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January 14th, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 19
t Newnan; capturing about 1,000 and routing the balance, who were scattered in every direction. When, after the fall of Atlanta, Hood started into Tennessee, Harrison's brigade, with the rest of Wheeler's cavalry, accompanied him until Forrest with his fine command joined the army of Tennessee. Then Wheeler took the larger part of his command and moved back into Georgia, for the purpose of protecting the country, as far as possible, from the raids of Sherman's cavalry and bummers. On January 14, 1865, he was commissioned brigadier-general, an honor that he had long merited, having been in command of a brigade for more than a year. He was with Johnston at the surrender in North Carolina. After the war he made his home in Waco, Texas, where he died July 14, 1891. Brigadier-General Walter P. Lane Brigadier-General Walter P. Lane was early in the field in 1861 as lieutenant-colonel of the Third Texas cavalry, or the South Kansas-Texas cavalry, as it was first called. His regim
ted to colonel, and in a short time was commanding the brigade of General Green, who had command of division. The Texas cavalry commands did splendid service in the defense of their own State and of Louisiana. At the opening of the Red river campaign of 1864, Colonel Hardeman led his regiment in Bagby's brigade of the cavalry division of General Major, which reached Mansfield, April 6th, and in this capacity had a conspicuous part in the battle of April 8th, as well as at Pleasant Hill, April 9th. In the subsequent pursuit of Banks, the exploits of the cavalry were brilliant and successful. On October 28, 1864, Gen. Kirby Smith earnestly recommended Colonel Hardeman for promotion to the rank of brigadier-general, mentioning him, with Debray and Lane, as the best brigade commanders in the Trans-Mississippi department. In a letter written December 23d, Adjutant-General Cooper stated to General Smith that President Davis had nominated W. P. Hardeman, J. E. Harrison and W. P. Lane a
January 4th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 19
d, and received a commission as lieutenant of volunteers. After the close of the war, he began the study of law at the university of Virginia, and upon his admission to the bar, in 1846, he moved to Texas and settled at Marshall, where he began the practice. He was elected to the State legislature of 1856-57, and was re-elected to that body for 1859-60. While serving in the State senate, in the winter of 1860, he was elected to the Senate of the United States, where he took his seat January 4, 1861. He soon made himself felt as a power on the side of his colleagues from the South. When hostilities began, Texas had not seceded, and he remained at his post, where his brilliant and defiant rejoinders to the charges against his people, and his eloquent advocacy of the justice and right of the Southern cause, won for him immortal distinction. On July 4th, when the extra session of the Thirty-seventh Congress was called, he was not in his seat, and was expelled from that body July 11
March 25th, 1877 AD (search for this): chapter 19
uired. General Greer cooperated in every way with General Magruder, commanding the district of Texas, and assisted that general in reconciling differences that existed between the conscription laws of the Confederate States and the laws of the State of Texas. During operations in 1864, General Greer also commanded the reserve forces in the Trans-Mississippi department. After the return of peace he remained for a while in Texas, and then removed to Arkansas. He died at Devall's Bluff, March 25, 1877. Brigadier-General John Gregg Brigadier-General John Gregg fought in three of the principal armies of the Confederacy, and gained distinction in each. He entered the service in the Seventh Texas as colonel of the regiment; was captured at Fort Donelson, and, on being exchanged, he and his regiment were stationed for a time at Grenada, Miss. He was commissioned brigadier-general on August 29, 1862. His brigade embraced, during the campaign in north Mississippi and afterward in t
September 10th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 19
s brigade. When Hindman first took charge of operations in Arkansas there was great demoralization among troops and people in that State. His vigorous measures brought order out of chaos and restored confidence. In a report to the war department he referred to the prompt patriotism with which Brigadier-Generals Hebert, McCulloch and Nelson, and the officers and men of the various Texas regiments, came to my assistance. Colonel Nelson had been promoted to brigadier-general on the 10th of September, 1862. Not long after this the country was deprived of the services of this estimable gentleman and talented officer by death. General Holmes announced this event as follows: I have the painful duty to perform of reporting the death of Brigadier-General Nelson, who commanded a division. He is an irreparable loss to me. Brigadier-General Horace Randal Brigadier-General Horace Randal was born in Tennessee in 183. He entered the United States military academy in 1849, was graduate
