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al Price received a severe wound in the action, but would neither retire from the field nor cease to expose his life to danger. After the battle of Elkhorn, Price received his commission as major-general in the Confederate army, dated the day before that battle. Shortly after the battle of Shiloh, General Price with his Missourians accompanied Van Dorn to the east of the Mississippi, and after Bragg had departed for Kentucky they were left to face greatly superior numbers under Grant and Rosecrans. At Iuka and Corinth he and his men fought with great valor. The year 1863 found Price again in the Trans-Mississippi. But he was always under the orders of others, some of whom were inferior to himself in ability. At Helena, on July 4, 1863, Price's men were the only part of the army that carried the enemy's works. He co-operated with Kirby Smith in the campaign against Banks and Steele in 1864. General Price made his last desperate effort to recover Missouri in the latter part of 1
John Sappington Marmaduke (search for this): chapter 21
gadier-general. He served with honor in company with such dashing leaders as Marmaduke and Shelby. After the war he returned to his home and resumed the practice oaround the hearts of his troops, but of all who knew him. Major-General John Sappington Marmaduke Major-General John Sappington Marmaduke was born near Arrow RMajor-General John Sappington Marmaduke was born near Arrow Rock, Mo., on March 14, 1833. Brought up on his father's farm, with such preparation as he could get in country schools, he entered Yale college at the age of seventove he was warmly commended by General Hindman, who noted in his report that Marmaduke had apparently not been confirmed as brigadier, and declared that if the highuel with Brig.-Gen. L. M. Walker, which resulted in the death of the latter. Marmaduke was put in arrest, but was ordered to resume command during pending operationerry he rendered important services. In recognition of his valuable services Marmaduke was made a major-general, though his commission was not received until March
taunch allegiance to the cause as to merit the extraordinary honor of the thanks of Congress. By a joint resolution, approved May 23, 1864, it was resolved, That the thanks of Congress are eminently due, and are hereby tendered, to Brig.-Gen. F. M. Cockrell, and the officers and soldiers composing the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth regiments of Missouri infantry, First, Second and Third regiments of Missouri cavalry, the batteries of Bledsoe, Landis, Guibor, Walsh, Dawson and Barret, and Woodson's detached company, all in the service of the Confederacy, east of the Mississippi river, for the prompt renewal of their pledges of fidelity to the cause of Southern independence for forty years, unless independence and peace, without curtailment of boundaries, shall be sooner secured. With these Missouri troops he moved with Polk's army to the support of Johnson against Sherman, reaching Kingston, Ga., May 17th, after which French's division was under fire every day with one
John B. Hood (search for this): chapter 21
, and made a spirited and successful attack upon the Federal works south of Jonesboro, on September 6th, driving three times their own number from strong skirmish works. In the following winter he participated in the Tennessee campaign under General Hood, until the fatal field of Franklin, when he was one of the twelve Confederate generals killed, wounded or captured. While gallantly leading his men in the face of a terrific fire, he received three wounds, in one arm and both legs, the bone ohe right, but was soon sent to the support of Jackson. On the way being asked for help by Gen. D. H. Hill, Walker sent him the Twenty-seventh North Carolina and the Third Arkansas, and hurried on with the rest of his force and, quickly forming on Hood's left, made sure Confederate victory in that part of the field. He was promoted to major-general November 8, 1862, and was now called upon to bid farewell to the army of Northern Virginia, and go to a new field in the Trans-Mississippi, where h
William M. Price (search for this): chapter 21
ge of Vicksburg. In command of his company of Missouri militia he and they fought like veterans under the command of General Price at the important battles of Carthage, Wilson's Creek and the siege of Lexington, in 1861, and at Elkhorn Tavern in March, 1862. With Price's army he crossed the Mississippi about the time of the battle of Shiloh, and after that date his military services were mainly rendered east of that river, fighting for the Confederacy, though his own State had fallen into ted. A similar scene occurred next day. It was the capture of this camp and the scenes that accompanied it that drove General Price and many others, who up to that time had been staunch Union men, into the ranks of the secessionists, thus inauguratifore this battle (March 3, 1862), Frost was commissioned brigadier-general. When the army of the West under Van Dorn and Price crossed the Mississippi in April, 1862, General Frost went with them. On May 8th General Bragg appointed him inspector-g
