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home in Austin, where he died on January 9, 1895. Brigadier-General Matthew Duncan Ector Brigadier-General Matthew Duncan Ector is one of the famous names of the army of Tennessee. In 1862 he was colonel of the Fourteenth Texas cavalry; in August of the same year he was made a brigadier-general. He had served in the cavalry in North Mississippi, but during the Kentucky campaign led his regiment, the Fourteenth Texas, dismounted. He was present at the battle at Richmond, Ky., and Col. Tod of twenty years, from 1841 to 86,despite his absence in the field, he was retained in the office of clerk of the Supreme court of Texas, an evidence of the popular appreciation of his abilities. He entered the Confederate army in 1861, and in August was appointed colonel of the Fifth Texas mounted rifles, raised in Arizona and New Mexico, and largely composed of soldiers from his former commands. In the battles of Valverde, Glorieta, Los Cruces, and others, he shared the trials and sufferin
August 28th (search for this): chapter 19
he defense of Mobile in the last days of the war. After peace had been restored he returned to his home in Texas. Brigadier-General Richard M. Gano Brigadier-General Richard M. Gano entered the Confederate army in 1861, commanding a squadron consisting of two companies of Texas cavalry. His force formed a part of John H. Morgan's command. When Kirby Smith entered Kentucky, in August, 1862, he ordered Colonel Morgan to report to him at Lexington, in the blue grass region. On the 28th of August, Morgan entered Kentucky with his force consisting of the Second Kentucky cavalry, 700 strong, and Gano's squadron, 150 strong. When he reached Lexington, September 4th, he found Kirby Smith already there. Taking Gano with him, and the recruits, of whom he had collected a good number, he started to go to the assistance of Marshall, in eastern Kentucky, who was expected to intercept the Federal General Morgan, retreating from Cumberland Gap, and detain him until Stevenson could overtake
852-53, and on frontier duty at Fort Chadbourne, Texas, 1853. He resigned in September of that year, and began the study of law. Being admitted to the bar, he practeracy. During a part of 186he was aide-de-camp to the governor of Texas. In September of that year he entered the regular Confederate service as major of the Secon, on the Rio Grande. He fought with distinction in the battle of Monterey in September, and his daring aggressiveness in this battle won for him commendation as a sthe Federals in Louisiana, on the Lafourche in July, 1863, on the Fordoche in September, and in the Teche country in October, winning a brilliant victory at Bayou Bo was, however, ready for the fray when General Longstreet went to Georgia, in September, and took part in the battle of Chickamauga. Later in the month General Robemilitary school attached, he remained there and studied military tactics. In September he returned to Texas and raised a company for the Confederate army. He was c
September 4th (search for this): chapter 19
Richard M. Gano entered the Confederate army in 1861, commanding a squadron consisting of two companies of Texas cavalry. His force formed a part of John H. Morgan's command. When Kirby Smith entered Kentucky, in August, 1862, he ordered Colonel Morgan to report to him at Lexington, in the blue grass region. On the 28th of August, Morgan entered Kentucky with his force consisting of the Second Kentucky cavalry, 700 strong, and Gano's squadron, 150 strong. When he reached Lexington, September 4th, he found Kirby Smith already there. Taking Gano with him, and the recruits, of whom he had collected a good number, he started to go to the assistance of Marshall, in eastern Kentucky, who was expected to intercept the Federal General Morgan, retreating from Cumberland Gap, and detain him until Stevenson could overtake and attack him in the rear. Though this scheme did not work, Morgan's command performed many brilliant exploits. He had gone into Kentucky with about 900 effective tro
September 12th (search for this): chapter 19
4, when he was detailed to Kansas, Dakota and Nebraska, where he was engaged in various expeditions against the Indians. He resigned his commission in the United States army in May, 1861, to join the Confederate army, and was appointed colonel of the Seventh Texas cavalry. During the expedition to New Mexico, early in 1862, under Gen. H. H. Sibley, he was in command in the Mesilla region, sent on expedition to Tucson, and held his post to the last. He was promoted to brigadier-general September 12th, and in January, 1863, he was assigned to command of the Indian Territory, where his energy in organization and administration won this commendation from the President: His service was efficient and of inestimable value. In March, 1864, he was assigned to command of the defenses at Galveston, but soon afterward took part in the Red river campaign, and, after the death of Gen. Thomas Green, commanded a division of cavalry. In reporting the operations following the battle of Pleasant Hil
