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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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State to the United States military academy, entering that institution July 1, 1845, and four years later graduating, with promotion to brevet second lieutenant of the Fourth artillery. He served in Florida against the Seminole Indians, 1849 and 1850; on frontier duty at Sante Fe, N. M., 1852 and 1853; at Fort Union, in the same territory, from 1853 to 1854, and then at Baton Rouge, La. After a year's leave of absence, he resigned and settled down in his native State as a schoolteacher. A shoing the savages to terms. He was an active participant in all the stirring events that occurred from the independence of Texas until the annexation to the United States. In 1848 he was elected to the lower house of the State legislature, and in 1850 to the State senate. He was a member of the State convention that passed the ordinance of secession, and was one of the first to raise a company for the war, entering the Confederate service, as a captain, in the Fifth Texas infantry, Hood's brig
rn at Albany, N. Y., in 189; was educated at the United States military academy, and graduated in 1840. He was first assigned to the Second dragoons, stationed in Florida. He served in the military occupation of Texas, and with gallantry in the Mexican war, and on May 9, 1846, was promoted first lieuenant. In the desperate battles of Contreras and Churubusco he won great distinction by his quick and decisive action and dashing bravery, and earned the brevet of captain. While in Texas, in 1851, he was commissioned captain. He was then sent to New Mexico, where he rendered valuable service until 1854, when he was detailed to Kansas, Dakota and Nebraska, where he was engaged in various expeditions against the Indians. He resigned his commission in the United States army in May, 1861, to join the Confederate army, and was appointed colonel of the Seventh Texas cavalry. During the expedition to New Mexico, early in 1862, under Gen. H. H. Sibley, he was in command in the Mesilla regi
pointed from that State to the United States military academy at West Point. He was graduated in 1852, and promoted in the army to brevet second lieutenant of infantry, after which he served in garrison at Fort Columbus, New York, 1852-53, and on frontier duty at Fort Chadbourne, Texas, 1853. He resigned in September of that year, and began the study of law. Being admitted to the bar, he practicriff of San Francisco county, offices in which the two won great renown. He returned to Texas in 1852, and was appointed United States marshal of the eastern district of that State, and was reappointal James P. Major was born in Missouri in 1833. He entered the United States military academy in 1852, and was graduated in 1856 as brevet second lieutenant of cavalry. He served at the cavalry schorved in Florida against the Seminole Indians, 1849 and 1850; on frontier duty at Sante Fe, N. M., 1852 and 1853; at Fort Union, in the same territory, from 1853 to 1854, and then at Baton Rouge, La. A
t of infantry, after which he served in garrison at Fort Columbus, New York, 1852-53, and on frontier duty at Fort Chadbourne, Texas, 1853. He resigned in September 1853. He resigned in September of that year, and began the study of law. Being admitted to the bar, he practiced at Mobile, Ala., from 1854 to 1858; then moved to Gonzales, Tex., and was living the captures of noted criminals. He was elected member of the State legislature in 1853, and, two years later, was chosen to the State senate. During 1846 and 1848 he ny, Clinton county, Ky., where he achieved distinction. He married Miss Dent in 1853, and returned to Paris, where he continued the practice of law until 1861. Thoue Seminole Indians, 1849 and 1850; on frontier duty at Sante Fe, N. M., 1852 and 1853; at Fort Union, in the same territory, from 1853 to 1854, and then at Baton Roug1853 to 1854, and then at Baton Rouge, La. After a year's leave of absence, he resigned and settled down in his native State as a schoolteacher. A short time before the beginning of the war he moved to
t year, and began the study of law. Being admitted to the bar, he practiced at Mobile, Ala., from 1854 to 1858; then moved to Gonzales, Tex., and was living there in 1861, when the war between the Stan McCulloch's company of cavalry. Later he served at Laredo in the rank of first lieutenant. In 1854 he was married to Mildred Tarver, of Alabama. In addition to his public service in the ante-Confontier duty at Sante Fe, N. M., 1852 and 1853; at Fort Union, in the same territory, from 1853 to 1854, and then at Baton Rouge, La. After a year's leave of absence, he resigned and settled down in hiorn in Tennessee in 183. He entered the United States military academy in 1849, was graduated in 1854 as brevet second lieutenant of infantry, and in the following year was promoted to second lieutens commissioned captain. He was then sent to New Mexico, where he rendered valuable service until 1854, when he was detailed to Kansas, Dakota and Nebraska, where he was engaged in various expeditions