ending operations, and subsequently was formally released by General Holmes. On October 25, 1863, he attacked Pine Bluff with his division, but without success. At the opening of the Red river campaign, 1864, he held the line of the Ouachita, scouring the country in front to within 25 miles of Little Rock, and when Steele advanced to co-operate with Banks he harassed and delayed the Federal movement from the north to Camden to such an extent as to make it ineffectual, fighting gallantly at Elkin's ferry, April 2d, 3d and 4th, and at Prairie d'ane, April 9th. On the 18th he won the brilliant action at Poison Spring, and at Jenkins' ferry he rendered important services. In recognition of his valuable services Marmaduke was made a major-general, though his commission was not received until March 17, 1865. In May and June, 1864, he was stationed on the Mississippi, and had a creditable encounter with A. J. Smith at Lake Village. With Sterling Price on the great Missouri raid of 186
Joseph O. Shelby (search for this): chapter 21
the 29th of September, 1867. Brigadier-General Joseph O. Shelby Brigadier-General Joseph O. SBrigadier-General Joseph O. Shelby was born at Lexington, Ky., in 1831, of a family prominent in the early history of Kentucky anpart of the State. From this time forward General Shelby was actively engaged in every campaign of Little Rock and Devall's Bluff. He then gives Shelby's report in full. We quote a part of it: The deral force, which did not attack him, because Shelby's skillful movements had caused them to greatlin the campaigns in Arkansas and Missouri. General Shelby's generous disposition, careful regard forurrender had been made and the army disbanded, Shelby gathered about him 600 men, for the most part nia and General Lyon of Kentucky. In 1867 General Shelby returned to the United States and to his f he had shown during his military career. General Shelby in private life commanded the love and estly missed at these yearly gatherings than Joseph O. Shelby, the gallant western military leader. Hi
forty years, unless independence and peace, without curtailment of boundaries, shall be sooner secured. With these Missouri troops he moved with Polk's army to the support of Johnson against Sherman, reaching Kingston, Ga., May 17th, after which French's division was under fire every day with one exception, until the fall of Atlanta. At Lost Mountain, General French reported his thanks to General Cockrell, his officers and men, for their gallant conduct in repulsing the enemy, adding that whatGeneral French reported his thanks to General Cockrell, his officers and men, for their gallant conduct in repulsing the enemy, adding that whatever credit was due for the complete repulse of the Federal assault in this fierce engagement belonged exclusively to Cockrell's brigade and part of Barry's. Soon afterward General Cockrell was again wounded, but he resumed command August 8th, and was in constant skirmishing on the Atlanta lines until the evacuation. After marching, as rear guard of his corps, to the vicinity of Jonesboro, he was with his brigade under a destructive fire at Lovejoy's Station, and made a spirited and successful
John Bulloch Clark (search for this): chapter 21
ed, and went to Raymond, Miss., where he died from sickness contracted during the siege, July 16, 1863. Brigadier-General John B. Clark, Jr. There were two John B. Clarks; the father, brigadier-general of the Missouri State Guard; the son, a bren he resumed his law practice at Fayette, where he resided at the time of his death, October 29, 1895. His son John Bulloch Clark, Jr., was born at Fayette, January 14, 11831. After attending the preparatory schools he entered the Missouri univer graduated in 1854. Seven years later the great event which broke into the peaceful pursuits of so many men aroused young Clark to a new and stirring life. Being the son of such a father, he could but be profoundly moved by the sentiment which so qeneral Hindman, in his report of operations in Missouri and Arkansas, mentioned in terms of highest commendation Col. John B. Clark, Jr. After he had long been acting with ability in command of a brigade, on March 8, 1864, he was commissioned by th
mainly rendered east of that river, fighting for the Confederacy, though his own State had fallen into the hands of the enemy. He was with the army at Corinth, and on the retreat to Tupelo, and in the subsequent aggressive movements fought with Hebert's division in command of his regiment. At the October battle of Corinth, he was painfully wounded by a fragment of shell, but remained in the field and at Hatchie Bridge was distinguished for cool conduct in defending the rear-guard. In the sprter which was fought the bloody battle of Corinth, in which the three Missouri regiments of his brigade, the Fourth and Sixth infantry and Third cavalry, lost 443 killed, wounded and missing. On the second day, and at Hatchie bridge, he commanded Hebert's division, took an important part in the fight and the protection of the retreat and was commended by General Price. When Grant crossed the Mississippi below Vicksburg, Green, commanding a brigade of Bowen's division, marched with part of his m
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