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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
Chapter 23: On to Maryland Hays' and Starke's brigades return to Harper's Ferry battle of Sharpsburg the terrific struggle at the Dunker church valorous deeds of the Washington artillery Guard artillery Madison Tips. Long and lusty was the shrill bugle-call—To Maryland—in September, 1862. The pursuit of the eMaryland—in September, 1862. The pursuit of the enemy by Lee's army in September, 1862, had resulted in the Louisianians with Jackson crossing the Potomac into the State of Maryland, moving first to Frederick City and the Monocacy, where the bridge was burned; from the Monocacy, back again into Virginia by a forced march to Harper's Ferry, a march worthy of Stonewall's muscular State of Maryland, moving first to Frederick City and the Monocacy, where the bridge was burned; from the Monocacy, back again into Virginia by a forced march to Harper's Ferry, a march worthy of Stonewall's muscular foot cavalry. Under Jackson's forcible, suasive method, the Ferry capitulated with 11,000 prisoners and supplies. The Second Louisiana brigade, under General Starke, was there, formed in a line across a wooded ridge. There too, was Hays' brigade, in the division commanded by Gen. A. R. Lawton. On the morning of September 14th t<
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
bbling enthusiasm which so signally marked the members of every command that fought with Stonewall Jackson. I belong to Jackson's corps, as a military vaunt, is quite as fine as that republican boast, egosum civis Romanus, uttered nineteen hundred years ago by a Roman, whether on the banks of the near Rhine or of the distant Jordan. Of all the Louisiana batteries, the Louisiana Guard artillery alone was attached to Stonewall's corps. The battery followed him through the second day of Chancellorsville. After his death the Guard remained equally faithful to Ewell and Early. Fidelity was a proven trait of the Guard. In the battle of the 17th the battery was supported by Captain McClellan's sharpshooters. The boys could see the whites of the enemy's eyes. There was a bold charge; but it was a brave repulse. In the afternoon the company, by a proceeding not set down in the programme, captured a 10-pounder Parrott gun, afterward known as the D'Aquin's gun. Brave D'Aquin was fated n
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ack again into Virginia by a forced march to Harper's Ferry, a march worthy of Stonewall's muscular foot cavalry. Under Jackson's forcible, suasive method, the Ferry capitulated with 11,000 prisoners and supplies. The Second Louisiana brigade, und terrible storm of shell, canister and musketry. General Jones having been compelled to leave the field, the command of Jackson's division devolved on General Starke. With heroic spirit our lines advanced to the conflict, and maintained their posi7 missing, with no report from Coppens' battalion. Hays' brigade fought with equal valor in this historic struggle of Jackson's corps about the Dunker church. Moving to the support of the Georgia brigade, he advanced with his heroic 500 beyond tbbling enthusiasm which so signally marked the members of every command that fought with Stonewall Jackson. I belong to Jackson's corps, as a military vaunt, is quite as fine as that republican boast, egosum civis Romanus, uttered nineteen hundred
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
Chapter 23: On to Maryland Hays' and Starke's brigades return to Harper's Ferry battle of Sharpsburg the terrific struggle at the Dunker church valorous deeds of the Washington artillery Guard artillery Madison Tips. Long and lus City and the Monocacy, where the bridge was burned; from the Monocacy, back again into Virginia by a forced march to Harper's Ferry, a march worthy of Stonewall's muscular foot cavalry. Under Jackson's forcible, suasive method, the Ferry capitulatemanded by Gen. A. R. Lawton. On the morning of September 14th the white flag hoisted rendered fighting unnecessary. Harper's Ferry had surrendered. On September 17th the armies met face to face at Sharpsburg, where Jackson, having left A. P. Hill attending to certain details of the bloodless surrender of Harper's Ferry, had joined Lee on the 16th, bringing hope with the sight of his dingy cap with the dingier visor hiding his brow. The First brigade, under Gen. Harry T. Hays, who had joi
Jackson Crossing (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
Chapter 23: On to Maryland Hays' and Starke's brigades return to Harper's Ferry battle of Sharpsburg the terrific struggle at the Dunker church valorous deeds of the Washington artillery Guard artillery Madison Tips. Long and lusty was the shrill bugle-call—To Maryland—in September, 1862. The pursuit of the enemy by Lee's army in September, 1862, had resulted in the Louisianians with Jackson crossing the Potomac into the State of Maryland, moving first to Frederick City and the Monocacy, where the bridge was burned; from the Monocacy, back again into Virginia by a forced march to Harper's Ferry, a march worthy of Stonewall's muscular foot cavalry. Under Jackson's forcible, suasive method, the Ferry capitulated with 11,000 prisoners and supplies. The Second Louisiana brigade, under General Starke, was there, formed in a line across a wooded ridge. There too, was Hays' brigade, in the division commanded by Gen. A. R. Lawton. On the morning of September 14th the
