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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Boonsborough (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
, was commissioned colonel with instructions to find his regiment in Missouri. Going with his company to Devall's Bluff he soon led the advance in a raid into Missouri and recruited his regiment in Lafayette county. In January, 1863, he was commanding a brigade including his own and three other Missouri regiments, and on the 13th of the following December he received the commission of brigadier-general. At the battle of Pea Ridge he especially distinguished himself, as also at Newtonia, Cane Hill and Prairie Grove. He commanded a division in the Cape Girardeau expedition, and in the attack on Helena was severely wounded. He was especially famous as raider, some of the most important expeditions being intrusted to him by General Price. On September 16, 1864, General Magruder, commanding the district of Arkansas, issued a congratulatory order in which he said: The major-general commanding this district announces with pride to the troops one of the most gallant exploits and success
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
tte McLaws and D. H. Hill, to watch McClellan's movements in the neighborhood of Westover. As soon as it was certain that the whole Federal army had been withdrawn to the defense of Washington City, these three divisions rejoined the army of Northern Virginia for the invasion of Maryland. Walker led his division to the support of Jackson at Harper's Ferry, and was directed to seize Loudoun Heights. This he did, and after the surrender of Harper's Ferry marched with the other divisions of Jackson's command to Sharpsburg. In the opening of the great battle of September 17, 1862, his division was first on the right, but was soon sent to the support of Jackson. On the way being asked for help by Gen. D. H. Hill, Walker sent him the Twenty-seventh North Carolina and the Third Arkansas, and hurried on with the rest of his force and, quickly forming on Hood's left, made sure Confederate victory in that part of the field. He was promoted to major-general November 8, 1862, and was now c
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
Biographical Visional army of the Confederate States, Accredited to Missouri. Major-General John S. Bommission of major-general in the army of the Confederate States. He fought with distinction in the other batte Guard; the son, a brigadier-general of the Confederate States army. The elder Clark was born in Madison coed his commission to enter the service of the Confederate States, April 17, 1861. With the commission of firsF. Jackson he tried to ally Missouri with the Confederate States. He was exceedingly active in organizing thle of the war; for a treaty of peace between the United States and Mexico had been signed a short time before. y unsatisfactory enterprise. He returned to the United States and died at St. Louis, Mo., on the 29th of Septeentucky. In 1867 General Shelby returned to the United States and to his farm in Missouri. He was to the laste major of cavalry in the regular army of the Confederate States, his commission being dated from March 16, 18
Richard Walsh (search for this): chapter 21
l displayed such staunch allegiance to the cause as to merit the extraordinary honor of the thanks of Congress. By a joint resolution, approved May 23, 1864, it was resolved, That the thanks of Congress are eminently due, and are hereby tendered, to Brig.-Gen. F. M. Cockrell, and the officers and soldiers composing the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth regiments of Missouri infantry, First, Second and Third regiments of Missouri cavalry, the batteries of Bledsoe, Landis, Guibor, Walsh, Dawson and Barret, and Woodson's detached company, all in the service of the Confederacy, east of the Mississippi river, for the prompt renewal of their pledges of fidelity to the cause of Southern independence for forty years, unless independence and peace, without curtailment of boundaries, shall be sooner secured. With these Missouri troops he moved with Polk's army to the support of Johnson against Sherman, reaching Kingston, Ga., May 17th, after which French's division was under fire
Ben McCulloch (search for this): chapter 21
The military events which followed have been narrated, and the part of General Price fully told. Could Price have secured the support and co-operation that he desired, he would probably have saved Missouri to the Confederacy, notwithstanding the strong Union sentiment that prevailed throughout the northern and eastern sections of the State. The battle of Elkhorn Tavern or Pea Ridge, in North Arkansas, was really won by Price and his Missourians, but Van Dorn, discouraged by the death of McCulloch and McIntosh and the consequent confusion in the wing commanded by them, and mistakenly thinking the enemy's force greatly superior to his own, gave up the victory in his grasp and retreated. General Van Dorn in his report says: During the whole of this engagement I was with the Missourians under Price, and I have never seen better fighters than these Missouri troops, or more gallant leaders than Price and his officers. From the first to the last shot they continually rushed on, and neve
