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John K. Hood (search for this): chapter 20
uson's battery, Lieut. R. T. Beauregard; and in Hood's corps by the Tenth regiment, Col. James F. Pra movement toward the southeast of Atlanta, General Hood caused an attack upon Thomas on Peachtree cuth Carolina artillery officer, took command of Hood's corps, with the rank of lieutenant-general, asteadily pushed southwestward. On August 25th, Hood's line, west and south of Atlanta, had extendeds distant from the city. Early in August General Hood sent General Wheeler with half his cavalry s hard at work breaking up the Macon railroad. Hood was holding on to Atlanta with Stewart's corps,ordered everything against Jonesboro, while General Hood directed Hardee to return Lee's corps to Atptember 1st. That he succeeded in reaching General Hood, with Thomas and Schofield directly in his battle on the 1st and of its results, that General Hood reported to Richmond: Hardee's corps was ating these events, Sherman retreated to Atlanta, Hood concentrated his army at Palmetto, near the Cha[10 more...]
Adrian C. Appleby (search for this): chapter 20
until about midnight when the enemy retired, leaving the Confederates in possession of the bloody field of Franklin. Colonel Capers, in his report commended Lieutenant Tillman, who in turn praised the gallantry of Privates J. P. Blackwell, Anderson Walls and J. B. O. Carpenter. I would also mention specially the gallantry of Privates Prewett and Mock, both of whom were killed on the line of the enemy. Lieut. W. M. Beckham, acting adjutant; Captain Bowers, Lieuts. Claude F. Beaty, Adrian C. Appleby, C. D. Easterling, McDaniel, and Andrews were conspicuous in the field for their gallant conduct. Private Adam Carpenter bore the flag with courage and faithfulness, and Color-Corporals Jones and Morgan were both wounded. Lieutenants Weeks, Tatum and Millen were severely wounded. I would specially commend the gallantry and devotion of the litter corps under Private Joseph Breland. They kept up with the regiment and rendered prompt assistance to the wounded, several of them being th
H. D. Garden (search for this): chapter 20
sight inspired every man of the Twenty-fourth with the sentiment of duty. As we were pressing back the enemy's advance forces, Lieut.-Col. J. S. Jones fell mortally wounded in front of the right of the regiment. General Gist, attended by Capt. H. D. Garden and Lieut. Frank Trenholm of his staff, rode down our front, and returning ordered the charge, in concert with General Gordon. In passing from the left to the right of the regiment, General Gist waved his hat to us, expressed his pride andent and rendered prompt assistance to the wounded, several of them being themselves wounded on the field. At the close of the battle the ranking officer of the brigade was Captain Gillis, of the Forty-sixth Georgia. Of the general's staff Capt. H. D. Garden alone remained. When the generals and field officers of Gist's brigade were either killed or wounded, the company officers led their men in the assault upon the enemy's works. The Tenth and Nineteenth South Carolina, in Manigault's brigad
Alf Clayton (search for this): chapter 20
t, the divisions of Patton Anderson (including Manigault's brigade) and Stevenson in front, and Clayton's in reserve. Hardee's corps, commanded by General Cleburne, occupied the left, the divisions s. Manigault had a more exciting experience. His brigade for this engagement was assigned to Clayton's division, supporting Anderson and Stevenson. General Clayton describes the attack of the froGeneral Clayton describes the attack of the front line as wanting in dash and persistency. Ordered up on its first repulse, Manigault on his left, Holtzclaw next, and Gibson on his right, Clayton led his division with spirit. Encountering a raiClayton led his division with spirit. Encountering a rail fence, parallel to his advance, and the enemy's rifle-pits near it, a large part of the division halted at these obstructions to return the enemy's fire of musketry and canister which raked their ranks. To this circumstance the repulse of the division was due. Never (says General Clayton) was a charge begun with such enthusiasm terminated with accomplishing so little. Gibson led the brigad
Edward Johnson (search for this): chapter 20
near the Chattahoochee, Hardee was supplanted by Cheatham in corps command, and General Gist took command of Cheatham's division. In Manigault's brigade, of Edward Johnson's division, the Tenth South Carolina was under command of Lieut.-Col. C. Irvine Walker, the Nineteenth of Capt. Thomas W. Getzen. Gist's brigade was commandekilled or wounded, the company officers led their men in the assault upon the enemy's works. The Tenth and Nineteenth South Carolina, in Manigault's brigade, Edward Johnson's division, got into the battle late in the evening, but did their duty well. Gen. Stephen D. Lee reported: Brigadier-General Manigault, commanding a brigaed and Colonel Davis wounded. I have never seen greater evidence of gallantry than was displayed by this division under command of that admirable soldier, Maj.-Gen. Ed. Johnson. On no battlefield of the war was South Carolina more nobly illustrated by her gallant sons. But their valor was equaled by their endurance of hardship
