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ign of raising the siege of Vicksburg. After the fall of Vicksburg and the evacuation of Jackson, when forces were being concentrated in Georgia to enable Bragg to defeat Rosecrans, Gregg's brigade was one of those sent for that purpose. On the second day at Chickamauga the heavy pressure on Thomas caused Rosecrans to support him by sending troops which left a gap in the Federal line. Into this Longstreet immediately pushed the brigades of McNair, Gregg, Kershaw, Law, Humphrey, Benning and RoTexas regiment going into Granbury's brigade; and when Longstreet returned to Virginia in the spring of 1864, Gregg went with him in command of Hood's old brigade, embracing the First, Fourth and Fifth Texas and Third Arkansas regiments. On the second day of the battle of the Wilderness, when Longstreet's corps checked the victorious onset of the Federals, General Gregg and his Texans won immortal fame. He took an active part in the great struggle thus inaugurated, from the Rapidan to the Jam
hat, on November 8, 1863, Gen. E. Kirby Smith, commander of the Trans-Mississippi department, wrote to the war department at Richmond, asking the promotion of Col. Horace Randal to the rank of brigadier-general. At the battle of Mansfield, April 8, 1864, Randal fought under the eye of Gen. Richard Taylor, who said of him: In vigor, energy and daring, Randal surpassed my expectations, high as they were of him and his fine brigade. This high opinion was strengthened by Randal's conduct on the 9th, at Pleasant Hill The commission of brigadier-general conferred upon him, dated April 8, 1864, was an honor that had been well earned. He did not, however, receive the news of his promotion, for he fell, mortally wounded, in the battle of Jenkins' Ferry, April 30, 1864, at the crossing of the Sabine, in Arkansas. In him Texas and the South lost a gallant defender. Brigadier-General Felix H. Robertson Brigadier-General Felix H. Robertson, accredited to Texas, on the 9th of March, 1861
country by the expedition under Banks, and was promoted to major-general early in 1864. Called again to Louisiana, when Texas was threatened by the Red river expedition, he commanded the cavalry corps at the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill with great distinction, and, pursuing the enemy, lost his life at Blair's landing, April 12, 1863. Major-General Banks, commanding the Federal army, in his report to General Sherman, said: General Green was killed by the fire of the gunboats on the 12th; he was the ablest officer in their service. Brigadier-General Elkanah Greer Brigadier-General Elkanah Greer entered the Confederate army in the Third Texas cavalry, of which he was commissioned colonel on the 1st of July, 1861. His first battle was that of Wilson's Creek, Missouri, August 10, 1861. Here Colonel Greer proved well his fitness for command. In October, Governor Jackson sent him as the bearer of a note to President Davis at Richmond, writing in the way of introduction, T
ippi, while under the command of General Beauregard, a little affair in which Colonel Lane was engaged was made the subject of a special order. This happened just before the evacuation of Corinth, and the following is the notice it received from General Beauregard: The general commanding takes great pleasure in calling the attention of the army to the brave, skillful and gallant conduct of Lieutenant-Colonel Lane, of the Third regiment Texas dismounted cavalry, who, with 246 men, on the 29th ultimo, charged a largely superior force of enemy; drove him from his position, and forced him to leave a large number of his dead and wounded upon the field. The conduct of this brave regiment is worthy of all honor and imitation. In the reports of operations in Louisiana in 1863, Colonel Lane's name appears frequently. On the 13th of July the Confederates, under Gen. Thomas Green, gained a brilliant victory on the Bayou Lafourche. Colonel Lane commanded a brigade in this affair, and General
onson Granbury Brigadier-General Hiram Bronson Granbury was one of the most gallant of the valiant officers of the soldier State of Texas. Entering the Confederate army as captain of a company in Gregg's regiment, Seventh Texas, he went with his command to Kentucky, and at the organization, in November, 1861, was elected major. He was on duty in Kentucky until early in 862, when the brigade to which he was attached was ordered to Fort Donelson. In the battle at that important post, in February, his regiment was in the gallant charge which successfully opened the way for the retreat of the Confederate army. That the opportunity was not improved was not the fault of the gallant men who gained the fight. Col. John M. Simonton, who on this occasion led the brigade, said of Major Granbury, that he had now the confidence of his command and was entitled to the highest commendation of his countrymen. Col. John Gregg, of his regiment, also speaks well of the efficient assistance of Gra
