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in the flank movement which compelled the surrender of General Prentiss, and they closed a brilliant day's work with a charge upon the Federal camp, in the face of artillery and musketry. Here Capt. Ashbel Smith, who had distinguished himself, was wounded severely. Gen. John K. Jackson, brigade commander, reported that when Prentiss put up the white flag, an officer of the Texas regiment was sent to receive the surrender, which he did, along with several of the swords of officers. On the second day Lieut.-Col. W. P. Rogers was in charge of the regiment and Colonel Moore commanded a provisional brigade, including Wheeler's regiment. The Texas Rangers, under Colonel Wharton, fought in this battle, dismounted and mounted, supported a battery on the first day, and served in the rear guard on the retreat. Colonel Wharton was wounded, but remained on duty until Tuesday morning when he turned over the command to Maj. Thomas Harrison, who made a brilliant fight in a reconnoissance that
ronghold. He sleeps, and Glory is his sentinel. The Texans of Moore's brigade and Phifer's, in Maury's division, were among the first to engage the enemy on the 3d, and the two brigades, pursuing the Federals to the edge of the town, fought heavily throughout the day. On the next morning, the Confederate artillery being withdr Third Arkansas were moved by the right to the position occupied by the Fourth and Fifth, and formed on their left, where the brigade remained during the day of the 3d, keeping up a continuous skirmishing with the enemy's sharpshooters, in which we had a number of our men severely wounded. I sent my assistant adjutant-general, Can the discharge of that duty, was either killed or fell into the hands of the enemy, as he has not been seen nor heard of since. About dark on the evening of the 3d, the brigade, with the division, fell back to the hill and formed in line, where it remained during the 4th. Lieut. J. R. Loughridge, commanding Company 1, Fourth T
ilson's landing, on Red river, where the enemy's transports were constantly passing. Before West's battery could be brought up, Chisum's regiment, under Captain Wilson, and Lieutenant Smith's Arizona scouts chased and captured one transport. Although driven thence to Marksville, General Major's Texans continued to interfere with the transports. On May 3d, West's battery, under Lieutenant Yoist, and Hardeman's brigade captured the City Belle, with part of an Ohio regiment on board. On the 5th, attacked by two gunboats, the Texans, under Baylor, Madison, Major Saufley and Lieutenant-Colonel Mullen, burned one gunboat and captured the other and a transport. Among the wounded on May 3d, was Capt. J. W. Thompson, of Lane's regiment. On the 13th and 15th the Texas cavalry were engaged with the advance of the Federal army, near Mansura. Here Captain McKee, of Madison's regiment, was mortally wounded. On the 18th was fought the battle of Yellow Bayou, where the Texans suffered heavy
report of Maj.-Gen. Richard Taylor describe the part taken by Texans in the victories at Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, April 8 and 9, 1864: In the morning of the 8th, I moved down to the position selected for the troops. Walker's division occupied the right of the road, facing Pleasant Hill; Buchel's and Terrell's regiments of and his own—on April 7th, when Lieuts. W. T. Brown and F. B. Chilton, of his regiment, were wounded, the former mortally. In the first action of the brigade on the 8th, when they fought dismounted, they captured a battery, but lost heavily, Lieut. G. E. Rottenstein falling gallantly at the head of his company. Here Colonel Lane wupon the field, dead or wounded; but they had delivered a staggering blow, and broken the force of the Federal advance. and reached Spottsylvania Court House on the 8th. On the 10th they aided in repulsing the last and most desperate assault by the enemy upon Field's position. During the remainder of the fighting here and at Cold
through the pines with apparently irresistible force, when Gregg's 800 Texans, regardless of numbers, flanks or supports, dashed directly upon them. There was a terrific crash, mingled with wild yells, which settled down into a steady roar of musketry. In less than ten minutes one-half of that devoted 800 were lying upon the field, dead or wounded; but they had delivered a staggering blow, and broken the force of the Federal advance. and reached Spottsylvania Court House on the 8th. On the 10th they aided in repulsing the last and most desperate assault by the enemy upon Field's position. During the remainder of the fighting here and at Cold Harbor, they manifested their old-time courage and tenacity. They were on the line at Kershaw's salient, where fourteen Federal assaults were repulsed with great slaughter. After serving on the Petersburg lines in the early summer the brigade was transferred to the north side of the James before Richmond. In September, about the time of the
