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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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t. Private Adam Carpenter bore the flag with courage and faithfulness, and Color-Corporals Jones and Morgan were both wounded. Lieutenants Weeks, Tatum and Millen were severely wounded. I would specially commend the gallantry and devotion of the litter corps under Private Joseph Breland. They kept up with the regiment and rendered prompt assistance to the wounded, several of them being themselves wounded on the field. At the close of the battle the ranking officer of the brigade was Captain Gillis, of the Forty-sixth Georgia. Of the general's staff Capt. H. D. Garden alone remained. When the generals and field officers of Gist's brigade were either killed or wounded, the company officers led their men in the assault upon the enemy's works. The Tenth and Nineteenth South Carolina, in Manigault's brigade, Edward Johnson's division, got into the battle late in the evening, but did their duty well. Gen. Stephen D. Lee reported: Brigadier-General Manigault, commanding a brigade o
B. Burgh Smith (search for this): chapter 20
enty-fourth South Carolina. On the left of his regiment Colonel Capers had made a barricade of logs, at right angles to the line, as a protection against a fire from the west side of the cut. Assisted by the adjutant-general of the brigade, Maj. B. B. Smith, and Lieutenant Holmes, adjutant of the Twenty-fourth, Colonel Capers rallied his companies, which, led by their commanding lieutenants, Easterling (Company B), Beckham (Company G) and Seigler (Company K), charged the barricade, drove Kimbaldon. Though this line was torn to pieces by a terrible enfilade fire, by which Strahl and his entire staff were killed and Carter mortally wounded, there was no backward movement of the line. The gallant fellows pressed on to the ditch. Maj. B. Burgh Smith, of the brigade staff, who was commanding the Sixteenth South Carolina, was now the senior officer of the brigade, every superior officer being either killed or wounded. About 10:30 p. m. Lieut. James A. Tillman, of the Twenty-fourth, led
ve Maj. D. F. Hill, of the Twenty-fourth, was killed, while directing the fire of the left of the regiment. It was now growing dark, and the lieutenant-general in person rode up and congratulated Colonel Capers on the success of his regiment. The commander of the Fourth corps, General Stanley, in his report explained his delayed attack as in part owing to the dense undergrowth in front of the enemy, and further, to the slow progress the skirmishers made in pushing back those of the enemy. Grose and Kirby both reported that they could not carry the position in their front owing to the perfect entanglement made by cutting down the thick undergrowth in front of the rail barricade the rebels had hastily thrown up. This was the entanglement made by Gist's men with their pocket-knives. General Stanley continues: Newton's division had a much longer circuit to make and when moved forward the right brigade (Wagner's) found no enemy in front [Wagner was far to the right and on the rear of G
J. E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 20
Chattanooga to Atlanta. South Carolina was represented in each of Johnston's two corps, in Hardee's by the Sixteenth regiment, Col. James McCd fully in the campaign which followed, in the course of which General Johnston skillfully withdrew his forces, with inconsiderable loss, from engaged below Resaca against the enemy, whose crossing endangered Johnston's position. Meanwhile the battle of Resaca came on and Walker's de of the enemy's batteries. They took position at the center, but Johnston was compelled to withdraw that night. On the 16th Hardee's corps 17th, Colonel Capers wrote in his report, the commanding general (Johnston) published an address to the army, and announced that he would attdent spirit prevailed. Next day . . . the farewell address of General Johnston was received and read to the regiment. It is due to truth to g off their hats. It had been proposed to halt and cheer, but General Johnston, hearing of our intention, requested that the troops march by
G. A. Jennison (search for this): chapter 20
s fight Manigault's brigade was again engaged. Capt. T. W. Getzen was in command of the Twenty-fourth, and after he and Captain Home were wounded, the gallant Adjt. James O. Ferrell reported to General Manigault that all his captains were now wounded or killed, and the general ordered the adjutant himself to take command. The loss of the Twenty-fourth that day was 53. The Tenth was engaged with like gallantry, its commander, Lieut.-Col. C. Irvin Walker, falling painfully wounded. Lieuts. G. A. Jennison and W. E. Huger, of Manigault's staff, were among the wounded. The brigade made repeated assaults, and left dead and wounded within a few feet of the Federal intrenchments, but the Confederate battle was not successful. The investment of Atlanta was actively pressed after the battles of the latter part of July to the 25th of August, 1864. During that period the Federal line was firmly established on the east, north and west of the city, and steadily pushed southwestward. On Aug