ssouri regiments of his brigade, the Fourth and Sixth infantry and Third cavalry, lost 443 killed, wounded and missing. On the second day, and at Hatchie bridge, he commanded Hebert's division, took an important part in the fight and the protection of the retreat and was commended by General Price. When Grant crossed the Mississippi below Vicksburg, Green, commanding a brigade of Bowen's division, marched with part of his men to Port Gibson, took command of the forces already there, also of Tracy's brigade after it came up, selected the position occupied by the Confederate forces, and fought a gallant battle until overwhelmed by superior numbers. With his own proper command of about 800 men he withstood the attacks of several thousand Federals from a little after midnight until 10:30 a. m. During the siege of Vicksburg, which began on the 18th of May, he was indefatigable in the performance of duty. On June 25th he was wounded, and on the morning of the 27th when he was in the ditc
T. H. Holmes (search for this): chapter 21
bly. At this time occurred his duel with Brig.-Gen. L. M. Walker, which resulted in the death of the latter. Marmaduke was put in arrest, but was ordered to resume command during pending operations, and subsequently was formally released by General Holmes. On October 25, 1863, he attacked Pine Bluff with his division, but without success. At the opening of the Red river campaign, 1864, he held the line of the Ouachita, scouring the country in front to within 25 miles of Little Rock, and whencolonel and in September, 1861, was assigned to command of a brigade in Virginia, comprising the First Arkansas, Second Tennessee, and Twelfth North Carolina infantry. Not long afterward he was promoted to brigadiergen-eral. He served under General Holmes in the Aquia district and the department of North Carolina When Lee marched against Pope, he was placed in charge of a division and left with three other division commanders, R. H. Anderson, Lafayette McLaws and D. H. Hill, to watch McClellan
ance to the cause as to merit the extraordinary honor of the thanks of Congress. By a joint resolution, approved May 23, 1864, it was resolved, That the thanks of Congress are eminently due, and are hereby tendered, to Brig.-Gen. F. M. Cockrell, and the officers and soldiers composing the First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth regiments of Missouri infantry, First, Second and Third regiments of Missouri cavalry, the batteries of Bledsoe, Landis, Guibor, Walsh, Dawson and Barret, and Woodson's detached company, all in the service of the Confederacy, east of the Mississippi river, for the prompt renewal of their pledges of fidelity to the cause of Southern independence for forty years, unless independence and peace, without curtailment of boundaries, shall be sooner secured. With these Missouri troops he moved with Polk's army to the support of Johnson against Sherman, reaching Kingston, Ga., May 17th, after which French's division was under fire every day with one exception, u
Lew Wallace (search for this): chapter 21
engaged, Taylor again comments upon the admirable conduct of Walker's men in action. His division in the Red river campaign maintained its splendid record in the battles against Banks and Steele. In June, 1864, he was assigned to command the district of West Louisiana, succeeding Gen. Richard Taylor, and subsequently he was until March 31, 1865, in command of the district of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona, and at Houston on the 27th indignantly refused the terms of surrender offered by Gen. Lew Wallace at Point Isabel, declaring that he would not basely yield all that we have been fighting for during the last four years, namely, nationality and the rights of self government. His command at this time included Steele's Texas division of cavalry, Bee's Texas division of cavalry, Cooper's division of Indians, Bagby's division of Texas and Louisiana cavalry, and Slaughter's brigade. After the war General Walker served as consul-general at Bogota, and as special commissioner to invite the
Kirby Smith (search for this): chapter 21
next day commanded the division of Missouri infantry at the battle of Pleasant Hill, April 9th, losing 33 killed and 288 wounded. Upon the retreat of Banks, Gen. Kirby Smith detached Parson's command with other troops and marched against Steele in Arkansas. He encountered that general at Marks' Mill and again at Jenkins' Ferry, re inferior to himself in ability. At Helena, on July 4, 1863, Price's men were the only part of the army that carried the enemy's works. He co-operated with Kirby Smith in the campaign against Banks and Steele in 1864. General Price made his last desperate effort to recover Missouri in the latter part of 1864. His campaign wasithin a short distance of Kansas City, he was confronted by overwhelming numbers of the enemy and forced to retreat. At the close of the war he was included in Kirby Smith's surrender, but preferring exile to submission he left the country and found refuge in Mexico. There he engaged in a scheme of colonization under the imperial
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