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roying every bridge on their proposed route, it would have produced no important effect upon Mitchel's military operations, and that he would not have taken, certainly would not have held, Chattanooga. . . . Hence, concludes the officer, it is my opinion that Mitchel's bridge burners took desperate chances to accomplish objects of no substantial advantage. In the same month of April, the Third Georgia infantry, Col. A. R. Wright, was distinguished in the fight at South Mills, N. C., on the 19th. The regiment had been withdrawn from Roanoke island in time to escape inevitable capture, and now met the Federals as they advanced northward along the Pasquotank river. With three companies of his regiment and a battery, Wright selected an advantageous position, and finding a deep, wide ditch in his front, adopted the novel expedient of filling it with fence rails and burning them to make the ditch impassable, or at least not available as an intrenchment. Before the enemy arrived Wright
January 2nd (search for this): chapter 5
l dead in their front at 650. The punishment of the Federals was appalling to them, and served to postpone the fall of Vicksburg for half a year. In his official report General Barton mentioned with praise the services of Cols. Abda Johnson (wounded), Henderson and Phillips, Lieutenant-Colonel Bell (wounded), and Maj. Henry C. Kellogg, of the same regiment, and Capts. T. B. Lyons and Patterson of his staff. In the sanguinary struggle at Murfreesboro, or Stone's river, December 31st to January 2d, Gen. John K. Jackson's brigade, of Breckinridge's division, which included the Fifth regiment of infantry and the Second Georgia battalion of sharpshooters, was in various parts of the field at different stages of the battle, but experienced all its severe loss in the brief space from noon to three in the afternoon of December 31st, when it was sent by Breckinridge to join in the assault upon the Federal center. Jackson twice charged the enemy's strong position, but for the want of suppo
January 15th (search for this): chapter 5
for the prompt, cordial and effective co-operation you have afforded me in the effort to defend our common country against the common enemy. In December, 1861, the general assembly had authorized and instructed the governor to tender to the Confederate government the volunteer forces called into service under the law of 1860, in companies, battalions, regiments, brigades or divisions, as might be acceptable to the Confederate war department, provided the tender was made before the 15th of January following, and should be consented to by the troops. The question of transfer was submitted to the troops and decided in the negative almost unanimously. This was previous to the conscript act. When that became a law, Governor Brown immediately tendered the State army to Brigadier-General Lawton, commanding the military district of Georgia, Maj.-Gen. Henry R. Jackson, commander of the State army, having retired in order to prevent any embarrassment. Both the governor and General Jack
was at Corinth during the siege by Halleck. The proximity of the Federal forces to the northern part of the State in the spring of 1862, was made manifest by the famous exploit of the Andrews raiders. This expedition was set on foot early in April at the suggestion of James J. Andrews, who had been for some time in the service of General Buell as a spy. Twenty-four men were detailed from Ohio regiments for Andrews' expedition, the place of one of whom was taken by a civilian, William Cawould not have taken, certainly would not have held, Chattanooga. . . . Hence, concludes the officer, it is my opinion that Mitchel's bridge burners took desperate chances to accomplish objects of no substantial advantage. In the same month of April, the Third Georgia infantry, Col. A. R. Wright, was distinguished in the fight at South Mills, N. C., on the 19th. The regiment had been withdrawn from Roanoke island in time to escape inevitable capture, and now met the Federals as they advanc
rt Pulaski throughout the summer, Brig.-Gen. A. H. Terry was in command, with a garrison consisting of the Forty-eighth New York, Col. W. B. Barton; a company of Rhode Island artillery, and a detachment of engineers. General Hunter had ordered in May that in consequence of an alleged violation of flag of truce by a Confederate command, all parties coming to his lines on any pretense whatever should be held. On August 10th the Confederate steamer General Lee came down from Savannah under flagher said the colonel: No officer in this regiment now doubts that the key to the successful prosecution of this war lies in the unlimited employment of black troops. On September 30th a reconnaissance was made by several New York companies up the May river from Fort Pulaski, which resulted in the destruction of some valuable salt works at Crowell's plantation, above Bluffton. Colonel Barton, commanding, reported that he stopped at the latter place on his return and carried off a considerable
