first, Colonel Rankin; Forty-third, Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis; Fifty-fourth, Colonel Murchison; Fifty-seventh, Colonel Godwin, and Twenty-first Georgia. In add
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