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
own of infantry being broken by artillery fire at long range. The Louisiana Guard artillery, Captain D'Aquin, entered into the fight with the bubbling enthusiasm which so signally marked the members of every command that fought with Stonewall Jackson. I belong to Jackson's corps, as a military vaunt, is quite as fine as that republican boast, egosum civis Romanus, uttered nineteen hundred years ago by a Roman, whether on the banks of the near Rhine or of the distant Jordan. Of all the Louisiana batteries, the Louisiana Guard artillery alone was attached to Stonewall's corps. The battery followed him through the second day of Chancellorsville. After his death the Guard remained equally faithful to Ewell and Early. Fidelity was a proven trait of the Guard. In the battle of the 17th the battery was supported by Captain McClellan's sharpshooters. The boys could see the whites of the enemy's eyes. There was a bold charge; but it was a brave repulse. In the afternoon the company
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
ecessary. Harper's Ferry had surrendered. On September 17th the armies met face to face at Sharpsburg, where Jackson, having left A. P. Hill attending to certain details of the bloodless surrenderrow. The First brigade, under Gen. Harry T. Hays, who had joined it on the 15th, marched to Sharpsburg with Ewell's division, under Lawton; the Second brigade, under General Starke, with the Stonerliest participants in the battle were the Washington artillery, posted on a line just east of Sharpsburg, fronting the Antietam. During the afternoon of the 15th the Federal batteries appeared on thre the only ones of the battalion engaged. Down in front and to the right of the battalion at Sharpsburg was the bridge to be known as Burnside's, guarded by Toombs, and there Richardson, with two Naults; and two of the guns, with Garnett's brigade, drove the enemy from a ridge to the left of Sharpsburg. Captain Moody, Lieut. J. Sillers, Sergeants Conroy and Price, and Corporals Gaulin and Donoh
Inkerman (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
assaults; and two of the guns, with Garnett's brigade, drove the enemy from a ridge to the left of Sharpsburg. Captain Moody, Lieut. J. Sillers, Sergeants Conroy and Price, and Corporals Gaulin and Donoho were mentioned by Colonel Lee. Like Inkerman, in the Crimea, Sharpsburg on the Antietam was emphatically the battle of the privates. Like Inkerman, too, a fatality seemed to follow the field officers. The report of General Hays remarked, The terrible loss among the officers evinces with als Gaulin and Donoho were mentioned by Colonel Lee. Like Inkerman, in the Crimea, Sharpsburg on the Antietam was emphatically the battle of the privates. Like Inkerman, too, a fatality seemed to follow the field officers. The report of General Hays remarked, The terrible loss among the officers evinces with what fidelity they discharged their duties; Colonel Pendleton said, It is a noteworthy fact that not a single field officer in the brigade who was on duty that day escaped untouched.
C. W. Squires (search for this): chapter 23
egan, lasting for forty minutes, when General Longstreet sent word to save the ammunition. Captain Squires' rifles were the only ones of the battalion engaged. Down in front and to the right of the movement of the enemy. On the morning of the 17th the Federal infantry appeared in front of Squires, posted at the east side of the village, and waiting till they came in effective range, disregaoncentrated fire. Now the Federals sent up a regiment against the obnoxious batteries. Twice Squires drove them back. A third time, reinforced, the Federals advanced and were repulsed, and the fourth charge only resulted in heavier loss, for they came within range of Squires' canister. Lieutenant Owen, wounded, and Galbraith and Brown were worthy leaders of brave men in this defense of the st discharge, was killed by a minie ball. In the afternoon, Moody, with four guns, fought with Squires before the village, repulsing many assaults; and two of the guns, with Garnett's brigade, drove
ry Madison Tips. Long and lusty was the shrill bugle-call—To Maryland—in September, 1862. The pursuit of the enemy by Lee's army in September, 1862, had resulted in the Louisianians with Jackson crossing the Potomac into the State of Maryland, here Jackson, having left A. P. Hill attending to certain details of the bloodless surrender of Harper's Ferry, had joined Lee on the 16th, bringing hope with the sight of his dingy cap with the dingier visor hiding his brow. The First brigade, uieut. J. B. Gorey. The Tips doggedly retained their position until the infantry on their right and left melted away, when Lee ordered them to the rear. Lieutenant Gorey, while sighting a piece for the last discharge, was killed by a minie ball. Iburg. Captain Moody, Lieut. J. Sillers, Sergeants Conroy and Price, and Corporals Gaulin and Donoho were mentioned by Colonel Lee. Like Inkerman, in the Crimea, Sharpsburg on the Antietam was emphatically the battle of the privates. Like Inkerm
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