hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Galveston (Texas, United States) 127 1 Browse Search
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) 104 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 102 0 Browse Search
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) 99 1 Browse Search
John S. Ford 94 8 Browse Search
Sam Houston 81 5 Browse Search
Thomas Green 74 8 Browse Search
John Gregg 71 5 Browse Search
John G. Walker 71 3 Browse Search
San Antonio (Texas, United States) 69 3 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

Found 1,621 total hits in 485 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
November 28th (search for this): chapter 19
erved during the Atlanta campaign. Then, being promoted to brigadier-general, he commanded a brigade of cavalry, and General Wheeler, in reporting the Tennessee campaign under Hood, mentions Robertson among the officers to whom he gives special thanks for bravery and fidelity. As Sherman marched through Georgia, General Robertson was one of the ablest lieutenants of Wheeler in harassing the Federals and frequently defeating their raiding parties. He was reported as wounded in a fight, November 28th. In General Wheeler's last report, March, 1865, he mentioned General Robertson as one of his generals still disabled from wounds. After the close of the war General Robertson made his home at Austin, Tex. Brigadier-General Jerome B. Robertson Brigadier-General Jerome B. Robertson was born in Woodford county, Ky. At the age of twelve, being left an orphan without means, he was bound out for the period of his minority; but by industry and economy he purchased his liberty at eightee
November 30th (search for this): chapter 19
s born in Tennessee in 183. He entered the United States military academy in 1849, was graduated in 1854 as brevet second lieutenant of infantry, and in the following year was promoted to second lieutenant, First dragoons. His service in the United States army was mainly on frontier duty, in the course of which he engaged in combats with the Indians; against the Apaches, near Fort Bliss, in 1855, and near the Almagre mountains, New Mexico, in April, 1856, and again near the Gila river, November 30th of the same year. He resigned February 27, 1861, and in the war between the North and South bore a conspicuous part as leader of Texas troops. In 1862 he had command of a brigade of Texas cavalry, McCulloch's division, and was on duty in the district of Arkansas. He proved himself a very efficient officer and, like many others, was in command of a brigade long before he received a commission as brigadier-general. At the battle of Milliken's Bend, during the siege of Vicksburg, Randal
e Vicksburg campaign, the Seventh Texas, the First, Third, Tenth, Thirtieth, Forty-first and Fiftieth regiments of Tennessee infantry, and Bledsoe's light battery of artillery. When Sherman, with 33,000 men, began his movement upon Vicksburg in December, the brigades of Barton, Gregg and Vaughn were promptly transferred from Grenada to Vicksburg. In the battle which occurred at Chickasaw bayou, December 27, 1862, resulting in the repulse of Sherman with a loss of 1,776 in killed, wounded and md subsequent operations, until disabled by a wound. He was soon in the saddle again, and, in October, 1864, was recommended by Gen. E. Kirby Smith for promotion to the rank of brigadier-general. His nomination was sent in by President Davis in December, and his commission was dated March 17, 1865. The war soon after came to an end, and the gallant men who had so bravely upheld the cause of the South returned to their homes, to help rebuild the shattered fortunes of their beloved States. Gene
December 5th (search for this): chapter 19
body. Brigadier-General Xavier Blanchard Debray Brigadier-General Xavier Blanchard Debray rendered his military services, which were of great value and prominence, altogether in the Trans-Mississippi department, which was a large part of the time almost isolated from the rest of the Confederacy. During a part of 186he was aide-de-camp to the governor of Texas. In September of that year he entered the regular Confederate service as major of the Second regiment of Texas infantry. December 5th of the same year he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of a battalion of cavalry. With this command he was very active in scouting, reporting movements of the enemy, attacking their forces whenever it was advisable, and useful in every way to the commanding general. In the attack upon the Federals at Galveston on January 1, 1863, he was notably active, so that General Magruder in his official report gives special commendation to him in connection with other officers for efficiency and
December 23rd (search for this): chapter 19
ch reached Mansfield, April 6th, and in this capacity had a conspicuous part in the battle of April 8th, as well as at Pleasant Hill, April 9th. In the subsequent pursuit of Banks, the exploits of the cavalry were brilliant and successful. On October 28, 1864, Gen. Kirby Smith earnestly recommended Colonel Hardeman for promotion to the rank of brigadier-general, mentioning him, with Debray and Lane, as the best brigade commanders in the Trans-Mississippi department. In a letter written December 23d, Adjutant-General Cooper stated to General Smith that President Davis had nominated W. P. Hardeman, J. E. Harrison and W. P. Lane as brigadiergen-erals. After the close of the war General Hardeman returned to peaceful pursuits, making his home at Austin, Texas. Brigadier-General James E. Harrison Many persons who are familiar with the great, decisive campaigns of the civil war, have but a faint conception of the deeds of the many heroic spirits who endured privations, went on long