out bloodshed and carnage. In the campaign under Bragg through Kentucky and Tennessee, undertaken to protect Chattanooga and Atlanta by carrying the war into the enemy's country, or in that direction, some of the Georgia troops acted a gallant and conspicuous part. The First regiment of partisan rangers, Col. A. A. Hunt, participated in the first Kentucky raid of that famous cavalry leader, John H. Morgan, then colonel of the Second Kentucky cavalry. At Tompkinsville, on the night of July 8th, a considerable body of the enemy's cavalry was charged and stampeded; but Colonel Hunt, while leading gallantly in the assault, received a severe wound in the leg, which prevented his going on with the command. Morgan and his men pushed on to Georgetown, and on the 17th captured Cynthiana, with 420 prisoners. The Georgia troopers, under command of Lieut.-Col. F. M. Nix, acted a prominent part in this brilliant affair; Captain Jones, of Company A, and Maj. Samuel J. Winn being especially d
July 13th (search for this): chapter 5
this brilliant affair; Captain Jones, of Company A, and Maj. Samuel J. Winn being especially distinguished among the officers. At the same time the First and Second Georgia cavalry regiments were earning their spurs with Forrest in Tennessee. Part of the First, under Col. J. J. Morrison, and the Second, under Col. W. J. Lawton, with Colonel Wharton's Texas rangers, formed the main part of the cavalry brigade of about 1,400, with which Forrest attacked an equal force at Murfreesboro on July 13th and captured the entire Federal command. To Colonel Morrison, with a portion of his regiment, was given the duty of storming the courthouse, and after two or three hours of brisk fighting he compelled its surrender. Lieut.-Col. Arthur Hood, with a portion of the First, stormed the jail with equal success. Colonel Lawton, with the Second regiment and the Tennessee and Kentucky companies, assailed the second camp of the enemy. Said Forrest: The Georgians, under Colonel Dunlop and Maj
July 31st (search for this): chapter 5
side, and the larger guns were so arranged that both the 7-inch and one of the 6-inch guns could be worked on either broadside. The Georgia was of a different construction, 250 feet long and 60 feet in beam, with a casemate 12 feet high. Her machinery was defective, and it was necessary to tow her where needed. She carried seven guns and was under the command of Lieut. J. Pembroke Jones. The Atlanta, under command of Lieut. Charles H. McBlair, made a trial trip toward Fort Pulaski on July 31st and created much consternation in the Federal fleet. A Northern newspaper correspondent wrote that unless some monitor should come to the rescue, the fair-weather yachts now reposing on the placid bosom of Port Royal bay have before them an excellent opportunity of learning what it is to be blown out of the water. But there was no direct benefit to be derived from the Atlanta, as her trial trip showed that her alteration in form and the projecting overway caused her to steer badly, and
hereafter only one officer should accompany a flag of truce. In July, 1862, the armed cruiser Nashville ran the blockade into Savannah with a cargo of arms. This vessel was the first commissioned armed cruiser of the Confederate States, and had been purchased with the original intention of using her to convey abroad the commissioners, Mason and Slidell. After she entered the river in the summer of 1862, the rigor of the blockade kept her useless until her destruction, early in 1863. In August the steamer Emma, which had several times run the blockade, carrying cotton to Nassau, while trying to make the outward passage on a dark and stormy night, ran aground off the southeast extremity of Jones island. The crew got off in boats and made their escape up the river to Savannah, though pursued for some distance by boats from Fort Pulaski. Before leaving the vessel the crew set her on fire, and she was totally consumed. It was thought by the Federals that her intention was to go to
August 10th (search for this): chapter 5
C) of Ramsey's First Georgia, was also at the battle of Perryville. At Fort Pulaski throughout the summer, Brig.-Gen. A. H. Terry was in command, with a garrison consisting of the Forty-eighth New York, Col. W. B. Barton; a company of Rhode Island artillery, and a detachment of engineers. General Hunter had ordered in May that in consequence of an alleged violation of flag of truce by a Confederate command, all parties coming to his lines on any pretense whatever should be held. On August 10th the Confederate steamer General Lee came down from Savannah under flag of truce, carrying a lady and her son who desired to go north. The Lee was ordered to anchor, and upon her failure to do so was fired upon by Fort Pulaski, but without effect. A small armed steamer was sent after her, and she was brought back to the fort. General Hunter ordered from Hilton Head, Put the officers and crew of the rebel steamer in close confinement in the fort. On the following day the boat and crew w
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