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h 33,000 men, began his movement upon Vicksburg in December, the brigades of Barton, Gregg and Vaughn were promptly transferred from Grenada to Vicksburg. In the battle which occurred at Chickasaw bayou, December 27, 1862, resulting in the repulse of Sherman with a loss of 1,776 in killed, wounded and missing, only a small part of the Confederates near Vicksburg were engaged, and Gregg's brigade had but a slight part in the battle. In January, 1863, he was transferred to Port Hudson, and in May ordered to Jackson. During the advance of Grant upon Vicksburg from the rear, in May, 1863, the Confederate forces in Mississippi were so managed that they were put into battle in detachments and beaten in detail. General Gregg, alone at Raymond, on May 12th, was allowed to be overwhelmed by a greatly superior force, but the fight he made was a memorable one. He retreated from that field in the direction of Jackson, where he was reinforced by other commands, forming the force that was bein
n with a loss of 1,776 in killed, wounded and missing, only a small part of the Confederates near Vicksburg were engaged, and Gregg's brigade had but a slight part in the battle. In January, 1863, he was transferred to Port Hudson, and in May ordered to Jackson. During the advance of Grant upon Vicksburg from the rear, in May, 1863, the Confederate forces in Mississippi were so managed that they were put into battle in detachments and beaten in detail. General Gregg, alone at Raymond, on May 12th, was allowed to be overwhelmed by a greatly superior force, but the fight he made was a memorable one. He retreated from that field in the direction of Jackson, where he was reinforced by other commands, forming the force that was being assembled under Gen. J. E. Johnston, with the design of raising the siege of Vicksburg. After the fall of Vicksburg and the evacuation of Jackson, when forces were being concentrated in Georgia to enable Bragg to defeat Rosecrans, Gregg's brigade was one o
ch he was leading had never before been in action, but, under his guidance, behaved with such coolness and bravery as to win the approval of General Taylor in his reports. In the reports of this campaign, including the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, his name frequently appears, always in connection with honorable service. In the pursuit of Banks, Debray commanded a cavalry brigade under General Bee, and kept up the good work he had begun on his first encounter with the enemy. On May 18th the Federals ambuscaded him; but, said General Taylor, Debray opened, enfilading their line. Many were killed and wounded, and Wharton's charge captured a good many prisoners. After the termination of the Red river campaign, Colonel Debray was appointed a brigadier-general by Gen. Kirby Smith; he had worthily won this rank. After the peace he returned to Texas and made his home in Austin, where he died on January 9, 1895. Brigadier-General Matthew Duncan Ector Brigadier-General Mat
onfederate Congress. He served in that capacity until the organization of the permanent Confederate government in February, 1862. Resigning his seat in Congress, he raised a fine body of troops, known in the Confederate army of the West as Waul's Texas legion. Of this he was commissioned colonel, May 17, 1862, and assigned to the department under Van Dorn, and afterward under Pemberton. Waul's Texans especially distinguished themselves during the siege of Vicksburg, in the recapture, on May 22d, of one of Gen. Stephen D. Lee's redoubts, where the enemy had planted two of their colors. After other commands had hesitated, 40 men of Waul's legion recovered the redoubt, capturing 100 men and the flags. Immediately 30 guns of the enemy were trained upon them; they were almost buried in the debris thrown up around them, but, though some were wounded, none were killed. The captured colors were presented to Colonel Waul as due to the valor of the Texans. During this assault General Le
ne of the finest bodies of troops that ever left the Lone Star State for the scene of conflict. General Hindman, at that time commanding the army in Arkansas, spoke of this regiment as a well-armed and finely-equipped command. Colonel Nelson, in June, took position at Devall's Bluff, where intrenchments were thrown up and three heavy guns placed in position. General Hindman reinforced him with a regiment and a battalion of Arkansas infantry, just organized, and armed partly with shotguns and ly with pikes and lances, together with three batteries of artillery, and placed Colonel Nelson over the brigade thus formed. A Federal force of infantry and artillery, on transports, and several gunboats, approached this point toward the last of June, but the enemy was repulsed with a loss of 55 killed, wounded and prisoners, by Morgan's squadron of Texans and four unattached companies of Arkansas troops, under P. H. Wheat, assisted by several independent companies of non-conscripts. The Fede
