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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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at Savannah for the honor of this service. Colonel Lawton selected details from the Chatham artillery, under Capt. Joseph S. Cleghorn, an officer who was also charged by the governor with all matters relating to ordnance; from the Savannah Guards, Capt. John Screven, and from the Oglethorpe Light Infantry, Capt. Francis S. Bartow, whose brilliant eloquence had been devoted to the cause of separation. This force, numbering 134 men, was carried by boat to Cockspur island on the morning of the 3d, and the occupation was effected without resistance from the few men in the works, who were allowed to continue in their quarters without duress. The militia under Colonel Lawton immediately hoisted a State flag—a red lone star on a white ground—which they greeted with a salute, and then set to work putting the fort in order, mounting the guns, and preparing ammunition. The Savannah ladies furnished the cartridge bags, as well as dainty additions to the rations of the soldiers, in which acce
, and it is believed now has a movement on foot to reinforce Fort Sumter at Charleston, and to occupy with Federal troops the Southern forts, including Fort Pulaski in this State, which, if done, would give the Federal government in any contest great advantage over the people of this State; to the end, therefore, that this stronghold, which commands also the entrance into Georgia, may not be occupied by any hostile force until the convention of the State of Georgia, which is to meet on the 16th inst., has decided on the policy which Georgia will adopt in this emergency, you are ordered to take possession of Fort Pulaski as by public order herewith, and to hold it against all persons, to be abandoned only under orders from me or under compulsion by an overwhelming hostile force. There was an enthusiastic rivalry among the militia companies at Savannah for the honor of this service. Colonel Lawton selected details from the Chatham artillery, under Capt. Joseph S. Cleghorn, an offic
rs, 2 cannon, and much ammunition came into their possession. A day or two later, Col. A. R. Lawton, in command at Savannah, under instructions from the governor demanded possession of the Oglethorpe barracks, through Lieut. W. S. Bassinger. Ordnance-Sergeant Burt, in charge in the absence of Captain Whiting, refused to recognize Colonel Lawton's authority, or to allow Lieutenant Bassinger to interfere with the barracks or public property, but had no force to sustain his action, and on the 26th, Bassinger, with the assistance of the city police, fastened up the public store-room and took possession of the barracks. Sergeant Burt consistently maintained his position by refusing to have any official communication with Lieutenant Bassinger. Upon Captain Whiting's return, January 28th, Colonel Lawton addressed him the following letter: Sir: I am instructed by the governor and commander-in-chief of the State of Georgia to take possession of Oglethorpe barracks, in the name of the S
le you are closing up your business here. The steamer Ida and appurtenances have also been taken possession of under the same authority. This, I believe, includes all the property held by you in the State of Georgia, as military engineer of the United States, but does not include any lighthouse property. You have already been notified, informally, that Forts Pulaski and Jackson had been occupied by the troops of the State of Georgia under my command. Another famous incident of this first month of 1861 was the seizure at New York, probably on the orders of the governor of that State, of thirty-eight boxes of muskets, purchased by the firm of D. C. Hodgkins & Sons, Macon, for shipment by the steamer Monticello to Savannah. After a sharp remonstrance, which was unheeded, Governor Brown directed Colonel Lawton to order out sufficient military force and seize and hold, subject to his order, every ship then in the harbor of Savannah, belonging to citizens of New York. When the pro
January 1st (search for this): chapter 1
nd Jackson would be seized by the people, visited the city, and after consultation with the citizens took the appropriate step of ordering an immediate occupation. The earnest spirit of the citizens of Savannah was manifested on the night of January 1st, by a number of persons dressed in citizens' clothes but armed with muskets and revolvers, who boarded the revenue cutter J. C. Dobbin and announced that they had come in force, largely outnumbering the crew, to take the vessel in the name of n of all the government property for the present, by order of the governor of the State, and intended to preserve it from loss or damage. He requested a return of the public property, both ordnance and engineer, which I have given as existing January 1st. . . . I have directed Ordnance-Sergeant Walker to report at Oglethorpe barracks until further orders. The fort keeper I have discharged. . . . . It is necessary to inform you that the telegraph is in the hands of the State authorities, and n