W. M. Beckham (search for this): chapter 20
d their position against repeated attempts of the Federals to regain the works, until about midnight when the enemy retired, leaving the Confederates in possession of the bloody field of Franklin. Colonel Capers, in his report commended Lieutenant Tillman, who in turn praised the gallantry of Privates J. P. Blackwell, Anderson Walls and J. B. O. Carpenter. I would also mention specially the gallantry of Privates Prewett and Mock, both of whom were killed on the line of the enemy. Lieut. W. M. Beckham, acting adjutant; Captain Bowers, Lieuts. Claude F. Beaty, Adrian C. Appleby, C. D. Easterling, McDaniel, and Andrews were conspicuous in the field for their gallant conduct. Private Adam Carpenter bore the flag with courage and faithfulness, and Color-Corporals Jones and Morgan were both wounded. Lieutenants Weeks, Tatum and Millen were severely wounded. I would specially commend the gallantry and devotion of the litter corps under Private Joseph Breland. They kept up with the re
Ellison Capers (search for this): chapter 20
Federal shells began to fall in his camp. Colonel Capers, with his regiment and Shaaff's Georgia she crossed the Chattahoochee. On the 17th, Colonel Capers wrote in his report, the commanding genera, and the Twenty-fourth South Carolina, Col. Ellison Capers, occupied the position at the railroad ade which fell on Whiteley's sharpshooters and Capers' regiment. Davis' troops on the west side of uth Carolina. On the left of his regiment Colonel Capers had made a barricade of logs, at right angant Holmes, adjutant of the Twenty-fourth, Colonel Capers rallied his companies, which, led by theireneral in person rode up and congratulated Colonel Capers on the success of his regiment. The commavalley. Early next morning, October 16th, Colonel Capers was ordered to march back with his regimen many were captured and sent to the rear. Colonel Capers, of the Twenty-fourth, fell wounded just bession of the bloody field of Franklin. Colonel Capers, in his report commended Lieutenant Tillma[11 more...]
W. J. Carter (search for this): chapter 20
sition covered by cavalry on the left, and north of the hamlet of Jonesboro, Lowrey on the right, Brown in the center and Carter (Anderson) on the left. Gist's South Carolina and Georgia brigade was on the extreme left flank. The whole line was in left as follows: Cleburne's, Brown's and Bate's. In Brown's division, Gist's and Gordon's brigades occupied the front and Carter's and Strahl's the rear line. Stewart's corps was on the right of the pike. At 4 o'clock p. m. the two corps moved downed the parapet, on which the colors of the Twenty-fourth South Carolina were planted, and there remained. Strahl's and Carter's brigades went gallantly to the assistance of Gist and Gordon. Though this line was torn to pieces by a terrible enfilade fire, by which Strahl and his entire staff were killed and Carter mortally wounded, there was no backward movement of the line. The gallant fellows pressed on to the ditch. Maj. B. Burgh Smith, of the brigade staff, who was commanding the Sixtee
n position at Jonesboro. The result was the loss of eight guns and some prisoners. Hardee then retired to Lovejoy's Station, where he was joined by Stewart's and Lee's corps. No dates were given by General Hood. Stewart and Lee did not reach Lovejoy's until the evening of the 3d, and Sherman's advance was deploying in Hardee's front by sunrise on the 2d. A battle was successfully fought all that day by the pickets, and again on the 3d, so that when Stewart and Lee came up from Atlanta on Gd the Confederate commander had only to strengthen a well-chosen position by the reinforcement of Lee's and Stewart's corps. If the attack of August 31st was disappointing, surely the splendid defense of September 1st, the successful retreat to Lovejoy's and the defiant resistance of a single corps on the 2d and 3d, with the safety of the trains, ought to have cheered the heart of the commanding general and inspired a gallant soldier's commendation. Following these events, Sherman retreated
epulsed the attack. Learning soon after that a force was moving around to get in his rear, Colonel Capers conducted his regiment to the rear by the right flank, each company firing up to the moment of marching. At the foot of the ridge they were relieved by cavalry, and the regiment was conducted to the bivouac of the brigade on the Summerville road. The Twenty-fourth lost 4 officers and about 40 men in this spirited skirmish at Ship's gap. Captains Roddey, Steinmeyer and Sherard and Lieutenant Gray were captured with about half of the force they commanded. It could not be ascertained how many of those cut off were killed or wounded. Only 8 were wounded in the gap. On the next day the march of Cheatham's corps was continued. On October 18th they crossed the line of Georgia and Alabama, and on the 21st halted at Gadsden, where they received their mail and drew blankets, clothing and shoes, not enough to supply all necessities, but to relieve the most needy. Twenty men of the
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