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ng in all 143 guns, was commanded by Flag-Officer S. H. Stringham. these forces sailed for Hatteras inlet on the 26th of August and arrived off the inlet that afternoon. To resist this formidable expedition, the Confederates in the forts had eight companies of the Seventeenth North Carolina regiment, Col. W. F. Martin, and some detachments of the Tenth North Carolina artillery. The whole force on the first day of the engagement amounted to 580 Rebellion Records, IV, 574. men. On the second day the Ellis Scharf's History Confederate Navy. landed some reinforcements, raising the number to 718. The post was commanded by Maj. W. S. G. Andrews. These forces were divided between Fort Hatteras and Fort Clark, which were about three-quarters of a mile apart Fort Hatteras—the position of which was so good that the enemy's engineer officer said after its capture, With guns of long range it can successfully defend itself from any fleet—was a square redoubt with pan coups at all the
ing and arms a serious difficulty. The six weeks that intervened between Bethel and First Manassas were weeks of ceaseless activity. Regiments marched and countermarched; the voice of the drill-master was heard from hundreds of camps; quartermasters and commissary officers hurried from place to place in search of munitions and stores; North Carolina was hardly more than one big camp, quivering with excitement, bustling with energy, overflowing with patriotic ardor. Toward the middle of July expectant eyes were turned to Virginia. The Confederate army under Generals Johnston and Beauregard was throwing itself into position to stop the On to Richmond march of the Federal army under Gen. Irvin McDowell. Two armies vastly greater than had ever before fought on this continent, and the largest volunteer armies ever assembled since the era of standing armies Beauregard in Battles and Leaders. were approaching each other. Battle is always horrible, but this was most horrible in th
August 26th (search for this): chapter 3
itted out at Fortress Monroe a combined army and navy expedition for an attack on the two forts at Hatteras. The land forces, Rebellion Records, IV, 580 consisting of 800 infantry and 60 artillerymen, were commanded by Gen. B. F. Butler; the naval force, comprising the war vessels Wabash, Susquehanna, Pawnee, Monticello, Cumberland, Harriet Lane and transport ships, carrying in all 143 guns, was commanded by Flag-Officer S. H. Stringham. these forces sailed for Hatteras inlet on the 26th of August and arrived off the inlet that afternoon. To resist this formidable expedition, the Confederates in the forts had eight companies of the Seventeenth North Carolina regiment, Col. W. F. Martin, and some detachments of the Tenth North Carolina artillery. The whole force on the first day of the engagement amounted to 580 Rebellion Records, IV, 574. men. On the second day the Ellis Scharf's History Confederate Navy. landed some reinforcements, raising the number to 718. The post
September (search for this): chapter 3
oilers—when we recall all this, we hardly know whether most to admire their hardihood, or to grieve that so brave a people had to go to war with such a travesty on preparation. As the first winter of the war drew on, a serious question that confronted the State authorities was how to clothe and shoe the forty regiments in the field; for it was evident the Confederacy could not do it. Major Gordon gives this account of how it was done: The legislature directed General Martin, late in September, to provide winter clothing, shoes, etc., for the troops. The time was short and it was no small task, but he went about it with his usual energy. He organized a clothing factory in Raleigh, under Captain Garrett; every mill in the State was made to furnish every yard of cloth that was possible; Capt. A. Myers was sent through North Carolina, South Carolina and as far south as Savannah, purchasing everything that was available for clothing the troops. The ladies came nobly to their assi
October 1st (search for this): chapter 3
as our first naval victory—indeed, our first victory of any kind, and great was the rejoicing thereat throughout the United States. The Federals at once occupied this commanding position and made it the basis of future operations against this coast. With the exception of a skirmish at Chicamacomico this battle ended the offensive operations in 1861. After the capture of Hatteras the Twentieth Indiana regiment was moved up the beach to hold Chicamacomico, or Loggerhead inlet. On the 1st of October the Federal steamer Fanny with a large supply of ammunition and stores left Hatteras for the Indiana camp, but Col. A. R. Wright, of the Third Georgia regiment, stationed on Roanoke island, in conjunction with Commander Lynch, of the mosquito fleet, captured this vessel— the first capture of an armed vessel during the war. Encouraged by this success, Colonel Wright and Colonel Shaw, of the Eighth North Carolina, loading their troops on Commodore Lynch's vessels, moved down to attack Chi
