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Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
t was Pickett, and then Hood holding Longstreet's right. In Hood's division there were three North Carolina regiments. Jackson's troops were massed along the line of the Fredericksburg & Potomac railroad. A. P. Hill held the front line without mucn batteries of Anderson, Ransom and McLaws, including Manly's North Carolina battery, were stationed along the line. On Jackson's front, fourteen pieces of artillery, including a section of Latham's battery, were posted under Lieutenant-Colonel Walker, and Stuart's horse artillery and cavalry were on Jackson's right flank. North Carolina had present in the army thus drawn up, thirty-two regiments and one battalion of infantry, two regiments of cavalry, and three batteries of artillery. Two orps headquarters, a handsome compliment to these two regiments was read at dress parade. The effort to break through Jackson's lines met a bloody and disastrous repulse. Birney's division was sent to cover the retreat of Meade and Gibbon, and F
Washington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
l Baker says: This was one of the boldest and most successful attacks on gunboats that I know of during the war. On September 6th a small expedition, under the command of Col. S. D. Pool, arranged for an attack on the Federal garrison at Washington, N. C. This town was held by a force under Colonel Potter, of the First North Carolina Union cavalry. Colonel Pool's force consisted of two companies from the Seventeenth regiment, two from the Fifty-fifth under Capt. P. M. Mull, 50 men under Cap3d, and a lively skirmish took place across the river. In spite of the fact that General Peck reported his force as having inflicted a loss of from 75 to 200, the Confederate casualties were 2 wounded. General Foster with 5,oco men left Washington, N. C., for Williamston, on the 2d of November. At Little creek and at Rawls' mill, spirited resistance to his advance was offered by the Confederates, and Foster lost 6 killed and 8 wounded. The Confederates, however, were not in force enough to
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
eral Martin contended for its adoption, Major Gordon proceeds: The governor reserved his decision that night, but when asked for it next day, he authorized General Martin to buy the ship and clothing for the troops, and signed sufficient bonds for this purpose. The next thing for the adjutant-general to do was to get a man of ability and responsibility to be sent as agent to England. The governor made no suggestion on this point. On the recommendation of Major Hogg, Mr. (John) White, of Warrenton, was selected as State agent to go abroad to purchase the ship and supplies, and Col. Tom Crossan was sent to command the ship, and well did they perform this and every other duty intrusted to them by the State. In due time the steamer Lord Clyde, afterward named the Advance, arrived safely in Wilmington with supplies for the troops. Governor Vance got a great deal of credit forth is; General Martin, who was the real author of it, practically none. From this time forward it is certain t
Falmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ttack Lee in his chosen position. Burnside had organized his army into three grand divisions, under Sumner, Hooker and Franklin. The first weeks in December, these grand divisions were stretched along the northern bank of the Rappahannock, and were searching for ways to cross over for an attack. On the southern side of the river, Lee's army was posted on the hills and ridges just back of Fredericksburg. His line extended parallel to the river, and stretched from a point just across from Falmouth to Hamilton's crossing, a distance of about three miles. His left was under Longstreet, and his right under Jackson. R. H. Anderson's division formed the extreme left of Longstreet. His line reached from Taylor's hill to the foot of Marye's hill. There, in the famous sunken road behind a stone wall, Cobb's brigade of McLaws' division was posted. On the left of Cobb and on the prolongation of his line, the Twenty-fourth North Carolina stood. General Ransom was in charge of a North Caro
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ready to receive us. The cavalry was ordered to charge these men, which was done in good style and with a full allowance of the rebel yell. The enemy fired one volley and broke in all directions. Some escaped to the gunboats in skiffs, some hid, some took to the houses and fired from the windows. Quite a lively cannonade ensued between the gunboats and our battery. Captain Galloway and three privates were wounded. Two days before the battle of Fredericksburg, General Foster left New Bern, N. C., with a force of 10,000 infantry, 6 batteries, having in all 40 pieces of artillery, and 640 cavalry. Rebellion Records, XVIII, 54. On the 13th, Foster had reached Southwest creek, not far from Kinston. The Confederates had destroyed the bridge, and Colonel Radcliffe's Sixty-first North Carolina regiment was posted on the west side to delay Foster's advance. The Ninth New Jersey and Wessell's brigade crossed over the creek, and after an engagement of about an hour, Gen. N. G. Evans
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ops brought by the advance engagements in North Carolina battle near Goldsboro North Carolina troNorth Carolina troops in the Western army battles of Murfreesboro and Stone river. The last great battle of 1862 w stood. General Ransom was in charge of a North Carolina division of eight regiments, and this was illed, 595; wounded, 4,074; missing, 653. North Carolina losses were: killed, 173; wounded, 1,294. itself was the first regiment organized in North Carolina, and while known as the First North Carolis reported by General Smith, was 339. The North Carolina losses, with the exception of the Sixty-fi During the operations mentioned above, North Carolina was represented in the Western army by theis regiment was raised in the mountains of North Carolina and had in it two companies of Cherokee Ibattles at Murfreesboro and Stone's river, North Carolina had engaged these regiments: Twenty-ninth,us, and we were ordered to fall back. The North Carolina losses in these battles were 10 killed, 14[9 more...]