Colonel McIntosh at once set out to break up their camp. He came upon the forces of the hostile chief at Chustenahlah, December 26, 1861, and, after a fierce battle, completely defeated, them. In his report he said: The South Kansas-Texas regiment, led by their gallant officers, Lieutenant-Colonel Lane and Major Chilton, breasted itself for the highest point of the hill, and rushed over its rugged side with the insatiable force of a tornado and swept everything before it. In the following March this regiment was again engaged in the fierce battle of Pea Ridge, in northern Arkansas. Colonel Greer, again commanding the brigade, in his official report complimented Lieutenant-Colonel Lane upon his gallant conduct and bearing throughout the whole engagement. On the east side of the Mississippi, while under the command of General Beauregard, a little affair in which Colonel Lane was engaged was made the subject of a special order. This happened just before the evacuation of Corinth, a
n Arizona and New Mexico, and largely composed of soldiers from his former commands. In the battles of Valverde, Glorieta, Los Cruces, and others, he shared the trials and sufferings of his command with heroic fortitude, and on the retreat his command won the admiration of their victorious enemies. In the defeat of the Federal land and naval forces at Galveston, January 1, 1863, he distinguished himself in command of the line troops, the ships and artillery being under Maj. Leon Smith. In April following he was in Louisiana with Gen. Richard Taylor, gained renewed commendation for his conduct at Camp Bisland, and was put in command of Sibley's brigade. On May 20, 1863, he was promoted to brigadier-general. In command of his brigade he operated brilliantly against the Federals in Louisiana, on the Lafourche in July, 1863, on the Fordoche in September, and in the Teche country in October, winning a brilliant victory at Bayou Bourbeau November 3d. General Taylor in his report gave G
brilliant and successful charge which decided the fortunes of the day. He was, in the latter part of 1862, promoted to colonel, and in a short time was commanding the brigade of General Green, who had command of division. The Texas cavalry commands did splendid service in the defense of their own State and of Louisiana. At the opening of the Red river campaign of 1864, Colonel Hardeman led his regiment in Bagby's brigade of the cavalry division of General Major, which reached Mansfield, April 6th, and in this capacity had a conspicuous part in the battle of April 8th, as well as at Pleasant Hill, April 9th. In the subsequent pursuit of Banks, the exploits of the cavalry were brilliant and successful. On October 28, 1864, Gen. Kirby Smith earnestly recommended Colonel Hardeman for promotion to the rank of brigadier-general, mentioning him, with Debray and Lane, as the best brigade commanders in the Trans-Mississippi department. In a letter written December 23d, Adjutant-General C
e was, in the latter part of 1862, promoted to colonel, and in a short time was commanding the brigade of General Green, who had command of division. The Texas cavalry commands did splendid service in the defense of their own State and of Louisiana. At the opening of the Red river campaign of 1864, Colonel Hardeman led his regiment in Bagby's brigade of the cavalry division of General Major, which reached Mansfield, April 6th, and in this capacity had a conspicuous part in the battle of April 8th, as well as at Pleasant Hill, April 9th. In the subsequent pursuit of Banks, the exploits of the cavalry were brilliant and successful. On October 28, 1864, Gen. Kirby Smith earnestly recommended Colonel Hardeman for promotion to the rank of brigadier-general, mentioning him, with Debray and Lane, as the best brigade commanders in the Trans-Mississippi department. In a letter written December 23d, Adjutant-General Cooper stated to General Smith that President Davis had nominated W. P. H
ted to colonel, and in a short time was commanding the brigade of General Green, who had command of division. The Texas cavalry commands did splendid service in the defense of their own State and of Louisiana. At the opening of the Red river campaign of 1864, Colonel Hardeman led his regiment in Bagby's brigade of the cavalry division of General Major, which reached Mansfield, April 6th, and in this capacity had a conspicuous part in the battle of April 8th, as well as at Pleasant Hill, April 9th. In the subsequent pursuit of Banks, the exploits of the cavalry were brilliant and successful. On October 28, 1864, Gen. Kirby Smith earnestly recommended Colonel Hardeman for promotion to the rank of brigadier-general, mentioning him, with Debray and Lane, as the best brigade commanders in the Trans-Mississippi department. In a letter written December 23d, Adjutant-General Cooper stated to General Smith that President Davis had nominated W. P. Hardeman, J. E. Harrison and W. P. Lane a
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