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eaker of the house. In 1844 he was elected to Congress and served until the opening of the war with Mexico, when he raised a regiment and had an independent command in New Mexico and Chihuahua. He gained victories over greatly superior forces at Cancada, Lambonda and Taos. In this latter battle with 300 men he captured 1,500 prisoners. For these services President Polk appointed him a brigadier-general. Moving next against Chihuahua, at Santa Cruz de Rosales, he captured the army of General Trias, double his own. This was really the last battle of the war; for a treaty of peace between the United States and Mexico had been signed a short time before. At the next State election General Price was elected governor of Missouri by a majority of 15,000 votes. Upon the election of Abraham Lincoln as president, Missouri called a convention of which Price was elected president. He was at the time an ardent Union man, and at the first there was not a secessionist in that body. But when
of the battle thus speaks: Brig.-Gens. B. R. Johnson and Bowen, most meritorious officers, were also severely wounded in the first combat, but it is hoped will soon be able to return to duty with their brigades. When in 1863 Grant crossed the Mississippi and landed at Bruinsburg, General Bowen, though fearfully outnumbered, threw himself in his path and with the utmost courage and determination, resisted his advance. After a patriotic sacrifice he was forced back upon the main army under Pemberton. On the 25th of May he was rewarded for his brave work at Port Gibson by the commission of major-general in the army of the Confederate States. He fought with distinction in the other battles outside of Vicksburg, and in all the fighting and suffering of the long siege he and his men had their full share. At the fall of the city he was paroled, and went to Raymond, Miss., where he died from sickness contracted during the siege, July 16, 1863. Brigadier-General John B. Clark, Jr. T
Colton Greene (search for this): chapter 21
able body of the enemy at Hartville, compelling by his maneuvers the withdrawal of General Blunt's army to Springfield and the destruction of a long chain of forts. In April he made a more formidable expedition, leading the cavalrymen of Shelby, Greene, Carter and Burbridge to Cape Girardeau. He defeated the Federals at Taylor's Creek May 11th, and commanded the heroic brigades of Shelby and Greene in the attack on Helena, July 4, 1863, his part of the action failing for want of support. DuriGreene in the attack on Helena, July 4, 1863, his part of the action failing for want of support. During Price's defense of Little Rock he commanded the cavalry of the army, which, fighting as the rear guard, was reported as skillfully handled and behaved admirably. At this time occurred his duel with Brig.-Gen. L. M. Walker, which resulted in the death of the latter. Marmaduke was put in arrest, but was ordered to resume command during pending operations, and subsequently was formally released by General Holmes. On October 25, 1863, he attacked Pine Bluff with his division, but without succe
ayed such staunch allegiance to the cause as to merit the extraordinary honor of the thanks of Congress. By a joint resolution, approved May 23, 1864, it was resolved, That the thanks of Congress are eminently due, and are hereby tendered, to Brig.-Gen. F. M. Cockrell, and the officers and soldiers composing the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth regiments of Missouri infantry, First, Second and Third regiments of Missouri cavalry, the batteries of Bledsoe, Landis, Guibor, Walsh, Dawson and Barret, and Woodson's detached company, all in the service of the Confederacy, east of the Mississippi river, for the prompt renewal of their pledges of fidelity to the cause of Southern independence for forty years, unless independence and peace, without curtailment of boundaries, shall be sooner secured. With these Missouri troops he moved with Polk's army to the support of Johnson against Sherman, reaching Kingston, Ga., May 17th, after which French's division was under fire every da
F. M. Cockrell (search for this): chapter 21
re every day with one exception, until the fall of Atlanta. At Lost Mountain, General French reported his thanks to General Cockrell, his officers and men, for their gallant conduct in repulsing the enemy, adding that whatever credit was due for the complete repulse of the Federal assault in this fierce engagement belonged exclusively to Cockrell's brigade and part of Barry's. Soon afterward General Cockrell was again wounded, but he resumed command August 8th, and was in constant skirmishing oGeneral Cockrell was again wounded, but he resumed command August 8th, and was in constant skirmishing on the Atlanta lines until the evacuation. After marching, as rear guard of his corps, to the vicinity of Jonesboro, he was with his brigade under a destructive fire at Lovejoy's Station, and made a spirited and successful attack upon the Federal woApril 9, 1865. He was sent as a prisoner of war to Fort Gaines, and paroled six weeks later. Returning to his home General Cockrell resumed his life as a lawyer, and took a prominent part in public affairs, though never accepting office until in 18
