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Browsing named entities in James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans).

Found 4,000 total hits in 1,141 results.

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Fort Niagara (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
Of the forty steamers included in the general list, five were unserviceable, two of them being still on the stocks, and the others useless except as receiving-ships. Two more were mere tugs, and, together with the Michigan, stationed on the lakes, may be thrown out of the calculation. Eight others, including the five frigates, were laid up in ordinary. There remained twenty-four steamers, whose disposition on the 4th of March was as follows: *** Class.Name.Station. One screw-frigateNiagaraReturning from Japan. Five screw-sloops (1st class).San JacintoCoast of Africa. LancasterPacific. BrooklynHome Squadron (Pensacola). HartfordEast Indies. RichmondMediterranean. Three side-wheel steamersSusquehanna.Mediterranean. PowhatanHome Squadron (returning from VeraCruz). SaranacPacific. Eight screw-sloops (2d class).MohicanCoast of Africa. NarragansettPacific. IroquoisMediterranean. PawneeWashington. WyomingPacific. DacotahEast Indies. PocahontasHome Squadron (returning
Tybee Island (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
.Mediterranean. PowhatanHome Squadron (returning from VeraCruz). SaranacPacific. Eight screw-sloops (2d class).MohicanCoast of Africa. NarragansettPacific. IroquoisMediterranean. PawneeWashington. WyomingPacific. DacotahEast Indies. PocahontasHome Squadron (returning from. VeraCruz). SeminoleCoast of Brazil. Five screw steamers (3d class)WyandotteHome Squadron (Pensacola). MohawkNew York. CrusaderNew York. SumterCoast of Africa. MysticCoast of Africa. Two side-wheel steamersPulaskiBrazil. SaginawEast Indies. It will be observed that of the twelve vessels composing the Home Squadron, seven were steamers; and of these only three, the Pawnee, Mohawk, and Crusader, were in northern ports and at the immediate disposal of the new administration. The best part of the fleet was scattered all over the world. In the matter of ordnance, as in ships, the navy had been making active progress. In the old sailing vessels, the 32 pounder, which was simply a development of
Brazil, Clay County, Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
SaranacPacific. Eight screw-sloops (2d class).MohicanCoast of Africa. NarragansettPacific. IroquoisMediterranean. PawneeWashington. WyomingPacific. DacotahEast Indies. PocahontasHome Squadron (returning from. VeraCruz). SeminoleCoast of Brazil. Five screw steamers (3d class)WyandotteHome Squadron (Pensacola). MohawkNew York. CrusaderNew York. SumterCoast of Africa. MysticCoast of Africa. Two side-wheel steamersPulaskiBrazil. SaginawEast Indies. It will be observed that of thBrazil. SaginawEast Indies. It will be observed that of the twelve vessels composing the Home Squadron, seven were steamers; and of these only three, the Pawnee, Mohawk, and Crusader, were in northern ports and at the immediate disposal of the new administration. The best part of the fleet was scattered all over the world. In the matter of ordnance, as in ships, the navy had been making active progress. In the old sailing vessels, the 32 pounder, which was simply a development of the 18s and 24s of 1812, and the Viii-inch shell-gun were still the
Kearsarge (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
1861, 79 steamers and 58 sailing vessels, 137 in all. The number of vessels bought during the whole war amounted to 418, of which 313 were steamers. After the war was over, they were rapidly sold, at less than half their cost. The second measure adopted by the administration was the construction of sloops-of-war. Seven of these had been authorized by Congress in February, but the Department resolved to build eight, assigning two to each navy yard. Four of these vessels, the Oneida. Kearsarge, Wachusett, and Tuscarora, were reproductions of three of the sloops of 1858, which made the work of construction quicker and easier, the designs being already prepared. In the latter part of 1861, eight additional sloops were built, of the same general class, but larger. All these fourteen sloops, like their models of two years before, were excellent vessels, and several of them are still in the service as second-rates and third-rates. The third measure adopted by the Department, on
Pawnee City (Nebraska, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
tion on the 4th of March was as follows: *** Class.Name.Station. One screw-frigateNiagaraReturning from Japan. Five screw-sloops (1st class).San JacintoCoast of Africa. LancasterPacific. BrooklynHome Squadron (Pensacola). HartfordEast Indies. RichmondMediterranean. Three side-wheel steamersSusquehanna.Mediterranean. PowhatanHome Squadron (returning from VeraCruz). SaranacPacific. Eight screw-sloops (2d class).MohicanCoast of Africa. NarragansettPacific. IroquoisMediterranean. PawneeWashington. WyomingPacific. DacotahEast Indies. PocahontasHome Squadron (returning from. VeraCruz). SeminoleCoast of Brazil. Five screw steamers (3d class)WyandotteHome Squadron (Pensacola). MohawkNew York. CrusaderNew York. SumterCoast of Africa. MysticCoast of Africa. Two side-wheel steamersPulaskiBrazil. SaginawEast Indies. It will be observed that of the twelve vessels composing the Home Squadron, seven were steamers; and of these only three, the Pawnee, Mohawk, and Crusad