November 11th, 1811 AD (search for this): chapter 19
was sent in by President Davis in December, and his commission was dated March 17, 1865. The war soon after came to an end, and the gallant men who had so bravely upheld the cause of the South returned to their homes, to help rebuild the shattered fortunes of their beloved States. General Lane still lives (1898) in Texas, where he enjoys the esteem of his neighbors and friends. Brigadier-General Ben McCulloch Brigadier-General Ben McCulloch was born in Rutherford county, Tenn., November 11, 1811, of a well-known family in Tennessee, with whom were connected the Fosters, Lytles and Nicholses, descendants of the Scotch-Irish borderers, who wrested Tennessee and Kentucky from the red men. His father was Alexander McCulloch, who won distinction as an aide-de-camp of Gen. James Coffee, under General Jackson, in the Creek and British wars of 1812 and 1815. Ben McCulloch spent his early life in Dyer county, Tenn. He seemed to have a natural love and talent for woodcraft, and became
neighbors and friends. Brigadier-General Ben McCulloch Brigadier-General Ben McCulloch was born in Rutherford county, Tenn., November 11, 1811, of a well-known family in Tennessee, with whom were connected the Fosters, Lytles and Nicholses, descendants of the Scotch-Irish borderers, who wrested Tennessee and Kentucky from the red men. His father was Alexander McCulloch, who won distinction as an aide-de-camp of Gen. James Coffee, under General Jackson, in the Creek and British wars of 1812 and 1815. Ben McCulloch spent his early life in Dyer county, Tenn. He seemed to have a natural love and talent for woodcraft, and became an expert hunter, raftsman and flatboatman, an experience which was useful in his later military career. In 1835, when about to join a party of trappers and hunters to the Rocky mountains, he heard of Gen. David Crockett's expedition to aid the struggle for the independence of Texas, and immediately started for Nacogdoches, the place of rendezvous. He arr
June 8th, 1814 AD (search for this): chapter 19
. During the ill-fated Tennessee campaign of General Hood, in the fearful charge at Franklin, fell Gen. Pat. Cleburne, commander of one of the most renowned divisions of the Confederate army, and General Granbury, the leader of one of its most celebrated brigades. Their loss could never be compensated, and to this day the survivors of the army of Tennessee mention their names with reverence. Major-General Thomas Green Major-General Thomas Green was born in Amelia county, Virginia, June 8, 1814. His father was Nathan Green, one of the most eminent jurors of Tennessee, a Supreme court judge, and president of Lebanon law college, that illustrious institution where so many of America's most prominent men received their legal education. In the fall of 1835, at the age of twenty-one, Thomas Green left his home in Tennessee and entered the ranks of the revolutionary army in Texas. He fought his first battle at San Jacinto, April 21, 1836, and from then until the disbandment of the
s and friends. Brigadier-General Ben McCulloch Brigadier-General Ben McCulloch was born in Rutherford county, Tenn., November 11, 1811, of a well-known family in Tennessee, with whom were connected the Fosters, Lytles and Nicholses, descendants of the Scotch-Irish borderers, who wrested Tennessee and Kentucky from the red men. His father was Alexander McCulloch, who won distinction as an aide-de-camp of Gen. James Coffee, under General Jackson, in the Creek and British wars of 1812 and 1815. Ben McCulloch spent his early life in Dyer county, Tenn. He seemed to have a natural love and talent for woodcraft, and became an expert hunter, raftsman and flatboatman, an experience which was useful in his later military career. In 1835, when about to join a party of trappers and hunters to the Rocky mountains, he heard of Gen. David Crockett's expedition to aid the struggle for the independence of Texas, and immediately started for Nacogdoches, the place of rendezvous. He arrived too
January, 1815 AD (search for this): chapter 19
he confusion on the right from becoming disastrous. On May 13, 1864, Gen. E. Kirby Smith assigned Col. Richard Waterhouse to duty with the rank of brigadiergen-eral, to date from April 30, 1864, subject to the approval of the President. The faithful military service of General Waterhouse ceased only with the downfall of the Confederacy. Since then he has been a citizen of Texas. Brigadier-General Thomas N. Waul Brigadier-General Thomas N. Waul was born in Sumter district, S. C., January, 1815. After being educated at the university of South Carolina he removed to Mississippi, and studied law at Vicksburg, under the celebrated statesman and orator, Sergeant S. Prentiss. Well equipped for the battle of life, he began practice in 1835. His success in his profession was rapid and he became a judge of the circuit court in Mississippi. He moved to Texas, and was soon in the front rank of his profession in the new State. The questions that had long divided the North and South,
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...