. He was at once made major of cavalry in the regular army of the Confederate States, his commission being dated from March 16, 1861. He soon became lieutenant-colonel, then colonel and in September, 1861, was assigned to command of a brigade in Virginia, comprising the First Arkansas, Second Tennessee, and Twelfth North Carolina infantry. Not long afterward he was promoted to brigadiergen-eral. He served under General Holmes in the Aquia district and the department of North Carolina When Lee marched against Pope, he was placed in charge of a division and left with three other division commanders, R. H. Anderson, Lafayette McLaws and D. H. Hill, to watch McClellan's movements in the neighborhood of Westover. As soon as it was certain that the whole Federal army had been withdrawn to the defense of Washington City, these three divisions rejoined the army of Northern Virginia for the invasion of Maryland. Walker led his division to the support of Jackson at Harper's Ferry, and was
Mosby Monroe Parsons (search for this): chapter 21
of the State. He died at Jefferson City, December 28, 1887. Brigadier-General Mosby Monroe Parsons Brigadier-General Mosby Monroe Parsons was born in Virginia Brigadier-General Mosby Monroe Parsons was born in Virginia in 1819. Early in life he removed to Cole county, Mo., where he studied law and began its practice. From 1853 to 1857 he was attorney-general of Missouri and subseqn the 5th of November, 1862. When Banks began his Red river campaign in 1864, Parsons was sent to reinforce the army under Dick Taylor. He reached Mansfield just agn, in which the Confederates recovered large parts of Louisiana and Arkansas, Parsons' command added new fame to that already acquired. Parsons was with General PrParsons was with General Price in his last great march through Arkansas and Missouri and shared in all the marches, hardships and battles of that trying campaign. At the close of the war GeneGeneral Parsons went to Mexico and joined the republican forces in their war against Maximilian. He was killed in an engagement with the imperial forces at Camargo, Mex
Lafayette McLaws (search for this): chapter 21
. He soon became lieutenant-colonel, then colonel and in September, 1861, was assigned to command of a brigade in Virginia, comprising the First Arkansas, Second Tennessee, and Twelfth North Carolina infantry. Not long afterward he was promoted to brigadiergen-eral. He served under General Holmes in the Aquia district and the department of North Carolina When Lee marched against Pope, he was placed in charge of a division and left with three other division commanders, R. H. Anderson, Lafayette McLaws and D. H. Hill, to watch McClellan's movements in the neighborhood of Westover. As soon as it was certain that the whole Federal army had been withdrawn to the defense of Washington City, these three divisions rejoined the army of Northern Virginia for the invasion of Maryland. Walker led his division to the support of Jackson at Harper's Ferry, and was directed to seize Loudoun Heights. This he did, and after the surrender of Harper's Ferry marched with the other divisions of Jackso
John Q. Burbridge (search for this): chapter 21
or the Second Missouri infantry, mustered in as Company H. At the reorganization of this command in May, 1862, the regimental vote was a tie between him and Colonel Burbridge for the chief command, and Burbridge was continued as colonel, and Cockrell promoted to lieutenant-colonel. Six weeks later the latter was promoted colonel,Burbridge was continued as colonel, and Cockrell promoted to lieutenant-colonel. Six weeks later the latter was promoted colonel, the rank he held until after the siege of Vicksburg. In command of his company of Missouri militia he and they fought like veterans under the command of General Price at the important battles of Carthage, Wilson's Creek and the siege of Lexington, in 1861, and at Elkhorn Tavern in March, 1862. With Price's army he crossed the Mito Springfield and the destruction of a long chain of forts. In April he made a more formidable expedition, leading the cavalrymen of Shelby, Greene, Carter and Burbridge to Cape Girardeau. He defeated the Federals at Taylor's Creek May 11th, and commanded the heroic brigades of Shelby and Greene in the attack on Helena, July 4,
Sterling Price (search for this): chapter 21
hern cause, near Paris, Mo., and joined Gen. Sterling Price. He was one of that general's most tru be as well protected as the men in the fort. Price agreed to the plan. The fort was successfully1862, Green's brigade followed the fortunes of Price. They did not get across in time to particip separate command, but generally serving under Price. He rendered important service at the battle o that already acquired. Parsons was with General Price in his last great march through Arkansas aed, with Sterling Price as major-general. General Price still attempted to preserve the peace of Mthe blood of the Missourians unnecessarily, as Price and many other of the best people of the Statllowed have been narrated, and the part of General Price fully told. Could Price have secured the fought with great valor. The year 1863 found Price again in the Trans-Mississippi. But he was alAmong those in the colony with him were Gen. Sterling Price, General McCausland of Virginia and Gen[24 more...]
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