January 6th (search for this): chapter 1
esistance from the few men in the works, who were allowed to continue in their quarters without duress. The militia under Colonel Lawton immediately hoisted a State flag—a red lone star on a white ground—which they greeted with a salute, and then set to work putting the fort in order, mounting the guns, and preparing ammunition. The Savannah ladies furnished the cartridge bags, as well as dainty additions to the rations of the soldiers, in which acceptable service they took pride. On January 6th Captain Whiting, a North Carolinian who afterward held the rank of major-general in the Confederate States service, having been notified of the movement of the State troops, returned to Savannah, and on the next day reported to his chief, General Totten, at Washington: This morning I proceeded to Fort Pulaski, which I found occupied by Georgia troops, commanded by Colonel Lawton. I was received with great civility, and informed by him that he held possession of all the government pro
January 10th (search for this): chapter 1
s in arms, subject to the orders of the United States, must be withdrawn. The arsenal, situated near Augusta, consisting of a group of buildings on the summits of salubrious sand-hills, contained a battery of artillery, 20,000 stand of muskets, and a large quantity of munitions, guarded by a company of United States troops under command of Capt. Arnold Elzey, of Maryland. The occupation of this arsenal was necessary. The sentiment favoring the seizure was increased by the arrival, on January 10th, of an ordnance detachment, which had been ordered by Col. H. K. Craig, chief of ordnance at Washington, to report at that place after it had been ejected from the Charleston arsenal by the State authorities of South Carolina. Captain Elzey, in his report to Washington of the transfer, said: This movement on the part of Colonel Craig I believe to be wholly unauthorized by the war department. It was injudicious and impolitic, added much to the excitement in Augusta, and was very nigh
January 23rd (search for this): chapter 1
ter, the people believing it to be a reinforcement to my command. I had no previous knowledge of it whatever. On January 23d, Governor Brown, accompanied by his aide-de-camp, Hon. Henry R. Jackson, who had experienced military life as a colonethe following complete report of the surrender of the United States arsenal at Augusta, Ga.: On the morning of the 23d of January I received from the governor of Georgia, then in Augusta, backed by a superior force of State troops numbering some 6ry respectfully, your obedient servant, Henry R. Jackson, Aide-de-Camp, etc. About 1 o'clock on the night of the 23d of January, I received from the war department the following reply to my telegram: Capt. Arnold Elzey, Second Artillery, CommChief of the Army of the State of Georgia. Arnold Elzey, Captain Second Artillery, Commanding Augusta Arsenal. On January 23d, when Captain Elzey's answer remained in doubt, some 8000 volunteers of the city were put under arms, and others came
January 28th (search for this): chapter 1
nce of Captain Whiting, refused to recognize Colonel Lawton's authority, or to allow Lieutenant Bassinger to interfere with the barracks or public property, but had no force to sustain his action, and on the 26th, Bassinger, with the assistance of the city police, fastened up the public store-room and took possession of the barracks. Sergeant Burt consistently maintained his position by refusing to have any official communication with Lieutenant Bassinger. Upon Captain Whiting's return, January 28th, Colonel Lawton addressed him the following letter: Sir: I am instructed by the governor and commander-in-chief of the State of Georgia to take possession of Oglethorpe barracks, in the name of the State of Georgia, and in your absence from this city possession has been taken. The occupants will not be disturbed at present, and you will please consider yourself at liberty to occupy, with your employes, such apartments as are necessary for your convenience while you are closing up you
January 29th (search for this): chapter 1
ere taken in hand by Colonel Lawton, two of which were advertised for sale, when information was received that the guns were on the way, whereupon they were released. This incident was brought to a close after the State had united with the Confederate States, and the fact that Governor Brown retained the matter in his own hands is a striking illustration of the vigorous way in which Georgia put into effect the principle of State sovereignty. The convention, prior to the adjournment on January 29th to meet in March at Savannah, authorized the equipment of two regiments, to be either all infantry, or artil-lety and infantry, as the governor should decide. The organization of these regiments had not been completed when active hostilities began, and the companies formed were consolidated in one regiment, and turned over to the Confederate States government with the title of the First regiment Georgia regulars. Of this regiment, Charles J. Williams was commissioned colonel, March 5, 1
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