September 19th (search for this): chapter 19
command of Brig.-Gen. Albert Pike. Col. Henry Little, who commanded the First brigade of Missouri volunteers, in his report thanks Major Whitfield, with several others, for the manner in which, with his command, he supported his (Little's) movements in the field. When General Price was about to cross the Mississippi in 1862, Colonel Whitfield was ordered to proceed to Memphis with his command and report to that officer. General Price, in his report of the battle of Iuka, Miss., fought September 19th, said that Whitfield's legion won, under its gallant leader, a reputation for dashing boldness and steady courage which placed them side by side with the bravest and the best, and noted with regret that Colonel Whitfield was painfully wounded. At the close of the year Colonel Whitfield, having recovered, was at Yazoo City with his cavalry command. He participated in the successful cavalry battle of Van Dorn near Spring Hill, on March 5, 1863, and received the thanks of General Van Dorn
ey's brigade. On May 20, 1863, he was promoted to brigadier-general. In command of his brigade he operated brilliantly against the Federals in Louisiana, on the Lafourche in July, 1863, on the Fordoche in September, and in the Teche country in October, winning a brilliant victory at Bayou Bourbeau November 3d. General Taylor in his report gave General Green high praise, declaring that he seized, in a masterly manner, the exact moment when a heavy blow could be given. Taylor had already freqthe Confederate army in the Third Texas cavalry, of which he was commissioned colonel on the 1st of July, 1861. His first battle was that of Wilson's Creek, Missouri, August 10, 1861. Here Colonel Greer proved well his fitness for command. In October, Governor Jackson sent him as the bearer of a note to President Davis at Richmond, writing in the way of introduction, The bearer of this note, Colonel Greer, of Texas, is probably better known to you than myself, but I know him well and can say
October 1st (search for this): chapter 19
navailing and save useless carnage and bloodshed. With three negro boatmen, he crossed the bay in the face of a terrific cross-fire of ball and shell, and, entering the fort through an embrasure, insisted on surrender by Major Anderson, as further resistance was useless. This act of heroism and humanity won for him great distinction. After the battle of Fort Sumter he proceeded to Richmond, where he was commissioned colonel of the Second regiment of Texas infantry, August 28, 1861. On October 1st of the same year he was made brigadier-general. He rendered valuable service in the army of Northern Virginia, in command of the brigade including the First, Fourth and Fifth Texas, later famous under the leadership of Hood, until February 20, 1862, when he resigned to take a seat in the Confederate Senate, to which body he had been elected from Texas. But he continued to serve in the field as staff officer whenever opportunity offered, notably in the battles around Richmond. He remai
es to terms. He was an active participant in all the stirring events that occurred from the independence of Texas until the annexation to the United States. In 1848 he was elected to the lower house of the State legislature, and in 1850 to the State senate. He was a member of the State convention that passed the ordinance of secession, and was one of the first to raise a company for the war, entering the Confederate service, as a captain, in the Fifth Texas infantry, Hood's brigade. In November of the same year he became lieutenantcol-onel, and on June 1, 1862, he was commissioned colonel of the regiment. He led it through the Seven Days battles around Richmond, and, though wounded at Second Manassas, was at Boonsboro gap, after which his physical exhaustion was so great that he had to be carried from the field, and was unable to take part in the battle of Sharpsburg. But he had so well proved his ability to command troops in action that, on November 1, 1862, he was commissioned
November 3rd (search for this): chapter 19
illery being under Maj. Leon Smith. In April following he was in Louisiana with Gen. Richard Taylor, gained renewed commendation for his conduct at Camp Bisland, and was put in command of Sibley's brigade. On May 20, 1863, he was promoted to brigadier-general. In command of his brigade he operated brilliantly against the Federals in Louisiana, on the Lafourche in July, 1863, on the Fordoche in September, and in the Teche country in October, winning a brilliant victory at Bayou Bourbeau November 3d. General Taylor in his report gave General Green high praise, declaring that he seized, in a masterly manner, the exact moment when a heavy blow could be given. Taylor had already frequently commended the gallant Texan, and protested that he was left unable to say any more except that he exceeded expectations, which had been thought impossible. This officer, continued Taylor, has within the past few months commanded In three successful engagements, on the Lafourche, on the Fordoche, an
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