Mexico (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
rs of actual fighting. Modern naval warfare was therefore almost a new art to the officers that were called in 1861 into active service. The long period of profound peace that followed the wars of Napoleon had been broken only by the war with Mexico in 1846, the Crimean War in 1854, and the Franco-Austrian War in 1859. None of these was marked by naval operations on any important scale, and such operations as there were indicated but faintly the coming development. In the contest with MexiMexico, steamers were used in war for the first time; but the enemy was so destitute of naval resources that their overwhelming importance was not fully recognized. The operations of the navy were confined to the attack of imperfectly-fortified points on the seaboard, and to blockading a country that had no commercial importance. The Crimean War advanced a step farther. The destruction of the Turkish fleet at Sinope, in 1853, showed the effectiveness of horizontal shell-firing, as invented by Pai
Mohawk (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ragansettPacific. IroquoisMediterranean. PawneeWashington. WyomingPacific. DacotahEast Indies. PocahontasHome Squadron (returning from. VeraCruz). SeminoleCoast of Brazil. Five screw steamers (3d class)WyandotteHome Squadron (Pensacola). MohawkNew York. CrusaderNew York. SumterCoast of Africa. MysticCoast of Africa. Two side-wheel steamersPulaskiBrazil. SaginawEast Indies. It will be observed that of the twelve vessels composing the Home Squadron, seven were steamers; and of these only three, the Pawnee, Mohawk, and Crusader, were in northern ports and at the immediate disposal of the new administration. The best part of the fleet was scattered all over the world. In the matter of ordnance, as in ships, the navy had been making active progress. In the old sailing vessels, the 32 pounder, which was simply a development of the 18s and 24s of 1812, and the Viii-inch shell-gun were still the usual guns. Since 1850, the powerful Dahlgren smooth-bore shell-guns had b
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
the larger steamers were fast vessels and made efficient cruisers. The Connecticut, the Cuyler, the De Soto, and the Santiago de Cuba paid for their cost several times over in the prizes they captured. The majority of the purchased steamers were between one hundred and eight hundred tons. Some of the least promising of these improvised men-of-war did good service against blockade-runners. The steamer Circassian, one of the most valuable prizes made during the war, was captured outside of Havana by a Fulton ferry-boat. Even for fighting purposes, however, the ferry-boats, with their heavy guns, were by no means to be despised. There were purchased altogether up to December, 1861, 79 steamers and 58 sailing vessels, 137 in all. The number of vessels bought during the whole war amounted to 418, of which 313 were steamers. After the war was over, they were rapidly sold, at less than half their cost. The second measure adopted by the administration was the construction of sloops-o
Tuscarora (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
sailing vessels, 137 in all. The number of vessels bought during the whole war amounted to 418, of which 313 were steamers. After the war was over, they were rapidly sold, at less than half their cost. The second measure adopted by the administration was the construction of sloops-of-war. Seven of these had been authorized by Congress in February, but the Department resolved to build eight, assigning two to each navy yard. Four of these vessels, the Oneida. Kearsarge, Wachusett, and Tuscarora, were reproductions of three of the sloops of 1858, which made the work of construction quicker and easier, the designs being already prepared. In the latter part of 1861, eight additional sloops were built, of the same general class, but larger. All these fourteen sloops, like their models of two years before, were excellent vessels, and several of them are still in the service as second-rates and third-rates. The third measure adopted by the Department, on its own responsibility, wi
Susquehanna, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
he importance of steam as a motive power had become established, the early side-wheelers were built,—first the Mississippi and Missouri, and later the Powhatan, Susquehanna, and Saranac. The Powhatan and Susquehanna, at the time they were launched, in 1850, were the most efficient naval vessels afloat. Next came the six screw-friSusquehanna, at the time they were launched, in 1850, were the most efficient naval vessels afloat. Next came the six screw-frigates, which were built in 1855, and were regarded all the world over as the model men-of-war of the period. Of these the largest was the Niagara. The other five, the Roanoke, Colorado, Merrimac, Minnesota, and Wabash, were vessels of a little over three thousand tons, and they carried, for their day, a powerful battery. Again, lass).San JacintoCoast of Africa. LancasterPacific. BrooklynHome Squadron (Pensacola). HartfordEast Indies. RichmondMediterranean. Three side-wheel steamersSusquehanna.Mediterranean. PowhatanHome Squadron (returning from VeraCruz). SaranacPacific. Eight screw-sloops (2d class).MohicanCoast of Africa. NarragansettPacific.
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