hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 528 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill 262 18 Browse Search
Longstreet 173 27 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 171 11 Browse Search
R. F. Hoke 170 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 150 0 Browse Search
William Dorsey Pender 145 3 Browse Search
Jubal A. Early 143 1 Browse Search
James H. Lane 136 6 Browse Search
L. O'B. Branch 116 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

Found 244 total hits in 98 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Irvin McDowell (search for this): chapter 3
patriotic ardor. Toward the middle of July expectant eyes were turned to Virginia. The Confederate army under Generals Johnston and Beauregard was throwing itself into position to stop the On to Richmond march of the Federal army under Gen. Irvin McDowell. Two armies vastly greater than had ever before fought on this continent, and the largest volunteer armies ever assembled since the era of standing armies Beauregard in Battles and Leaders. were approaching each other. Battle is alwayuns, and not far away Griffin's superbly-equipped battery of Fifth United States regulars. These batteries, the com manders of which both rose to be major-generals, had done excellent service during the day, and not until they were captured was McDowell's army routed. At the time of Fisher's arrival these guns, which had only recently been moved to this plateau, were supported by the Eleventh New York (Fire Zouaves) and the Fourteenth (Brooklyn) New York. Fisher's presence was not even suspec
John A. McPherson (search for this): chapter 3
vior at the head of his regiment with ranks greatly thinned. With him went down many North Carolinians whose names were not so prominent, but whose conduct was as heroic. Roy's Regimental History. Just as the Sixth reached the guns there was a lull in the fierce contest, and officers and men sought a moment's rest. Young Wiley P. Mangum, exclaiming, I am so tired! threw himself under the quiet shadow of one of the guns, so recently charged with death, and Captain Avery, Lieuts. John A. McPherson, B. F. White, A. C. Avery and others gathered around the battery. Just then, from a wood in their left front, the Second Wisconsin regiment fired into the Carolinians. This regiment was dressed in gray uniform, Sherman's Memoirs. and from this fact, as well as from its position, the officers of the Sixth thought it was a Confederate regiment and called out to their men who were beginning to return the fire not to shoot, and made signals to the supposed friends. Young Mangum,
D. K. McRae (search for this): chapter 3
raditions, gloried in the same history, and differed only in the construction of the Constitution. In this great battle, so signally victorious for the Confederate arms, North Carolina had fewer troops engaged than it had in any other important battle of the armies in Virginia. Col. W. W. Kirkland's Eleventh (afterward Twenty-first) regiment, with two companies— Captain Conolly's and Captain Wharton's—attached, and the Fifth, Lieut.-Col. J. P. Jones in command during the sickness of Colonel McRae, were present, but so situated that they took no decided part in the engagement The Sixth regiment was hotly engaged, however, and lost its gallant colonel, Charles F. Fisher. This regiment had, by a dangerous ride on the Manassas railroad, been hurried forward to take part in the expected engagement. When it arrived at Manassas Junction, the battle was already raging. Colonel Fisher moved his regiment forward entirely under cover until he reached an open field leading up to the fam
ty regiments in the field; for it was evident the Confederacy could not do it. Major Gordon gives this account of how it was done: The legislature directed General Martin, late in September, to provide winter clothing, shoes, etc., for the troops. The time was short and it was no small task, but he went about it with his usual energy. He organized a clothing factory in Raleigh, under Captain Garrett; every mill in the State was made to furnish every yard of cloth that was possible; Capt. A. Myers was sent through North Carolina, South Carolina and as far south as Savannah, purchasing everything that was available for clothing the troops. The ladies came nobly to their assistance and furnished blankets, quilts and whatever they could. Many carpets were torn up, and by the combined efforts of the ladies and the officers, these were lined with cotton and made into quilts. The troops of North Carolina were clothed the first winter of the war, if not exactly according to military r
hen a rising gale drove the ships out to sea, the fleet fiercely bombarded the forts. In this engagement Boynton, as quoted by Hawkins, Battles and Leaders. asserts that Commodore Stringham introduced the system of ships firing while in motion instead of waiting to fire from anchorage, a system adopted by Farragut and which has, in the Spanish- American war, given such world-wide celebrity to the fleets of Admirals Dewey and Sampson. The next morning the Federal fleet, using improved Paixhan, Dahlgren and columbiad guns, stood well out from shore and battered to pieces the forts and their guns. This they did in perfect safety, for, says Flag-Officer Barron, Official Report of the Confederate navy, who arrived at Hatteras on the evening of the 28th and succeeded to the command, not a shot from our battery reached them with the greatest elevation that we could get. So, adds Barron, without the ability to damage our adversary, and just at this time the magazine being reported