ad reached Mansfield from Texas on the evening of the 9th and morning of the 10th with Terrell's regiment, which had been returned to Mansfield from Pleasant Hill to forage, all being cavalry, were pushed down to Green on the 10th and early on the 11th. Nettles', J. A. A. West's, McMahan's, and Moseley's batteries were also sent down, and General Green was informed of the position and movements of the fleet. The importance of reaching Blair's landing in advance of the fleet was impressed upon him. Green with his usual energy marched from Pleasant Hill for Blair's landing at 6 p. m. of the 11th. The same difficulty which met Bagby in the passage of the Bayou Pierre, namely, the want of a pontoon—which reference to my correspondence with the department headquarters will show I had long before asked for—seriously delayed Green's movement. He, however, reached the river at and below Blair's landing on the 12th, with Wood's, Gould's and Parsons' commands, and engaged the fleet. The los
ortance of reaching Blair's landing in advance of the fleet was impressed upon him. Green with his usual energy marched from Pleasant Hill for Blair's landing at 6 p. m. of the 11th. The same difficulty which met Bagby in the passage of the Bayou Pierre, namely, the want of a pontoon—which reference to my correspondence with the department headquarters will show I had long before asked for—seriously delayed Green's movement. He, however, reached the river at and below Blair's landing on the 12th, with Wood's, Gould's and Parsons' commands, and engaged the fleet. The loss inflicted upon the crowded transports of the enemy was terrible. Several times the transports raised the white flag, but the gunboats, protected by their plating, kept up the heavy fire and compelled our troops to renew the punishment on the transports. Many times our sharpshooters forced the gunboats to close their portholes, and it is believed the result would have been the capture of the whole fleet but for the
riven thence to Marksville, General Major's Texans continued to interfere with the transports. On May 3d, West's battery, under Lieutenant Yoist, and Hardeman's brigade captured the City Belle, with part of an Ohio regiment on board. On the 5th, attacked by two gunboats, the Texans, under Baylor, Madison, Major Saufley and Lieutenant-Colonel Mullen, burned one gunboat and captured the other and a transport. Among the wounded on May 3d, was Capt. J. W. Thompson, of Lane's regiment. On the 13th and 15th the Texas cavalry were engaged with the advance of the Federal army, near Mansura. Here Captain McKee, of Madison's regiment, was mortally wounded. On the 18th was fought the battle of Yellow Bayou, where the Texans suffered heavy loss in attacking the Federal rear guard. Jenkins' Ferry and Poison Spring. Brig.-Gen. Thomas N. Waul, reporting the action of his brigade at Jenkins' Ferry, said that his men marched through rain and mud, to the sound of battle, and went into the f
eight attempts had failed. Whitfield had 460 men in action and reported that he lost 106 in killed and wounded in this charge, most of whom fell at or near the battery. The brave Lieut. W. F. F. Wynn was among those killed at the guns. The loss of the Third is given at 22 killed and 74 wounded out of 388. The Second infantry, then known as Second Texas sharpshooters, was with General Maury resisting another Federal column, and, under Col. W. P. Rogers, repulsed the enemy's advance on the 16th, and was conspicuous in a successful ambuscade on the 19th, which saved the rear of Price's army from attack. In his report of the battle of Corinth, October 3d and 4th, two days of carnage where many brave men died and many were distinguished for valor, General Van Dorn named one man for conspicuous heroism. I cannot refrain, he said, from mentioning here the conspicuous gallantry of a noble Texan, whose deeds at Corinth are the constant theme of both friends and foes. As long as courag
that the brigade took position on the Confederate left, near Mumma church, on the evening of September 15th, and being under artillery fire at that time, the Fourth lost Lieut. N. J. Mills, severely wounded, and one private. On the evening of the 16th they were moved to the left and front of the church and formed, with a cornfield in their front. During that evening Captain Turner, with the Fifth, and Capt. W. H. Martin, with a detachment of the Fourth, were engaged in skirmishing. On the 17th the brigade advanced toward the cornfield and engaged in a desperate fight. Hood reported that this was the most terrible clash of arms, by far, that had occurred during the war. The two little giant brigades (Hood's and Law's) wrestled with the mighty force of the enemy, losing hundreds of their gallant officers and men, but driving the enemy from his position and forcing him to abandon his guns on our left. Said Wofford: This brigade went into action numbering 854, and lost in killed, wo
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