e was, in the latter part of 1862, promoted to colonel, and in a short time was commanding the brigade of General Green, who had command of division. The Texas cavalry commands did splendid service in the defense of their own State and of Louisiana. At the opening of the Red river campaign of 1864, Colonel Hardeman led his regiment in Bagby's brigade of the cavalry division of General Major, which reached Mansfield, April 6th, and in this capacity had a conspicuous part in the battle of April 8th, as well as at Pleasant Hill, April 9th. In the subsequent pursuit of Banks, the exploits of the cavalry were brilliant and successful. On October 28, 1864, Gen. Kirby Smith earnestly recommended Colonel Hardeman for promotion to the rank of brigadier-general, mentioning him, with Debray and Lane, as the best brigade commanders in the Trans-Mississippi department. In a letter written December 23d, Adjutant-General Cooper stated to General Smith that President Davis had nominated W. P. H
January 25th, 1881 AD (search for this): chapter 19
uties of superintendent of Indian affairs. He directed many important military movements, and it was under his orders that Gen. Stand Watie (a Cherokee Indian) and General Gano made large and important captures. He was given command of a cavalry division in 1865. Returning to the practice of law, after the close of the war, he was elected Supreme court judge, which office he declined. In 1874 he was elected to the United States Senate, took his seat March 5, 1875, and was re-elected January 25, 1881. While in the Senate, he efficiently served on the committees on Territories, on military operations, on education and labor, and was chairman of the committee on postoffices. His labors to secure frontier protection were of great value. He advocated liberal appropriations for the improvement of rivers and harbors, the enlargement of postal facilities, and was the author of a bill which was the first to assert the right of way to railroads through Indian Territory, to facilitate immi
July 1st, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 19
ld and Pleasant Hill with great distinction, and, pursuing the enemy, lost his life at Blair's landing, April 12, 1863. Major-General Banks, commanding the Federal army, in his report to General Sherman, said: General Green was killed by the fire of the gunboats on the 12th; he was the ablest officer in their service. Brigadier-General Elkanah Greer Brigadier-General Elkanah Greer entered the Confederate army in the Third Texas cavalry, of which he was commissioned colonel on the 1st of July, 1861. His first battle was that of Wilson's Creek, Missouri, August 10, 1861. Here Colonel Greer proved well his fitness for command. In October, Governor Jackson sent him as the bearer of a note to President Davis at Richmond, writing in the way of introduction, The bearer of this note, Colonel Greer, of Texas, is probably better known to you than myself, but I know him well and can say of him, that he is a gentleman worthy of the highest confidence. At the battle of Pea Ridge, or Elk
September 12th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 19
s fought, in which both sides claimed the victory. Two days later, at Glorieta, the Confederates under Scurry gained another success. The utter impossibility of subsisting his army, however, soon compelled Sibley's retreat. With great difficulty he extricated his army from that desolate region and from the thronging foes that pressed upon him. Colonel Scurry had exhibited such capacity for command, and so well conducted himself in subsequent movements in Texas and Arkansas, that, on September 12, 1862, he was commissioned brigadier-general. On the 1st of January, 1863, when General Magruder attacked the Union fleet and land forces at Galveston, Tex., General Scurry was in immediate command of the Confederate land forces. The result was a splendid victory. In the Red river campaign of 1864, Scurry's brigade participated in the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill. As soon as it was known that Banks was in full retreat for Alexandria, Scurry was taken by Kirby Smith, with others
November 11th, 1811 AD (search for this): chapter 19
was sent in by President Davis in December, and his commission was dated March 17, 1865. The war soon after came to an end, and the gallant men who had so bravely upheld the cause of the South returned to their homes, to help rebuild the shattered fortunes of their beloved States. General Lane still lives (1898) in Texas, where he enjoys the esteem of his neighbors and friends. Brigadier-General Ben McCulloch Brigadier-General Ben McCulloch was born in Rutherford county, Tenn., November 11, 1811, of a well-known family in Tennessee, with whom were connected the Fosters, Lytles and Nicholses, descendants of the Scotch-Irish borderers, who wrested Tennessee and Kentucky from the red men. His father was Alexander McCulloch, who won distinction as an aide-de-camp of Gen. James Coffee, under General Jackson, in the Creek and British wars of 1812 and 1815. Ben McCulloch spent his early life in Dyer county, Tenn. He seemed to have a natural love and talent for woodcraft, and became
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