s hotly engaged, however, and lost its gallant colonel, Charles F. Fisher. This regiment had, by a dangerous ride on the Manassas railroad, been hurried forward to take part in the expected engagement. When it arrived at Manassas Junction, the battle was already raging. Colonel Fisher moved his regiment forward entirely under cover until he reached an open field leading up to the famous Henry house plateau, on which were posted Ricketts' magnificent battery of Federal regulars with six Parrott guns, and not far away Griffin's superbly-equipped battery of Fifth United States regulars. These batteries, the com manders of which both rose to be major-generals, had done excellent service during the day, and not until they were captured was McDowell's army routed. At the time of Fisher's arrival these guns, which had only recently been moved to this plateau, were supported by the Eleventh New York (Fire Zouaves) and the Fourteenth (Brooklyn) New York. Fisher's presence was not even
Fitz John Porter (search for this): chapter 3
mage our adversary, and just at this time the magazine being reported on fire . . . I ordered a white flag to be shown. The immediate results of this expedition, says General Hawkins, Battles and Leaders. were the capture of 670 men, 1,000 stand of arms, 35 cannon and two strong forts; the possession of the best sea entrance to the inland waters of North Carolina, and the stoppage of a favorite channel through which many supplies had been carried for the use of the Confederate forces. Porter, in his Naval History, comments: This was our first naval victory—indeed, our first victory of any kind, and great was the rejoicing thereat throughout the United States. The Federals at once occupied this commanding position and made it the basis of future operations against this coast. With the exception of a skirmish at Chicamacomico this battle ended the offensive operations in 1861. After the capture of Hatteras the Twentieth Indiana regiment was moved up the beach to hold Chicamac
Rebellion Records (search for this): chapter 3
n the fact that in the month and a half preceding the capture of Hatteras they had seized as prizes eight schooners, seven barks and one brig. Schedule in Rebellion Records, IV, 588. Accordingly, in August, 1861, the Federal government fitted out at Fortress Monroe a combined army and navy expedition for an attack on the two forts at Hatteras. The land forces, Rebellion Records, IV, 580 consisting of 800 infantry and 60 artillerymen, were commanded by Gen. B. F. Butler; the naval force, comprising the war vessels Wabash, Susquehanna, Pawnee, Monticello, Cumberland, Harriet Lane and transport ships, carrying in all 143 guns, was commanded by Flag-Ogiment, Col. W. F. Martin, and some detachments of the Tenth North Carolina artillery. The whole force on the first day of the engagement amounted to 580 Rebellion Records, IV, 574. men. On the second day the Ellis Scharf's History Confederate Navy. landed some reinforcements, raising the number to 718. The post was command
Colonel Fisher moved his regiment forward entirely under cover until he reached an open field leading up to the famous Henry house plateau, on which were posted Ricketts' magnificent battery of Federal regulars with six Parrott guns, and not far away Griffin's superbly-equipped battery of Fifth United States regulars. These battNew York. Fisher's presence was not even suspected by the enemy until he broke cover about, says Captain White, Ms. Regimental History. 125 yards in front of Ricketts' battery, and with commendable gallantry, but with lamentable inexperience, cried out to his regiment, which was then moving by flank and not in line of battle, General Beauregard says, Fisher's North Carolina regiment came in happy time to join in the charge on our left. Official Report. The Sixth was so close to Ricketts that the elevation of his guns lessened their deadly effect, and its close-range volleys soon drove back the supporting zouaves and terribly cut down his brave g
is loved regiment heard from his lips. In prompt obedience the seven companies rushed up to the guns, whose officers fought them until their men were nearly all cut down and their commander seriously wounded. But the charge was a costly one. Colonel Fisher, in the words of General Beauregard, fell after soldierly behavior at the head of his regiment with ranks greatly thinned. With him went down many North Carolinians whose names were not so prominent, but whose conduct was as heroic. Roy's Regimental History. Just as the Sixth reached the guns there was a lull in the fierce contest, and officers and men sought a moment's rest. Young Wiley P. Mangum, exclaiming, I am so tired! threw himself under the quiet shadow of one of the guns, so recently charged with death, and Captain Avery, Lieuts. John A. McPherson, B. F. White, A. C. Avery and others gathered around the battery. Just then, from a wood in their left front, the Second Wisconsin regiment fired into the Carolinia
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10