Stone River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 8: The Fredericksburg campaign affairs in North Carolina supplies for troops brought by the advance engagements in North Carolina battle near Goldsboro North Carolina troops in the Western army battles of Murfreesboro and Stone river. The last great battle of 1862 was fought on the hills around Fredericksburg. There, seeing the design of the Federal commander, General Lee concentrated his army to await attack. General McClellan had been displaced by the Federal authorities on the 8th of November, and General Burnside appointed to succeed him as commander in the field. The new leader, yielding to public pressure for some success before the year closed, prepared to attack Lee in his chosen position. Burnside had organized his army into three grand divisions, under Sumner, Hooker and Franklin. The first weeks in December, these grand divisions were stretched along the northern bank of the Rappahannock, and were searching for ways to cross over for an att
Southwest (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
n all directions. Some escaped to the gunboats in skiffs, some hid, some took to the houses and fired from the windows. Quite a lively cannonade ensued between the gunboats and our battery. Captain Galloway and three privates were wounded. Two days before the battle of Fredericksburg, General Foster left New Bern, N. C., with a force of 10,000 infantry, 6 batteries, having in all 40 pieces of artillery, and 640 cavalry. Rebellion Records, XVIII, 54. On the 13th, Foster had reached Southwest creek, not far from Kinston. The Confederates had destroyed the bridge, and Colonel Radcliffe's Sixty-first North Carolina regiment was posted on the west side to delay Foster's advance. The Ninth New Jersey and Wessell's brigade crossed over the creek, and after an engagement of about an hour, Gen. N. G. Evans, commanding the Confederates, was obliged to withdraw. He took position on the Neuse river, about two miles from Kinston bridge. General Evans had, to oppose Foster's 10,000 men,
Plymouth, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ery creditable to the officers and men engaged. On December 10th, Lieut.-Col. John C. Lamb, with some companies from the Seventeenth regiment, a squadron of cavalry under Colonel Evans, and Moore's battery, captured for a time the town of Plymouth, N. C. Colonel Galloway gives the following account of the adventure: The plan was to capture the pickets and take the place by surprise. We reached the picket station just before day, captured all but one, who escaped, firing his musket as he ran. This gave notice of our approach, and when we reached Plymouth, a body of Federals were seen formed across the main street ready to receive us. The cavalry was ordered to charge these men, which was done in good style and with a full allowance of the rebel yell. The enemy fired one volley and broke in all directions. Some escaped to the gunboats in skiffs, some hid, some took to the houses and fired from the windows. Quite a lively cannonade ensued between the gunboats and our battery. Ca
Murfreesboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
e advance engagements in North Carolina battle near Goldsboro North Carolina troops in the Western army battles of Murfreesboro and Stone river. The last great battle of 1862 was fought on the hills around Fredericksburg. There, seeing the dewounded and dead, for which ample apology was made at the time. Regimental History. In General Bragg's battles at Murfreesboro and Stone's river, North Carolina had engaged these regiments: Twenty-ninth, Thirty-ninth and Sixtieth Col. R. B. Vance, after the death of Gen. J. E. Rains, commanded the Second brigade of Stevenson's division. At Murfreesboro, on the 31st of December, the Twenty-ninth was under fire for over five hours, captured one piece of artillery, and engaged in a gallant chsubsequent movements until it was detached. The Sixtieth regiment, Colonel McDowell, was in both these battles. At Murfreesboro, it was at the opening of the battle under a heavy fire of artillery, but advanced without hesitation until thrown int
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