illery officer might be utilized in strengthening the existing fortifications and in the construction of new defenses. J. R. Anderson, a retired soldier of Virginia, was commissioned by President Davis a brigadier-general and sent to the Cape Fear district. With the paucity of material at their command, these officers exerted every energy to aid General Gatlin, who was in charge of the whole department. General Hill, however, could be spared from his command for only a few months, and in November he was ordered back to command a division in General Johnston's army. Gen. L. O'B. Branch succeeded him and was put in command of the forces around New Bern, and Gen. Henry A. Wise was assigned to the command of Roanoke island. Mirth-provoking would have been some of the shifts for offensive and defensive weapons had not the issues at stake been human life. Antiquated smooth-bore cannon, mounted on the front wheels of ordinary farm wagons, drawn by mules with plow harness on, moved to op
lucky utilization of sand-bars, turf, and smooth-bore guns. As the Federal government tightened the blockade, rapidly raising the number of its ships from 42 in 1861 to 671 Lossing's Civil War. in 1864, it saw the necessity of possessing these sounds for safe anchorage, and it realized, as Scharf puts it, that they were depon and made it the basis of future operations against this coast. With the exception of a skirmish at Chicamacomico this battle ended the offensive operations in 1861. After the capture of Hatteras the Twentieth Indiana regiment was moved up the beach to hold Chicamacomico, or Loggerhead inlet. On the 1st of October the Federastly trust that if soldiers cannot be spared, I may at least hope that requisitions for arms and powder may be speedily and favorably attended to. But this was 1861, and military stores were not obtainable. Governor Clark and his people, however, were not of a race to succumb to difficulties without a desperate struggle, and
August, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 3
rossan, which dashed out from these inlets to reap a rich harvest in captured vessels, raised such an outcry in Northern business circles that there was added incentive to seize the home waters of these vessels. An illustration of the activity of these diminutive ships of war is found in the fact that in the month and a half preceding the capture of Hatteras they had seized as prizes eight schooners, seven barks and one brig. Schedule in Rebellion Records, IV, 588. Accordingly, in August, 1861, the Federal government fitted out at Fortress Monroe a combined army and navy expedition for an attack on the two forts at Hatteras. The land forces, Rebellion Records, IV, 580 consisting of 800 infantry and 60 artillerymen, were commanded by Gen. B. F. Butler; the naval force, comprising the war vessels Wabash, Susquehanna, Pawnee, Monticello, Cumberland, Harriet Lane and transport ships, carrying in all 143 guns, was commanded by Flag-Officer S. H. Stringham. these forces sailed f
cial correspondence of the successive officers detailed, as they could be spared from the Virginia field, to take charge of these coast defenses, awakens sympathy for them in their fruitless appeals to the government for proper munitions of war, and admiration for their untiring energies and plucky utilization of sand-bars, turf, and smooth-bore guns. As the Federal government tightened the blockade, rapidly raising the number of its ships from 42 in 1861 to 671 Lossing's Civil War. in 1864, it saw the necessity of possessing these sounds for safe anchorage, and it realized, as Scharf puts it, that they were depots from which the very central line of inland communication of the Confederates might be broken, and that they were the back-door to Norfolk, by which the navy yard might be regained. Moreover, the daring excursions of little Confederate vessels, mounting one or two guns, like the Winslow, under the restlessly energetic Thomas M. Crossan, which dashed out from these inl
Albemarle (search for this): chapter 3
d those of Colonel Fisher and Private Hanna were lying far beyond it. These assertions are substantiated by five officers present on the field, and by the written statements of many others, published years ago. This battle ended the fighting in Virginia for that year. North Carolina, however, was not so fortunate, for the next month saw Butler's descent upon its coast. The coast of North Carolina, as will be seen by the accompanying map, is indented by three large sounds: Currituck, Albemarle and Pamlico. Into these the rivers of that section, most of them navigable, empty. These were the great highways of trade, and by them, by the canal from Elizabeth City, and by the railroads from New Bern and Suffolk, the Confederacy was largely supplied with necessary stores. The command of the broad waters of these sounds, with their navigable rivers extending far into the interior, would control more than one-third of the State and threaten the main line of railroad between Richmo
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