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Browsing named entities in James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans).

Found 4,000 total hits in 1,141 results.

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Hartford (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
welve screw-sloops of two classes were built, most of which were admirable vessels, though they were wanting, with a few exceptions, in the important quality of speed. The first class, vessels of about two thousand tons, included the Lancaster, Hartford, Richmond, Brooklyn, and Pensacola. The second class, of which the Pawnee and Iroquois were the largest, were also serviceable vessels. Finally, in February, 1861, Congress had made appropriation for seven new screw-sloops, which were intendes, whose disposition on the 4th of March was as follows: *** Class.Name.Station. One screw-frigateNiagaraReturning from Japan. Five screw-sloops (1st class).San JacintoCoast of Africa. LancasterPacific. BrooklynHome Squadron (Pensacola). HartfordEast Indies. RichmondMediterranean. Three side-wheel steamersSusquehanna.Mediterranean. PowhatanHome Squadron (returning from VeraCruz). SaranacPacific. Eight screw-sloops (2d class).MohicanCoast of Africa. NarragansettPacific. IroquoisMed
Narragansett (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
emained twenty-four steamers, whose disposition on the 4th of March was as follows: *** Class.Name.Station. One screw-frigateNiagaraReturning from Japan. Five screw-sloops (1st class).San JacintoCoast of Africa. LancasterPacific. BrooklynHome Squadron (Pensacola). HartfordEast Indies. RichmondMediterranean. Three side-wheel steamersSusquehanna.Mediterranean. PowhatanHome Squadron (returning from VeraCruz). SaranacPacific. Eight screw-sloops (2d class).MohicanCoast of Africa. NarragansettPacific. IroquoisMediterranean. PawneeWashington. WyomingPacific. DacotahEast Indies. PocahontasHome Squadron (returning from. VeraCruz). SeminoleCoast of Brazil. Five screw steamers (3d class)WyandotteHome Squadron (Pensacola). MohawkNew York. CrusaderNew York. SumterCoast of Africa. MysticCoast of Africa. Two side-wheel steamersPulaskiBrazil. SaginawEast Indies. It will be observed that of the twelve vessels composing the Home Squadron, seven were steamers; and of these
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
could not be had either to man the slips that might be commissioned, or to protect the exposed stations at Annapolis and Norfolk. Prompt measures were taken during the first year to increase the force; and later, a great expansion took place. In which to draw reserves. It had no seamen, for its people were not given to seafaring pursuits. Its only shipyards were Norfolk and Pensacola. Norfolk, with its immense supplies of ordnance and equipments, was indeed invaluable; but though the thrNorfolk, with its immense supplies of ordnance and equipments, was indeed invaluable; but though the three hundred new Dahlgren guns captured in the yard were a permanent acquisition, the yard itself was lost when the war was one-fourth over. The South was without any large force of skilled mechanics; and such as it had were early summoned to the armn was seized at Pensacola, and $25,000 were appropriated to complete and equip her. The Merrimac was presently raised at Norfolk, and found to have no serious injury. Encouragement was given to private enterprise, by Davis's immediate adoption of t
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
The operations of the navy were confined to the attack of imperfectly-fortified points on the seaboard, and to blockading a country that had no commercial importance. The Crimean War advanced a step farther. The destruction of the Turkish fleet at Sinope, in 1853, showed the effectiveness of horizontal shell-firing, as invented by Paixhans, while the success of the French ironclads at Kinburn led the way to the practice of casing ships-of-war in armor. In 1858 experiments were made at Portsmouth with the Erebus and Meteor, two lightly-armored floating batteries; and these were followed, in France and in England, by the Gloire and the Warrior, veritable ironclad cruisers. But the new system was still in its experimental stage; and it was left to the war of 1861 to show clearly its practical value. The application of armor to the sides of vessels was accompanied, or rather induced, by improvements in ordnance, especially by the introduction of rifled guns in Europe and of the he
Saginaw (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
PowhatanHome Squadron (returning from VeraCruz). SaranacPacific. Eight screw-sloops (2d class).MohicanCoast of Africa. NarragansettPacific. IroquoisMediterranean. PawneeWashington. WyomingPacific. DacotahEast Indies. PocahontasHome Squadron (returning from. VeraCruz). SeminoleCoast of Brazil. Five screw steamers (3d class)WyandotteHome Squadron (Pensacola). MohawkNew York. CrusaderNew York. SumterCoast of Africa. MysticCoast of Africa. Two side-wheel steamersPulaskiBrazil. SaginawEast Indies. It will be observed that of the twelve vessels composing the Home Squadron, seven were steamers; and of these only three, the Pawnee, Mohawk, and Crusader, were in northern ports and at the immediate disposal of the new administration. The best part of the fleet was scattered all over the world. In the matter of ordnance, as in ships, the navy had been making active progress. In the old sailing vessels, the 32 pounder, which was simply a development of the 18s and 24s