Richmond, and, though wounded at Second Manassas, was at Boonsboro gap, after which his physical exhaustion was so great that he had to be carried from the field, and was unable to take part in the battle of Sharpsburg. But he had so well proved his ability to command troops in action that, on November 1, 1862, he was commissioned brigadier-general and placed in command of Hood's famous Texas brigade. At Gettysburg the heaviest fighting done by Robertson's command was on the afternoon of July 2d, on the line of battle running along the lower slope of Devil's Den to the Confederate left on Round Top, separated from the latter by Plum run valley. Notwithstanding the heavy fire the Confederates, though thinned at every step, pressed on and forced back the Union lines. In this desperate battle General Robertson was again wounded. He was, however, ready for the fray when General Longstreet went to Georgia, in September, and took part in the battle of Chickamauga. Later in the month
e serving in the State senate, in the winter of 1860, he was elected to the Senate of the United States, where he took his seat January 4, 1861. He soon made himself felt as a power on the side of his colleagues from the South. When hostilities began, Texas had not seceded, and he remained at his post, where his brilliant and defiant rejoinders to the charges against his people, and his eloquent advocacy of the justice and right of the Southern cause, won for him immortal distinction. On July 4th, when the extra session of the Thirty-seventh Congress was called, he was not in his seat, and was expelled from that body July 11th. After Texas seceded he went at once to Montgomery, Ala., was there at the formation of the Confederacy, and was one of the signers of the Constitution. He was in Charleston, at the bombardment of Fort Sumter, and served as aide-de-camp on the staff of General Beauregard. He was stationed on Morris island, under Gen. James Simons, and on seeing the second b
ry 4, 1861. He soon made himself felt as a power on the side of his colleagues from the South. When hostilities began, Texas had not seceded, and he remained at his post, where his brilliant and defiant rejoinders to the charges against his people, and his eloquent advocacy of the justice and right of the Southern cause, won for him immortal distinction. On July 4th, when the extra session of the Thirty-seventh Congress was called, he was not in his seat, and was expelled from that body July 11th. After Texas seceded he went at once to Montgomery, Ala., was there at the formation of the Confederacy, and was one of the signers of the Constitution. He was in Charleston, at the bombardment of Fort Sumter, and served as aide-de-camp on the staff of General Beauregard. He was stationed on Morris island, under Gen. James Simons, and on seeing the second barracks in flames and the flagstaff shot away, he determined to make his way to the fort, in the face of almost certain death, and p
f the army to the brave, skillful and gallant conduct of Lieutenant-Colonel Lane, of the Third regiment Texas dismounted cavalry, who, with 246 men, on the 29th ultimo, charged a largely superior force of enemy; drove him from his position, and forced him to leave a large number of his dead and wounded upon the field. The conduct of this brave regiment is worthy of all honor and imitation. In the reports of operations in Louisiana in 1863, Colonel Lane's name appears frequently. On the 13th of July the Confederates, under Gen. Thomas Green, gained a brilliant victory on the Bayou Lafourche. Colonel Lane commanded a brigade in this affair, and General Green spoke in very complimentary terms of Lane's part in it. He was equally distinguished in the Red river campaign, in the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, and subsequent operations, until disabled by a wound. He was soon in the saddle again, and, in October, 1864, was recommended by Gen. E. Kirby Smith for promotion to the ra
engagements around Atlanta and during the evacuation of that city. During Hood's march into north Georgia, French's division was sent to capture Allatoona. In the battle which resulted, General Young's horse was shot under him and the bones of his left ankle were shot in twain. Being captured in this condition he lay for four months in Federal hospitals at Marietta, Atlanta, Chattanooga and Nashville. In February, 1865, he was carried to Johnson's island, where he was imprisoned until July 25th. General Young was one of the youngest brigadiers of the Confederacy. Since the war he has resided at San Antonio, Tex., devoting himself to the law and business in real estate. Brigadier-General Joseph Lewis Hogg Brigadier-General Joseph Lewis Hogg, of Texas, as soon as his State seceded from the Union, with that fidelity to the principle of State sovereignty which characterized so many thousands of the men of the South, threw his whole soul into the effort to make good the claim t
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