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John W. Whitfield (search for this): chapter 19
eral Baylor at Houston, Tex. Brigadier-General John W. Whitfield began his military career as co into confusion. At the time of this battle Whitfield was major of a battalion designated in the reports as Whitfield's battalion, under the command of Brig.-Gen. Albert Pike. Col. Henry Little, whMissouri volunteers, in his report thanks Major Whitfield, with several others, for the manner in w about to cross the Mississippi in 1862, Colonel Whitfield was ordered to proceed to Memphis with huka, Miss., fought September 19th, said that Whitfield's legion won, under its gallant leader, a reand the best, and noted with regret that Colonel Whitfield was painfully wounded. At the close of the year Colonel Whitfield, having recovered, was at Yazoo City with his cavalry command. He partiin the action. On the 9th of May, 1863, Colonel Whitfield received the commission of brigadier-genthe very day that Vicksburg surrendered, General Whitfield encountered a party of 500 Federals. He
Louis Trezevant Wigfall (search for this): chapter 19
ked and defeated them at Messinger's ferry. Through the whole of 1864 he commanded a brigade under Forrest, and was in Mississippi when the war closed in 1865. He then returned to Texas, where he subsequently made his home. Brigadier-General Louis Trezevant Wigfall Brigadier-General Louis Trezevant Wigfall was born on the plantation of his father, in Edgefield district, Harrison county, S. C., April 21, 1816. He attended the Columbian college in South Carolina, taking the regular coursBrigadier-General Louis Trezevant Wigfall was born on the plantation of his father, in Edgefield district, Harrison county, S. C., April 21, 1816. He attended the Columbian college in South Carolina, taking the regular course, until the outbreak of the Seminole war, when he enlisted, and received a commission as lieutenant of volunteers. After the close of the war, he began the study of law at the university of Virginia, and upon his admission to the bar, in 1846, he moved to Texas and settled at Marshall, where he began the practice. He was elected to the State legislature of 1856-57, and was re-elected to that body for 1859-60. While serving in the State senate, in the winter of 1860, he was elected to the S
Jones M. Withers (search for this): chapter 19
852 and 1853; at Fort Union, in the same territory, from 1853 to 1854, and then at Baton Rouge, La. After a year's leave of absence, he resigned and settled down in his native State as a schoolteacher. A short time before the beginning of the war he moved to Texas. He went into the Confederate army from that State, and was commissioned colonel of the Second Texas infantry, September 2, 1861. At the head of this regiment he participated in the battle of Shiloh, April 6 and 7, 1862. Gen. Jones M. Withers, in his report of the battle, speaking of the time when the enemy was driven from his first position, alluded to the great gallantry of Colonel Moore. His regiment formed part of the force that enveloped and captured the splendid division of Prentiss. During the operations around Corinth, Colonel Moore was promoted to brigadier-general, being commissioned on the 26th of May, 1862. In the assault on Corinth his brigade went further than any other, according to General Maury, and at
Hugh F. Young (search for this): chapter 19
born in Booneville, Mo., January 1, 1838. His father, Hugh F. Young, who was a native of Augusta county, Va., removed firstfor a while in Red River and then in Grayson counties. General Young had a liberal education, obtained at Washington collegeccasion by Col. A. J. Vaughn, Jr., and the gallantry of Colonel Young and his men won the especial commendation of General Cheatham. At this battle Colonel Young was wounded in the right shoulder and had two horses killed under him. Afterward, in tisabled so that he could no longer command his brigade, Colonel Young took his place, and was appointed brigadier-general, Aunt to capture Allatoona. In the battle which resulted, General Young's horse was shot under him and the bones of his left annson's island, where he was imprisoned until July 25th. General Young was one of the youngest brigadiers of the Confederacy. xas cavalry, Colonel Locke; the Eleventh Texas cavalry, Colonel Young; Lieutenant-Colonel Crump's battalion of Texas cavalry
William Hugh Young (search for this): chapter 19
after the cause was lost, sailed from Galveston to England, where he resided for three years. On his return to America he settled at Baltimore. While on a visit to his old home in Texas, he died at Galveston, February 18, 1873. Brigadier-General William Hugh Young Brigadier-General William Hugh Young was born in Booneville, Mo., January 1, 1838. His father, Hugh F. Young, who was a native of Augusta county, Va., removed first to Missouri, and when his son, William Hugh, was three years oBrigadier-General William Hugh Young was born in Booneville, Mo., January 1, 1838. His father, Hugh F. Young, who was a native of Augusta county, Va., removed first to Missouri, and when his son, William Hugh, was three years old, moved to Texas and lived for a while in Red River and then in Grayson counties. General Young had a liberal education, obtained at Washington college, Tennessee, McKenzie college, Texas, and the university of Virginia, and was graduated just after the beginning of the civil war. The university at this time having had a military school attached, he remained there and studied military tactics. In September he returned to Texas and raised a company for the Confederate army. He was commission
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