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
or concerted action. The naval force that opposed Goldsborough in the Sounds was pitifully weak, as was that which Dupont found at Port Royal. Little more could be said of the squadron at New Orleans, though the ironclad Mississippi, if accident and mismanagement had not delayed her commission, might have given Farragut's fleet some annoyance. At Mobile the Tennessee, under the gallant Buchanan, fought almost single-handed the whole fleet, only to be captured after a heroic defence. At Savannah, the Atlanta was captured almost as soon as she appeared. Charleston was never able to make more than a raid or two. on the blockading force. The Albemarle maintained herself for six months in the waters of North Carolina, but she was blockaded in the Roanoke River, and was finally destroyed by the daring of Cushing. Finally the Merrimao, which was lost through our own shortcomings, had a brilliant but brief career in Hampton Roads. These isolated attempts comprised, together with th
Russian River (Alaska, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
l, and developed by Fulton, was rejected by the English Government in 1805, because it was recognized as giving an advantage to a weak navy over a powerful one, and its adoption could only impair the maritime supremacy of Great Britain. On account of this advantage which the torpedo gave to the weaker side, it was brought into use by the Russians in the Crimea, and, though none of the allied vessels were destroyed by its agency, it none the less contributed appreciably to the protection of Russian harbors. But its great importance was not established until the Civil War, and then only in the second year. The Confederates took it up for the same reason that the Russians had adopted it in 1854, and the English had rejected it in 1805. Driven by the poverty of their naval resources to the use of every device that ingenuity could suggest, in the fall of 1862 they established a bureau at Richmond to elaborate and systematize torpedo warfare; and the destruction of the Housatonic, the
San Jacinto (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
unserviceable, two of them being still on the stocks, and the others useless except as receiving-ships. Two more were mere tugs, and, together with the Michigan, stationed on the lakes, may be thrown out of the calculation. Eight others, including the five frigates, were laid up in ordinary. There remained twenty-four steamers, whose disposition on the 4th of March was as follows: *** Class.Name.Station. One screw-frigateNiagaraReturning from Japan. Five screw-sloops (1st class).San JacintoCoast of Africa. LancasterPacific. BrooklynHome Squadron (Pensacola). HartfordEast Indies. RichmondMediterranean. Three side-wheel steamersSusquehanna.Mediterranean. PowhatanHome Squadron (returning from VeraCruz). SaranacPacific. Eight screw-sloops (2d class).MohicanCoast of Africa. NarragansettPacific. IroquoisMediterranean. PawneeWashington. WyomingPacific. DacotahEast Indies. PocahontasHome Squadron (returning from. VeraCruz). SeminoleCoast of Brazil. Five screw steame
France (France) (search for this): chapter 2
and to blockading a country that had no commercial importance. The Crimean War advanced a step farther. The destruction of the Turkish fleet at Sinope, in 1853, showed the effectiveness of horizontal shell-firing, as invented by Paixhans, while the success of the French ironclads at Kinburn led the way to the practice of casing ships-of-war in armor. In 1858 experiments were made at Portsmouth with the Erebus and Meteor, two lightly-armored floating batteries; and these were followed, in France and in England, by the Gloire and the Warrior, veritable ironclad cruisers. But the new system was still in its experimental stage; and it was left to the war of 1861 to show clearly its practical value. The application of armor to the sides of vessels was accompanied, or rather induced, by improvements in ordnance, especially by the introduction of rifled guns in Europe and of the heavy cast-iron smooth-bores of Dahlgren in America. Both these improvements, however, were of recent date
Japan (Japan) (search for this): chapter 2
s included in the general list, five were unserviceable, two of them being still on the stocks, and the others useless except as receiving-ships. Two more were mere tugs, and, together with the Michigan, stationed on the lakes, may be thrown out of the calculation. Eight others, including the five frigates, were laid up in ordinary. There remained twenty-four steamers, whose disposition on the 4th of March was as follows: *** Class.Name.Station. One screw-frigateNiagaraReturning from Japan. Five screw-sloops (1st class).San JacintoCoast of Africa. LancasterPacific. BrooklynHome Squadron (Pensacola). HartfordEast Indies. RichmondMediterranean. Three side-wheel steamersSusquehanna.Mediterranean. PowhatanHome Squadron (returning from VeraCruz). SaranacPacific. Eight screw-sloops (2d class).MohicanCoast of Africa. NarragansettPacific. IroquoisMediterranean. PawneeWashington. WyomingPacific. DacotahEast Indies. PocahontasHome Squadron (returning from. VeraCruz). Se
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