John C. Brown (search for this): chapter 20
ardee's corps, commanded by General Cleburne, occupied the left, the divisions of Bate (under J. C. Brown) and Cleburne (under Lowrey) in front, and Cheatham's (under General Maney, and including Gisbefore Dalton on the 13th at 1 p. m. General Hood summoned the fort, which surrendered after John C. Brown's division (including Gist's brigade) was ordered to carry it by assault. Leaving Dalton on the left. The divisions were formed in two lines from right to left as follows: Cleburne's, Brown's and Bate's. In Brown's division, Gist's and Gordon's brigades occupied the front and Carter's Brown's division, Gist's and Gordon's brigades occupied the front and Carter's and Strahl's the rear line. Stewart's corps was on the right of the pike. At 4 o'clock p. m. the two corps moved down the hills, Brown's division marching by the right flank of regiments until theyBrown's division marching by the right flank of regiments until they had descended the slopes, then forming forward into line. As they advanced, the front line of the enemy was steadily driven back. Says Colonel Capers in his report: Just before the charge was
last campaign in Tennessee battle of Franklin. Simultaneous with the crossing of the Rapidan river in Virginia by the Federal army of Meade, Gen. W. T. Sherman, in command of the armies of the Cumberland, Tennessee and Ohio, under Thomas, McPherson and Schofield, in all about 100,000 strong, advanced against the army of Tennessee, then under Gen. J. E. Johnston, and occupying the valley and mountain strongholds about Dalton, on the railroad from Chattanooga to Atlanta. South Carolina wass winter quarters near Atlanta, and took position near Mill Creek gap. Captain Wever's company, of the Twenty-fourth, was the first engaged at this point, but the brigade was soon transferred to Resaca, to meet the Federal flanking column under McPherson. Then crossing the river the two regiments were engaged below Resaca against the enemy, whose crossing endangered Johnston's position. Meanwhile the battle of Resaca came on and Walker's division hurried back across the river, the Twenty-four
William J. Hardee (search for this): chapter 20
ed an attack upon Thomas on Peachtree creek by Hardee and Stewart (Polk's corps), while his corps, uted to be marching for Jonesboro. The head of Hardee's corps reached Jonesboro about sunrise, and tssee was ready for battle. As the troops of Hardee and Lee arrived on the 31st, they were quicklyand including Gist's brigade) in reserve. General Hardee ordered the attack to begin on the extremeom shelter, or even in the open. The corps of Hardee and Lee were physically unfit for the heroic eo what seemed almost certain capture, and left Hardee to defend the supplies and ordnance trains of ole of the force of General Sherman. Lee left Hardee before day on September 1st. That he succeede a quarter of a mile beyond the right flank of Hardee's position. General Sherman's plan of attack tly restored under his eye. About midnight General Hardee had successfully left his lines, and by dathe 3d, and Sherman's advance was deploying in Hardee's front by sunrise on the 2d. A battle was su[18 more...]
f Bate (under J. C. Brown) and Cleburne (under Lowrey) in front, and Cheatham's (under General Maneyred the attack to begin on the extreme left by Lowrey, to be followed up from left to right, Lowrey Lowrey and Brown wheeling to their right and Lee attacking directly in front. Lowrey engaged the skirmisheLowrey engaged the skirmishers in his front at 3 o'clock, and Lee, hearing his fire, led his corps forward. Lee was repulsed, but Lowrey on the extreme left was brilliantly successful, driving the enemy in his front across the reme left of Cheatham's division, and followed Lowrey's advance; but was not actively engaged and sut with the one exception of Cleburne's, led by Lowrey. The whole attack was most unsatisfactory andhe left, and north of the hamlet of Jonesboro, Lowrey on the right, Brown in the center and Carter (, about 4 o'clock, concentrated his assault on Lowrey, carried the position on the railroad, and cap railroad, from which they fired directly down Lowrey's line. Meanwhile the assaults in front were [1 more...]
F. Hill, of the Twenty-fourth, was killed, while directing the fire of the left of the regiment. It was now growing dark, and the lieutenant-general in person rode up and congratulated Colonel Capers on the success of his regiment. The commander of the Fourth corps, General Stanley, in his report explained his delayed attack as in part owing to the dense undergrowth in front of the enemy, and further, to the slow progress the skirmishers made in pushing back those of the enemy. Grose and Kirby both reported that they could not carry the position in their front owing to the perfect entanglement made by cutting down the thick undergrowth in front of the rail barricade the rebels had hastily thrown up. This was the entanglement made by Gist's men with their pocket-knives. General Stanley continues: Newton's division had a much longer circuit to make and when moved forward the right brigade (Wagner's) found no enemy in front [Wagner was far to the right and on the rear of Gist's righ
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