is an irreparable loss to me. Brigadier-General Horace Randal Brigadier-General Horace Randal was born in Tennessee in 183. He entered the United States military academy in 1849, was graduated in 1854 as brevet second lieutenant of infantry, and in the following year was promoted to second lieutenant, First dragoons. His service in the United States army was mainly on frontier duty, in the course of which he engaged in combats with the Indians; against the Apaches, near Fort Bliss, in 1855, and near the Almagre mountains, New Mexico, in April, 1856, and again near the Gila river, November 30th of the same year. He resigned February 27, 1861, and in the war between the North and South bore a conspicuous part as leader of Texas troops. In 1862 he had command of a brigade of Texas cavalry, McCulloch's division, and was on duty in the district of Arkansas. He proved himself a very efficient officer and, like many others, was in command of a brigade long before he received a comm
se who knew him. He died in Guadalupe county, Texas, March 12, 1895. Brigadier-General James P. Major Brigadier-General James P. Major was born in Missouri in 1833. He entered the United States military academy in 1852, and was graduated in 1856 as brevet second lieutenant of cavalry. He served at the cavalry school for practice, Carlisle, Pa., and in December, 1856, was made full second lieutenant. He was on frontier duty next year, scouting and fighting, being engaged in a skirmish wi After the close of the war, he began the study of law at the university of Virginia, and upon his admission to the bar, in 1846, he moved to Texas and settled at Marshall, where he began the practice. He was elected to the State legislature of 1856-57, and was re-elected to that body for 1859-60. While serving in the State senate, in the winter of 1860, he was elected to the Senate of the United States, where he took his seat January 4, 1861. He soon made himself felt as a power on the sid
April, 1856 AD (search for this): chapter 19
ce Randal Brigadier-General Horace Randal was born in Tennessee in 183. He entered the United States military academy in 1849, was graduated in 1854 as brevet second lieutenant of infantry, and in the following year was promoted to second lieutenant, First dragoons. His service in the United States army was mainly on frontier duty, in the course of which he engaged in combats with the Indians; against the Apaches, near Fort Bliss, in 1855, and near the Almagre mountains, New Mexico, in April, 1856, and again near the Gila river, November 30th of the same year. He resigned February 27, 1861, and in the war between the North and South bore a conspicuous part as leader of Texas troops. In 1862 he had command of a brigade of Texas cavalry, McCulloch's division, and was on duty in the district of Arkansas. He proved himself a very efficient officer and, like many others, was in command of a brigade long before he received a commission as brigadier-general. At the battle of Milliken'
December, 1856 AD (search for this): chapter 19
, his gentle manliness and adhesion to right and justice won for him success in his undertakings and the love and admiration of those who knew him. He died in Guadalupe county, Texas, March 12, 1895. Brigadier-General James P. Major Brigadier-General James P. Major was born in Missouri in 1833. He entered the United States military academy in 1852, and was graduated in 1856 as brevet second lieutenant of cavalry. He served at the cavalry school for practice, Carlisle, Pa., and in December, 1856, was made full second lieutenant. He was on frontier duty next year, scouting and fighting, being engaged in a skirmish with the Comanche Indians near Fort Clarke, Tex., also in a combat with the Kiowas and Comanches near Grand Saline. On October 1, 1858, he was engaged in a skirmish against the Comanches near Wichita village, Tex., where he killed three Indians with his own hand. In 1859-61 he was at Indianola, Tex., a commissary depot. When the secession movement began, he resigne
ld district, Harrison county, S. C., April 21, 1816. He attended the Columbian college in South Carolina, taking the regular course, until the outbreak of the Seminole war, when he enlisted, and received a commission as lieutenant of volunteers. After the close of the war, he began the study of law at the university of Virginia, and upon his admission to the bar, in 1846, he moved to Texas and settled at Marshall, where he began the practice. He was elected to the State legislature of 1856-57, and was re-elected to that body for 1859-60. While serving in the State senate, in the winter of 1860, he was elected to the Senate of the United States, where he took his seat January 4, 1861. He soon made himself felt as a power on the side of his colleagues from the South. When hostilities began, Texas had not seceded, and he remained at his post, where his brilliant and defiant rejoinders to the charges against his people, and his eloquent advocacy of the justice and right of the South
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